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The University Library 
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The Blanche Leigh Collection 
of Cookery Books 
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JPutUrhaJ tyJiatkavj- & Xeiph , Jtmtol 



THE 



IMPERIAL 

AND 

ROYAL COOK: 

CONSISTING OF 

THE MOST SUMPTUOUS MADE DISHES, 

RAGOUTS, FRICASSEES, SOUPS, 

GRAVIES, &C. 

Foreign and English : 

INCLUDING THE LATEST IMPROVEMENTS 

IN 

FASHIONABLE LIFE. 

SECOND EDITION. 

BY 

FREDERIC NUTT, 

t* 

AUTHOR OF THE COMPLETE CONFECTIONER. 



LONDON: 



PRINTED FOR SAMUEL LEIGH, STRAND; AND BALDWIN, 
CRADOCK, AND JOY, PATERNOSTER ROW. 



1819 . 







S.1V101 



A D VE R 'RISE MEN T. 



f J.^HE reader may probably ask, What necessity 
is there for another Cookery Book, after the 
immense number which have already appeared, 
many of them with the names of those who are 
considered as proficients in the art? 

My answer is, that notwithstanding the num- 
ber of publications on this subject, there is still 
room for another ; because most of those alluded 
to so much resemble each other, that no ma- 
terial difference can be discovered in their 
general plan or execution. 

The general fault of cookery books is, that 
they are loaded with unnecessary, and indeed 
trifling, receipts, which every one, who has 
the slightest knowledge of cookery, must be 
thoroughly acquainted with. 



VI 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



In the work now presented to public inspec- 
tion, I do not profess to give any hackneyed re- 
ceipts for boiling or roasting, broiling or baking, 
but have confined my selection chiefly to the 
'higher departments of the art, such as made 
dishes, ragouts, fricassees, soups, gravies, &c. 
I have aimed, in general, to give the most es- 
teemed Foreign and English dishes that are now 
in use. 

An idea generally prevails, that those who 
have lived at an hotel, tavern, or coffee-house, 
must of course be thoroughly perfected in the 
art of cookery. 1 his is by no means the case: 
there are dishes made in noblemen’s houses, 
both in town and country, which a cook of the 
description I have mentioned knows very little 
about; it is only in the first families of rank 
and fashion that these things are to be found. 
The time which is allotted to a tavern cook in 
the ordinary course of his business, will not be 
sufficient to enable him to accomplish such de- 
signs, even if he were capable of it. Another 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



Vll 



reason, is the enormous expense which must at- 
tend the system of cookery of which I now speak. 

It will be perfectly understood, that I do not 
consider this as an introductory work: such 
publications are already so numerous, that there 
is no necessity to enlarge the number. 

It will be said, this book is not adapted for 
families in general ; the receipts arc too expen- 
sive. This is admitted : but are there not thou- 
sands of Opulent Families both in town and 
country, who wish to give handsome occasional 
entertainments to their select friends ; and who , 
on such occasions, are not so scrupulous of the 
expense f To such, I flatter myself, the present 
undertaking will be of great service. As to the 
common hints for marketing, carving, bills of 
fare, &c. what I have already said will suffi- 
ciently account for the omission. As to con- 
fectionary in general, I refer the reader to the 
last edition of my “ Complete Confectioner,” 
the rapid sale of which has exccded my most 
sanguine expectations. 



Vlll ADVERTISEMENT. 



To that indulgent public which has so fa- 
vourably encouraged “ The Complete Confec- 
tioner,” I now submit an improved edition of 
“ The Royal and Imperial Cook.” 



F. N. 



CONTENTS. 



SOUPS. 



General Remarks on Soups . . . . 

Soup a la Reine 

Vermicelli Soup, white or brown 
Sauce for Bouilli 



Giblet Soup a la Tortue 

Mock Turtle 

Soup a la Flamond 

To dress a Turtle the West India way . . . . 

Rice Soup with a Chicken 

Hare Soup '. 

Soup a l’Ecrevisse 

Asparagus Soup, clear 

Soup and Bouilli 

Ox Cheek Soup e 

Soup Loraine 

Soup Maigre 

General Stock for all kinds of Soups ... . . 

Coulis 

Sauce Tourney and Beshemell 

a 5 





Page 

1 

2 

4 

4 

5 

5 

6 
8 
8 

12 

12 

13 

14 

14 

15 
17 

17 

18 
20 
21 






X 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

White Braise 23 

Brown Braise 23 

Dry Braise 24- 

Soup Sante 25 

Jelly Stock 25 

General Meagre Stock for Soups, Sauce, &c. 26 

Hot Force-meat, commonly called Farce . . 26 

Cokl Force-meat for Balls, &c 27 

Egg Balls for Turtle, Mock Turtle, &c. . . 28 

Piquant Sauce 29 

Pouverade Sauce 29 

Carrot Sauce 30 

Sauce Hashis 30 

Alemand Sauce 30 

Italian Sauce brown 31 

Sorrel Sauce 31 

Chervil Sauce 32 

Shalot Sauce 32 

Royal Sauce, white or brown 33 

Flemish Sauce 33 

Ravigot Sauce 33 

Spanish Sauce 34. 

Sauce a la Reine 35 

Cucumber Sauce 35 

Dutch Sauce 36 

Mushrooms for first or second Course .... 36 

Truffles to keep a Year or more , 37 



CONTENTS.. 



XI 



BEEF MADE DISHES. 

Page 

Ox Rumps 39 

Beef Palates rolled 39 

Brisket of Beef stewed 40 

Fillet of Beef larded 41 

Peths au Gratin 42 

Rump of Beef a la Mantua 42 

Collard Beef 43 

Boeuf de Chasse 44 

Hodge Podge 45 

Beef Olives with Sauce Restauret 46 

Beef Palates . . 47 

Tripe. 48 

Stewed Beef 48 

Round of Beef forced 49 

Beef a la Mode 50 

Tongue and Udder forced 51 

A Fricandeau of Beef 52 

Portugal Beef 52 

Beef a la Vingrette 53 

Beef Steaks rolled 53 

Rump of Beef a la Daube and Cabbage . . 54 



Xll 



CONTENTS. 



MUTTON MADE DISHES. 



Souties of Mutton and Cucumber 

Sheep’s Rumps with Kidneys 

Sheep’s Trotters in Gratin 

Leg of Mutton roasted with Oysters 

Shoulder of Mutton, called Hen and Chick- 
ens 

Oxford John 

Mutton Rumps braised 

Haricot of Mutton 

China Chilo 



Page 

55 

55 

56 
56 



57 

57 

58 

59 

60 



LAMB MADE DISHES. 

Loin of Lamb braised, and Celery Sauce . . 60 

Shoulder of Lamb larded 61 

Two Necks of Lamb, Chevaux de Frise . . 61 

Lambs’ Feet with Asparagus Peas 62 

Lamb Cutlets larded, Breast rolled, and 

French Beans 63 

Tureen of Lambs’ Tails 64* 

Quarter of Lamb forced 65 

Leg of Lamb and Haricot Beans 66 

Chine of Lamb and Cucumber Sauce .... 67 



CONTENTS 



xm 



VEAL MADE DISHES. 

Page 

Veal Olives 67 

Breast of Veal ragouted whole 68 

Tenderones of Veal 69 

A Loin of Veal a la Beshemell 70 

A Roulard of Veal and Mushrooms 71 

White Collops and Cucumbers 72 

A Fillet of Veal a la Flamond 73 

Breast of Veal a la Flamond 73 

A Neck of Veal braised, and Sauce a la 

Reine 74 

A Souties of Sweetbreads and Piquant Sauce 74- 

Calves’ Ears forced 75 

Breast of Veal with Truffles a ITtalienne . . 76 

Three Sweetbreads and an Emince 76 

and Asparagus Peas . . 77 

Breast of Veal a ITtalienne 78 

Shoulder of Veal a la Piedmontaise 78 

Sweetbreads of Veal a la Dauphine 79 

German way of dressing a Calf’s Head . . 80 

Calf’s Pluck 81 

Pillow of Veal 82 

Scotch or scorched Collops 83 

Tureen of Calves’ Feet and Asparagus Peas 84- 



XIV 



CONTENTS. 



PORK MADE DISHES. 

Page 

A Fillet of Pork 85 

A Ham braised 85 

A Leg of Pork a la Boisseau 86 

A Pig au Pere Duillet 87 

Sicilian manner of dressing Loin of Pork 

to eat like wild Boar 88 

Barbecued Pig 89 



MADE DISHES OF FOIVL. 

A Fowl a la Daube 90 

Ragout Melle 90 

Two Ducks a la Daube 91 

Boiled Chickens and Tarragon Sauce .... 92 

Chickens and Celery Sauce 92 

A Currie of Rabbits 93 

A Currie another way 93 

A Fricassee of Chickens 94 

Fat Livers in Cases 95 

A Civet of Hare 9g 

Two Ducks braised with Turnips 96 

A Fricandeau of Fowl and Endive 97 



CONTENTS. 



XV 



Page 

A Salmie of wild Ducks 98 

A Blanquct of Poularde with Mushrooms 99 

A Souties of Pheasants and Truffles 100 

Two Woodcocks a la Tartar 101 

Salmie of Woodcocks 102 

Pigeons a la Crapaudine and Piquant Sauce 103 

Compote of Pigeons with Truffles 101 

Fowl a la Daubc, ornamented and garnished 

with Aspic 105 

Capiloted Fowl 107 

Fillets of Hare larded, and a Puree of Plarc 

under them 108 

Pigeons braised and Asparagus Peas 108 

Quenels of Fowl 109 

Four Pigeons larded, and a Ragout of 

Cocks’ Combs 110 

Grouse braised, and Cabbage Ill 

Daubed Fowls 112 

A Jugged Hare 114 

Partridges and Pheasants preserved for En- 

tres, Pies, See 115 

Potted Flare . 118 

Chicken Panado 119 

Mutton Panado 120 

Snipes or Woodcocks in surtout 121 

Ducks a la Francoise 122 

Chickens in savory Jelly 122 



XVI 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Florendine Hare 123 

Chicken Chiringrate 125 

A Goose Marinade 126 

Marinaded Fowl 127 

Macedonian Ducks 127 

To dress a wild Duck 128 

To ragout a Goose 129 

To stew Giblets 130 

Pigeons in savoury Jelly 130 

Pigeons a la Daube 131 

Pigeons a la Royale 132 

Pigeons a la Plumpton 132 

Turkey a la Daube 133 

Larks a la Francoise 134 

Snipes with Purslain Leaves 134 

Rabbits surprised 135 

Rabbits en Gallentine 136 

Rabbits en Matelot 136 



FISH MADE DISHES. 

Saumon a la braze 137 

Salmon with sweet Herbs 138 

Soles a la Francoise 139 

Fillets of Salmon, with Capers 140 

6 



CONTENTS. 



XV 11 



Page 



Fillet of Sole a l’ltalienne 140 

Souties of Sole, with Sauce a la Heine .... 141 

Souties of Fish 142 

Semels of Turtle 142 

A Souties of Liver of Turtle 143 

Matelot of Tench 144 

Fillets of Whiting 144 

A dressed Crab, hot or cold 145 

Dressed Lobster, hot or cold 145 

A Volevent of Eels * . 146 

Fillet of Sturgeon, and Sauce Royal 147 

Morue a la Creme 148' 

Atlets of Oysters 149 

Fish Pie, with Tench and Eels, and hard 



Eggs 149 

Oysters fried in Batter 150 

Volevent of Oysters 151 

Rimaulade of Smelts 152 



Matelot of Carp 153 

Matelot of Carp and Eel 154 

A Pike or Jack baked 155 

A Souties of Salmon with Capers 156 

Pickled Salmon 157 

Crayfish in Aspic 1.57 

Souties of Carp 158 

Eels Spitch cock 159 

Carp baked 160 



XV111 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Salmon 161 

Turbot 162 

Haddock and Whitings 163 

Turtle 1 6i 



SWEETS. 

Chantilla Cake 170 

Spanish Fritters 170 

A Souffle of Ginger 171 

A Ratifie Pudding 173 

Rice Souffle 174 

Darioles X 75 

Clear Jelly, ornamented or plain 176 

Raspberry Cream 177 

Cederata Cream 17s 

Coffee Cream in Cups 178 

Tartlets 1^9 

Gateau Millefleur 179 

Rhenish Cream X8o 

Compote of Pears 180 

ATrifle 180 

Blanc Mange 182 

Apple and Barberry Tart 183 



CONTENTS. 



XIX 



Page 

Iceing for Rich Cakes , 183 

Sponge Biscuits for Cakes 181- 

Mushroom Fritters 185 

Pen d’ Amours 186 

Orange Cream 186 

China Orange Jelly 187 

Orange Soufllc 188 

Gum Paste for Ornaments 188 

A Tapioca Pudding 189 

Plum Pudding 189 

Meringues 190 

Small Curd and Almond Pudding baked . . 191 

Savoy Cake 192 

Custard Pudding 194* 

Chesnut Pudding 194- 

Citron Pudding 195 

A George Pudding 196 

Gooseberry Pudding 196 

A Grateful Pudding 197 

Lady Sunderland’s Pudding 197 

Italian Pudding 198 

Marrow Pudding 198 

Quince Pudding 199 

Sago Pudding 199 



XX 



CONTENTS. 



TARTS. 

Page 

Cherry 200 

Tart de Moi v . . . 201 

Angelica Tarts 201 

Chocolate Tart 202 

Orange Tart 202 

Raspberry Tarts and Cream 203 

Rhubarb Tart 203 

Sweet Pates 204- 

Pates like Mince Pies 204 

Veal Pates 204 



PUFFS. 

Almond 205 

Chocolate 205 

Curd 206 

Lemon 206 

Orange 207 

Sugar 207 



CONTENTS. 



XXI 



PANCAKES. 

Page 

Pancakes 208 

Cream Pancakes 208 

Rice Pancakes 209 

Pink Coloured Pancakes 209 



FRITTERS. 

Custard 210 

White Fritters 210 

Hasty 211 

Royal 211 



PIES AND PASTRY. 

Pigeon Pie in a Dish 212 

Pate a la Francoise 213 

Amiens Pie 213 

Goose and Turkey Pie 214 

Christmas Pie 220 



xxn 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Partridge Pie... 220 

Puff-Paste 222 

Ditto, another way 223 

Tart Paste 224- 

Paste, hot, for raised Pies 225 

Almond Paste 225 

Woodcock Pie, cold 226 

Mince Pies 227 

Small Mutton Pies 229 

W oodcock Pie 229 

Mutton and Potatoe Pie in a raised Crust 230 

Pate Goodeveau 231 

Risoles 232 

Timball of Maccaroni and Chicken 233 

Raised Pie, with a Neat’s Tongue 233 

Truffle Pie, hot 234 

Raised Pigeon Pie 235 

Lamb Pie, in a Dish 236 

Venison Pasty 236 

Potted 237 

Fine Pates 238 

Puffs, with Chicken 239 

Rich Veal Pie 240 

Veal or Lamb Pie a haut gout 240 

Calves’s Feet Pie 241 

Sweetbread Pie 242 



7 



CONTENTS. Xxiii 



VEGETABLES , %c. 

Page 

Stewecl Mushrooms 213 

Chartreuse 21-3 

Mushrooms either for first or second Course 241 

Turtle Herbs in Glaze 215 

Portable Sante Plevbs, to take to Sea or 

for Summer use 217 

French Beans preserved 219 



VENISON MADE DISHES. 

Haunch of Doe Venison 250 

Neck of Venison stewed 252 

Umbles of Deer 252 



EGG MADE DISHES. 

An Omelet 253 

— ; a la Bourgeoise 251 

Eggs fried in Paste 255 

with Onions and Mushrooms 255 



XXIV 



CONTENTS. 



MISCELLANOUS DISHES. ‘ 

Page 

Essence of Ham 256 

Portable Soup 257 

Glaze for Larding, &c 259 

Turtle Herbs, dried 259 

Browning for all Sauces and Gravies .... 260 

Fondues 261 

Sour Crout 262 

Sausages 263 

Sorrel for Winter use 264 

•> 

A Galentine 264 

Aspic of Brawn 265 

Crayfish Pudding 266 

A Grenade 267 



TIIE 



IMPERIAL 

AND 

ROYAL COOK, &c. 



SOUPS. 

IN making any kind of soups, particularly 
vermicelli, portable, brown gravy soup, or 
any other in which herbs are used, remem- 
ber to lay the meat in the bottom of your 
pan, with a large lump of butter. Having 
cut the roots and herbs small, stew them 
over the meat, and set the pan on a very 
slow fire. This will draw all the virtue 
out of the different ingredients, will pro- 
duce a good gravy, and a very different 
effect, in point of flavour, than if at first 
you had put in w ater. Fill your pan with 
w r ater as soon as the gravy is almost dried 
up. Take off the fat as soon as it begins 
to boil, and then follow the directions for 
making the sort of soup you wish to have. 

B 



2 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



Green peas, intended for soup, require 
hard water ; but soft water is preferable 
for old pea soup. In making white soup, 
let it be taken off the fire before you put 
in the cream.' As soups are soon cold, 
always dish them up the last thing. Take 
care all the greens and herbs you use in 
soups are well washed and clean picked, 
and that no one thing has a predominant 
taste over another, but that it has a fine 
agreeable relish, and that all the tastes be 
united. 



. ’ SOUP A LA REINE. 

Cut a few slices of lean ham, and cover 
the bottom of a Stew-pan, that will hold 
four quarts ; cut up two fowls, and put 
them in the stewpan, with a few slices of 
veal, some parsley, six onions, a few blades 
of mace, and about half a pint of water ; 
put it on a slow stove for an hour, to draw 
down ; (take care that it does not catch at 
the bottom :) when drawn down, fill up 
the stewpan with some of your best stock, 
and let it boil gently for one hour; take 



ROYAL COOK 



3 



out the fowls, and pull the meat from the 
bones ; put it into a mortar, with two 
ounces of sweet almonds ; let it be pounded 
very fine, so that it will go through a 
tammy : when beat enough, put it into a 
small soup-pot that will hold about three 
quarts ; put nearly two quarts of the stock 
which the fowls were boiled in, with the 
crumb of three French rolls ; let it boil for 
one hour, then rub it through a tammy, 
and add about a pint of good cream that 
has been boiled ; put it in the soup-pot, and 
put the pot into a stewpan of hot water, 
and set it by the side of a stove to boil. 
Before you put it into the tureen, taste it, 
as perhaps it may want a little salt, or a 
small bit of sugar : cut the crust of the 
rolls, which you took the crumb from, into 
round pieces, about the size of a shilling, 
and put them into the tureen before the 
soup is put in. 

N. B. All white soups should be wanned 
by putting the soup-pot into hot water. 



4 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



VERMICELLI SOUP, WHITE OR BROWN. 

Blanch as much vermicelli as is 
wanted, by putting it on the fire in cold 
water ; let it boil up, then strain it off, 
and put it into cold water ; let the vermi- 
celli stay in the water until it is cold, (if 
it is left on a sieve to drain while hot, 
it becomes lumpy, and will not dissolve 
again,) strain it quite dry from the cold 
water, put as much best stock as you want 
soup. If it is for white, make a liaison of 
six eggs. 



TO MAKE SAUCE FOR BOUILLI. 

Chop a boiled carrot, some parsley, two 
or three pickled cucumbers, and a few 
pickled mushrooms : put this into a sauce- 
pan, with a pint of good stock, aiid a spoon- 
ful of good mushroom catchup ; season it 
with pepper and salt, and a little Cayenne ; 
put the bouilli on a dish, pour sauce on it, 
and send it to table. 



IIOVAL COOK. 



5 



SOUP CRESSEY. 

% 

Grate four carrots, a few sliced onions, 
and cut lettuce ; put them all into a stew- 
pan, with a bit of butter ; put a pint of 
lentils on the top of the roots, and add a 
pint of good stock ; let it simmer for half 
an hour, then fill it up with the stock ; let 
it boil gently for an hour, then put in the 
crumb of two French rolls ; when well 
soaked, rub it all through a tammy ; have 
a little rice boiled in stock to put in the 
tureen. 



GIBLET SOUP A LA TORTUE. 

Scald four sets of giblets, bone the 
pinions, feet, and heads, cut the necks into 
pieces about one inch long, cut the giz- 
zard into about eight pieces, (the livers 
leave out, as they make a good dish for 
the second course ;) put them on to blanch, 
take them off when they have had one 
boil, throw them into cold water, and wash 
them as clean as possible ; put them into a 
small soup-pot, with about two quarts of 
best stock ; put them on a stove, let them 



0 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



boil gently till tender, put about a quarter 
of a pound of butter into a stewpan, with 
chopped shalots, knotted and sweet mar- 
joram, a little basil, about a quarter of a 
pound of lean ham, cut very fine, and tivo 
onions chopped, a handful of parsley chop- 
ped, and squeezed dry, and about half a 
pint of stock ; put it on a slow stove for 
an hour, then put as much flour as will dry 
up the butter, and add the stock which the 
giblets were boiled in, and a pint of Ma- 
deria; let it boil a few minutes, then rub 
it through a tammy, and put it to the 
giblets ; squeeze a Seville orange, and add 
a little sugar, and a small quantity of 
Cayenne pepper. 

\ 



MOCK TURTLE. 

Scald a calf’s head with the skin on, 
saw it in two, take out the brains, tie the 
head up in a cloth, and let it boil for one 
hour ; then take the meat from the bones, 
cut it into small square pieces, and throw 
them into cold water, to wash them 



ROYAL COOK. 



7 



clean ; then put the meat into a stewpan, 
with as much good stock as will cover 
the meat ; let it boil gently for an hour, 
or until quite tender; then take it oil’ the 
fire, put about half a pound of butter into 
a stewpan, and half a pound of lean ham, 
cut very fine, some chopped parsley, 
sweet marjoram, knotted ditto, basil, 
three onions, chopped mushrooms, and 
shalots ;* put a pint of stock to the herbs 
and butter, put them on a slow stove, and 
let them simmer for two hours ; put as 
much flour as will dry up the butter; add 
stock accordingly, so as to make two tu- 
reens ; also add a bottle of Madeira ; let 
it boil a few minutes, rub it through a 
tammy, and put it to the calf’s head ; put 
force-meat balls and egg balls ; season it 
with Cayenne pepper, and a little salt, if 
wanted ; squeeze two Seville oranges and 
one lemon, a little fine spice, and sugar 
to make it palatable. 

* Both shalots and thyme must be used with cau- 
tion ; a very small quantity of either is sufficient for 
any dish: indeed some Cooks leave them out entirely 



8 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



SOUP A LA FLAMOND. 

Shred turnips, carrots, celery, green 
onions or Spanish, very fine ; add lettuce, 
chervil, asparagus, and peas ; put them all 
into a stewpan, with about two ounces of 
butter, and a few spoonfuls of stock ; put 
them on a slow stove to sweat down for an 
hour ; make a liaison with the yolks of six 
eggs, (for two quarts of soup ;) beat the 
yolks very well in a bason, put a pint- of 
cream (that has boiled) by little at a time, 
strain it through a hair sieve, then add a 
large spoonful of beshemell ; take the soup 
off the fire, put the liaison to it, and keep 
stirring the soup ; then put it on a fire till 
it comes to a boil ; stir it all the time it is 
on the fire, otherwise the eggs will curdle ; 
season it with a little salt, if wanted, and 
put a small lump of sugar. 



TO DRESS A TURTLE THE WEST INDIA 

WAY. 

Hating taken the turtle out of the 

* 

water the night before you dress it, lay it 



ROYAL COOK 



9 



on its back : in the morning, cut its head 
off, and hang it up hy its hind fins to bleed 
till the blood is all out ; then cut the call a 
pee, which is the belly, round, and raise it 
up ; cut as much meat to it as you can ; 
throw it into spring water, with a little 
salt ; cut the fins off, and scald them with 
the head ; take off all the scales ; cut out 
all the white meat, and throw it into spring 
water and salt : the guts and lungs must 
be cut out : wash the lungs very clean 
from the blood ; then take the guts and 

O 

maw, and slit them open ; wash them very 
clean, and put them on to boil, in a large 
pot of water, till they become tender ; then 
take off the inside skin, and cut them in 
pieces of one inch long. In the meantime 
make some good veal broth: take one large 
or two small knuckles of veal, and put 
them on in three gallons of water ; let it 
boil, skim it well, season with turnips, 
carrots, and celery, a good large bundle of 
sweet herbs, onions chopped fine, half an 
ounce of cloves and mace, and half a nut- 
meg beat very fine : stew it very gently till 
tender, then take out the fins, put in a pint 

B 5 



10 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



of Madeira wine, and stew it a quarter of 
an hour : beat up the whites of six eggs 
with the juice of two lemons, put the liquor 
in, and boil it up ; run it through a flannel 
bag ; make it very hot ; wash the fins very 
clean, and put them in ; put a piece of 
butter at the bottom of a stewpan, put 
your white meat in, and sweat it gently 
till it is almost tender ; take out the lungs, 
strain off the liquor, thicken it, put in a 
bottle of Madeira wine, and season with 
Cayenne pepper and salt pretty high ; put 
in the lungs and white meat, and stew them 
up gently for fifteen minutes. Have some 

force-meat balls made out of the white 

* 

part, instead of veal, as for Scotch collops. 
If any eggs, scald them ; if not, take twelve 
hard yolks of eggs made into egg balls. 
Having your callapash, or deep shell, done 
round the edge with paste, season it in the 
inside with pepper and salt, and a little 
Madeira wine : bake it half an hour, then 
put in the lungs and white meat, force- 
meat, and eggs over, and bake it half an 
hour ; take the bones, and three quarts of 
veal broth, season it with an onion, a 



ROYAL COOK. 



11 



bundle of sweet herbs, and two blades of 
mace ; stew it an hour, strain it through 
a sieve, thicken it with butter and flour, 
put in half a pint of Madeira wine, stew it 
half an hour, and season with Cayenne 
and salt to your taste. This is the soup. 
— Take the callapee ; run your knife be- 
tween the meat and shell, and fill it with 
force-meat ; season it all over with sweet 
herbs chopped fine, a shalot chopped, Cay- 
enne pepper, salt, and a little Madeira 
wine ; put a paste round the edge, and 
bake it an hour and a half; take the guts 
and maw, put them into a stewpan, with a 
little broth, a bundle of sweet herbs, and 
two blades of mace finely beaten ; thicken 
with a little butter rolled in flour, stew 
them gently half an hour, and season with 
Cayenne pepper and salt : beat up the 
yolks of tw o eggs in half a pint of cream, 
put it in, and keep stirring one way till it 
boils up ; then dish them up, and put the 
callapee soup, and callapash, in the centre ; 
the fricasee on one side, and the fins on the 
other. The fins eat fine when cold, put by 
in liquor. 



12 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



RICE SOUP WITH A CHICKEN. 

Blanch about half a pound of rice, and 
put it into a stewpan, with one or two 
chickens, and a quart of stock ; set it on 
the stove to boil very slowly, until the 
chickens are very tender, and the rice the 
same ; then put as much stock as will fill 
the tureen ; skim the fat very clean from 
the soup. 



HARE SOUP. 

Cut a large hare into pieces, and put it 
into an earthen mug, with three blades of 
mace, two large onions, a little salt, half a 
dozen large morels, a pint of red wine, and 
three quarts of water ; bake it three hours 
in a quick oven, and then strain the liquor 
into a stewpan : have ready boiled, four 
ounces of fresh barley, and put it in ; just 
scald the liver, and rub it through a sieve 
with a wooden spoon ; put it into the soup, 
and set it over the fire, but do not let it 
boil ; keep stirring till it is on the brink of 
boiling, and then take it off; put some 



■ROYAL COOK 



13 



crisped bread into your tureen, and pour 
the soup into it. — This is a most delicious 
soup, and calculated for large entertain- 
ments. If any other kind of soup is pro- 
vided, this should be placed at the bottom 
of the table. 



SOUP A L’ECREVISSE. 

Boil an hundred fresh crayfish, also a 
fine lobster, and pick the meat clean out of 
each ; pound the shells of both in a mor- 
tar till they are very fine, and boil them in 
four quarts of stock, with four pounds of 
mutton, a pint of green split peas nicely 
picked and washed, a large turnip, a carrot, 
an onion, mace, cloves, and anchovy, a little 
pepper and salt ; stew them on a slow fire 
till all the goodness is out of the mutton 
and shells ; then strain it through a sieve, 
and put in the meat of your crayfish and 
lobster, but let them be cut into very 
small pieces, with the red coral of the 
lobster, if it has any : boil it half an hour ; 
and, just before you serve it up, add a little 
butter melted thick and smooth ; stir it 

G 



14 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



round when you put it in, and let it sim- 
mer very gently for about ten minutes : 
fry a French roll nice and brown, lay it in 
the middle of the dish, pour the soup on it, 
and serve it up hot. 



ASPARAGUS SOUP CLEAR. 

Boil a quart of asparagus peas till 
tender, then put three pints of good stock ; 
give it a boil, and put a small lump of su- 
gar in. 

N. B. If for white, make a liaison of 
four eggs and about a pint of beshemell. 



SOUP AND BOUILLI. 

Take about five pounds of briskets of 
beef, roll it up as tight as you can, and 
fasten it with a piece of tape ; put it into 
a stewpan, with four pounds of the leg-of- 
mutton-piece of beef, and about two gallons 
of water : when it boils, take off the scum 
quite clean, and put in it one large onion, 
two or three carrots, two turnips, a leek, 
two heads of celery, six or 'seven cloves, 



ROYAL COOK. 



15 



and some whole pepper ; stew the whole 
very gently, close covered, for six or seven 
hours : about an hour before dinner, strain 
the soup quite clean from the meat : have 
ready boiled carrots cut into small pieces 
with a carrot cutter, turnips cut into balls, 
spinage, a little chervil and sorrel, two 
heads of endive, and one or two of celery 
cut into pieces ; put them into a tureen 
with a French roll, dried, after the crumb 
is taken out ; pour the soup to these 
boiling hot, and add a little salt and Cay- 
enne pepper : take the tape from the beef, 
or bouilli, and place it into a dish by itself, 
with mashed turnips, and sliced carrots, 
each in a separate small dish ; and in this 
manner serve up the whole. 



OX CHEEK SOUP. 

Break the bones of the cheek, and, 
after having washed it thoroughly clean, 
put it into a large stewpan, with about 
two ounces of butter at the bottom, and 
lay the fleshy side downwards ; add to it 
about half a ound of clear ham, cut in 



16 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



slices ; put in four heads of celery cut 
small, three large onions, two carrots, one 
parsnip sliced, and three blades of mace : 
set it over a moderate fire for about a 
quarter of an hour, when the virtues of 
the roots will be extracted ; after which, 
put to it four quarts of water, and let it 
simmer gently till it is reduced to two. If 
you mean to use it as soup only, strain it 
clear off', and put in the white part of a head 
of celery cut into small pieces, with a little 
browning to make it a fine colour. Scald 
two ounces of vermicelli, and put into the 
soup ; then let it boil for about ten minutes, 
and pour it into your tureen with the crust 
of a French roll, and serve it up. If it is 
to be used as a stew, take up the cheek as 
whole as possible, and have ready a boiled 
turnip and carrot cut into square pieces, a 
slice of bread toasted, and cut in small 
slices ; put in a little Cayenne pepper, 
strain the soup through a hair sieve upon 
the whole, and carry it to table. 



t 



ROYAI, COOK, 



17 



SOUP LORAINE. 

Take a pound of almonds, blanch them, 
and beat them fine in a mortar, with a 
very little water, to keep them from oiling 1 ; 
then take all the white part of a large 
roasted fowl, with the yolks of four poached 
eggs, and pound all together as fine as 
possible : take three quarts of strong veal 
broth, let it be very white, and all the fat 
clean skimmed off. Pour it into a stewpan. 



SOUP MAIGRE. 

Put half a pound of butter into a deep 
stewpan, shake it about, and let it stand 
till it lias done making a noise ; then 
throw in six middle sized onions, peeled 
and cut small, and shake them about : 
take a bunch of celery, clean washed and 
picked, cut into pieces about half an inch 
in length ; a large handful of spinage, clean 
washed and picked ; a good lettuce (if it 
can be got), cut small, and a bundle of 
parsley, chopped fine : shake all these well 
in the pan for a quarter of an hour, and 



18 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



then strew in a little flour : stir all toge- 
ther in the stewpan, and put in two quarts 
of water: throw in a handful of nice dry 
crust, with about a quarter of an ounce of 
ground pepper, and three blades of mace 
beat fine : stir all together, and let it boil 
gently for about half an hour ; then take 
it off; beat up the yolks of two eggs, and 
stir them in with a spoonful of vinegar. 
Pour the whole into a soup dish, and send 
it to table. If the season of the year will 
admit, a pint of peas boiled in the soup 
will make a material difference. 



A GENERAL STOCK FOR ALL KINDS OF 

SOUPS. 

Cover the bottom of your pot with 
lean ham ; cut it in thin broad slices : the 
quantity of ham depends upon the size of 
the pot ; it is better to put too much than 
too little: be very careful to cut all the 
rusty fat from the lean ; then cut up what 
veal you think requisite, (as the quantity 
must depend upon your judgment,) and 



ROYAL COOK. 



19 



put it in the stock-pot, with the trimmings 
of any other meat you may have by you ; 
throw in all your trimmings of poultry, 
such as necks, gizzards, feet, &c. a few 
onions, a little thyme and parsley, six 
heads of celery, a few blades of mace, two 
or three carrots, and a turnip or two in 
winter, (but not any in the summer, as 
they are sure to make it foment ;) put 
about a pint of water in the pot, and set 
it on a stove not very hot ; draw it down ; 
be careful not let it catch at the bottom, 
as your stock should be light coloured : 
when drawn down, fill it up with beef 
broth ; be careful in skimming it, and do 
not let it boil over ; but as soon as you see 
it coming to boil, take it off, and put it at 
the side ; let it boil very slow, for tw o 
reasons : one is, to keep it clear ; and the 
other, that it should not reduce too much. 
When it has boiled four hours, strain it off, 
and fill up the pot again with w r ater ; let 
it boil all the evening, and strain it off the 
last thing. This is called second stock : 
it serves for gravy, for the larding and 
daubed dishes, &c. 



20 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



COULIS. 

Cut of veal and ham, each an equal 
quantity, and two old fowls, (according' to 
the quantity of coulis you intend to make ;) 
put it into a stewpan, with a few shalots, 
a faggot of parsley, and sweet marjoram, a 
few bay leaves, a few blades of mace, and 
some mushrooms : lay the bottom of the 
stewpan with sheets of fat bacon, if very 
good ; otherwise, fat of ham ; indeed the 
latter is always preferable, when it can be 
had : set it on a stove, with about half a 
pint of stock, and let it draw down gently, 
until it comes to a glaze at the bottom of 
the stewpan, which you may easily know 
by the smell : when down, put about half a 
pint more of stock : when that is'tlown, fill 
up your stewpan with the best stock, and 
let it boil about an hour ; strain it off ; 
(boil the meat again, in some of the second 
stock, and it will make it equal to the first, 
for several uses ;) then take the stewpan, 
and put some butter in it, (at the rate of 
two ounces to a quart of coulis;) let it 
melt ; then put as much flour as will dry 



ItOYAL COOK. 



21 



it up ; keep stirring it over a stove with 
a wooden spoon, (a copper spoon will 
take the tin oft' the stewpan ;) then add 
the coulis stock, by a little at a time, to 
bring it to a proper thickness ; let it boil a 
few minutes, then strain it through a 
tammy into a bason : when strained, put 
the spoon in the sauce, and stir it several 
times, to keep it smooth. 

N. B. In winter, or cold weather, it will 
keep good for a week : in hot weather, it 
will not be good more than three or four 
days. 



SAUCE TOURNEY AND BESHEMELL. 

Lay the bottom of a stewpan with ham, 
cut up two old fowls, and put them to the 
ham ; put as much veal as you think pro- 
per for the quantity you intend making, 
with a few onions, a little thyme and 
parsley, a few blades of mace, and about 
half a pint of white stock, to draw it 
down ; be sure not to let it catch the bot- 
tom of the stewpan : when drawn down, 
fill it up with first stock, and let it boil an 



22 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



hour or better ; then strain it off, and fill 
up your stewpan with water, and it will 
make good broth for many uses ; then put 
some butter into a stewpan, (about the 
same quantity as for the coulis ;) add a 
few mushrooms, shalots, a few slices of 
ham cut in small dice, and about a spoon- 
ful of stock, that you have just strained 
off ; let it boil a few minutes ; set it on a 
stove for about half an hour, so as to get 
all the goodness from the ham ; put flour 
sufficient to thicken it ; then add the stock 
that you have just strained off; let it boil 
a few minutes, and strain it through a 
tammy : to make beshemell, put as much 
cream as will make it of a good wdiite ; it 
should have a little tinge of yellow, which 
is done by adding a small pi£ce of light 
coloured glaze. 

N. B. Beshemell should not boil more 
than one or two minutes, as boiling is very 
apt to spoil the colour. — Those three 
sauces are the ground-work of all made 
dishes. 



110 YAL COOK. 



23 



WHITE BRAISE. 

Take the udder of a leg of veal that 
you have cut a fricando out of, put it in a 
stewpan with cold water, and let it come 
to a boil ; then put it into cold water foi 
a few minutes, and cut it in small pierVv, 
put them into a stewpan, with a small bit 
of butter, onions, a little thyme and parsley, 
a few blades of mace, lemon that is pared 
to the pidp, cut in thin slices, and a spoon- 
ful of water ; put it over a slow stove, and 
keep stirring it for a few minutes ; then 
add a little white stock. As to quantity, 
it must be according to what you want to 
braise ; it is generally used for tenderones 
of lamb, chickens, pigeons, tenderones of 
veal, or any thing you wish to make look 
white. 



BROWN BRAISE. 

Cut some beef suet, trimmings of mut- 
ton cutlets, or any other trimmings ; put 
them into a stewpan, with four onions, a 
faggot of thyme and parsley, basil, mar- 



24 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



joram, mace, and a carrot cut into slices ; 
put it over the fire ; and put a bit of butter, 
a little stock, a few bay leaves, and six 
heads of celery, in the stewpan : let it draw 
down about half an hour, then fill it up 
\ it;} second stock, or weak broth, and add 
a i tie white wine to it. This braise is 
used for beef, mutton, veal, ham, or any 
thing you want to eat mellow. 



DRY BRAISE. 

Put the trimmings of beef, mutton, or 
veal, into a stewpan, (the size according to 
what is intended to be braised,) and a few 
onions, a faggot of sweet herbs, a few 
blades of mace, and a few bay leaves ; put 
as much second stock as will come about 
three parts up to the meat ; then cover the 
meat with sheets of bacon, or the fat of 
ham, if convenient ; then lay on that which 
is intended to be braised. It is the best 
method for doing all larded things ; they 
take rather longer in doing, but eat much 
better ; and the bacon looks better by not 
letting any liquid come near it. 



ROYAL COOK. 



25 



SOUP SANTE. 

Shred turnips, carrots, small onions, 
and Spanish onions (when to be had), cut 
cabbage lettuce, and a pint of asparagus 
peas ; put all into a soup-pot, with a pint 
of stock ; set them an a stove to boil until 
the stock is quite reduced, but not catched ; 
then fill up the pot with good stock, and 
put two small lumps of sugar in, and a 
little salt, if wanted. 



JELLY STOCK. 

Bone four or more calves’ feet, and put 
them into a stewpan that will hold about six 
quarts, (if more than four, a larger in pro- 
portion to the number of calves’ feet ;) let 
them boil gently for four hours, then take 
out the meat part, and put it into cold 
water ; when cold, trim it for any use it is 
intended ; throw the trimmings back into 
the stock ; let it boil until you think it is 
come to its proper strength : it cannot boil 
too long : for four feet you should add two 
quarts of stock. 



c 



26 



THE IMPERIAL AXD 



A GENERAL MEAGRE STOCK, FOR SOUPS, 
SAUCE, AND OTHER USES. 

tt • • 

Cut two large carp into thin pieces; 
two tench, and two eels, in the same man- 
ner ; put about half a pound of butter into 
a soup-pot that will hold- about eight 
quarts ; put in the fish and bones, eighteen 
large onions, a little thyme and parsley, 
eight heads of celery, two carrots, a few 
blades of mace, six bay leaves, two dozen 
of anchovies,' without washing, and about a 
pint of water ; set it on a slow stove, and let 
it draw down gently for two hours; it should 
be quite dry at the bottom before you fill 
it up, then fill it up with hot water ; let it 
boil for three hours ; be sure that it does 
not boil fast ; (the slower all soups boil, the 
better :) strain it through a tammy sieve. 

N. B. Sea fish are equally as good for 
this use, or better. Throw all the bones 
from the fillets into the stock. 



HOT FORCE-MEAT, COMMONLY CALLED 

FARCE. 

Cut veal (according to the quantity you 
want of force-meat, without any sinews,) 



UOYAL COOK. 



27 



into small pieces, and as much fat bacon, 
or fat ham, which is better ; half as much 
marrow, or beef suet ; put it into a stew- 
pan, with a little bit of butter at the bot- 
tom ; season it with chopped parsley, 
mushrooms, (truffles, if you have any,) 
shalot, pepper, and salt, a little Cayenne 
pepper, and a small quantity of pounded 
spice; put it over the fire, and keep stir- 
ring it with a wooden spoon, until the juice 
of the meat begins to run ; let it simmer 
about ten minutes, then put it to cool : 
when cold, put it into a mortar, gravy, fat, 
and all, and let it be well pounded, until it 
is quite fine ; then take it out, and it is fit 
for use. 

N. B. Use half as much lean ham as 
veal, in either hot or cold force-meat. 



COLD FORCE-MEAT FOR BALLS, AND 
OTHER USES. 

The veal should be either scraped, or 
chopped very fine, and be very particular 
about leaving sinews in the veal ; the same 
quantity of scraped bacon, or fat ham ; a 



28 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



little marrow, or suet : put it into the 
mortar, and let it be well pounded ; season 
it with chopped parsley, shalots, mush- 
rooms, pepper, and salt, a little Cayenne 
pepper, and pounded spice : when suffi- 
ciently beaten, put an egg and a few bread 
crumbs, and stir it about to mix it ; take 
it out of the mortar, and make it up into 
balls, or for any other use. 

N. B. You must use more or less egg, 
and bread crumbs, according to the quan- 
tity of force-meat : when you make it up 
in balls, it should be rolled up in flour : 

, when boiled, let the stock be boiling 
before you put the other thing's in. 



EGG BALLS, FOR TURTLE, MOCK 
TURTLE, &c. 

Boil the eggs hard, and put them in 
cold water ; take out the yolks, put them 
in a mortar, and pound them very fine ; 
wet them with raw yolks, (at the rate of 
three raw yolks to eight hard ones,) season 
them with white pepper and salt, dry them 
with flour, and roll them into bails, rather 



ROYAL COOK. 



29 



small, as they swell very much in boiling ; 
boil them in stock for a few minutes. 



PIQUANT SAUCE. 

Put a little chopped shalot into a stew- 
pan, and season with salt : let it boil until 
the stock is boiled away, but not burnt to 
the bottom ; add as much coulis as you 
want sauce ; let it boil a few minutes, 
squeeze a lemon into it, season it with a 
little pepper and salt, a little sugar, and 
two drops of garlic vinegar. 



* POIVRADE SAUCE. 

Run the bottom of a small stewpan witli 
a clove of garlic ; put a small piece of but- 
ter, a few slices of onions, a little stock and 
vinegar, and about twelve grains of old 
pepper ; let it boil down ; add a little flour 
to thicken it, and a little coulis ; strain it 
through a tammy, and squeeze in a lemon. 



y 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



30 



CARROT SAUCE. 

Cut the red part of a large carrot into 
small dice, very neat ; boil them in a little 
best stock until it comes to a glaze, then 
add coulis according to the quantity of 
sauce that is wanted. 



SAUCE HASHIS. 

Cut a few mushrooms, onions, pickled 
cucumbers, walnuts, (first scraping the 
black coat off,) and carrots, into dice ; 
boil them in a little stock, until it comes 
to a glaze ; then add coulis, and let it boil. 



ALEMAND SAUCE. 

Put a little minced ham into a stewpan, 
and a few trimmings of poultry, either 
dressed or undressed ; three or four shalots, 
one very small clove of garlic, a bay leaf, 
two tarragon leaves, and a few spoonfuls 
of stock ; let them simmer for half an 
hour ; strain it off, and add coulis ; squeeze 



ROYAL COOK. 



31 



in a lemon, season with pepper and salt, 
and a little Cayenne pepper and sugar. 



ITALIAN SAUCE, BROWN. 

Put a few chopped truffles and shalots 
into a stewpan, with a slice of ham ; mince 
it very fine, and add a little stock ; let it 
simmer for a quarter of an hour ; put be- 
shemell to it, according to the quantity of 
sauce that is wanted ; let it boil about a 
nr.ffiiiie ; if it should lose its colour, add a 
a little cream, and strain it through a tam- 
my ; season it with a little salt, a few 
drops of garlic vinegar, squeeze of a lemon, 
and a little sugar. 



SORREL SAUCE. 

Chop about four large handfuls of sor- 
rel ; put it into a stewpan, with a small 
piece of butter, a slice of ham, and two 
onions, chopped fine ; put them on a fire 
to simmer for half an hour, then rub it 



32 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



through a tammy, and add a little coulis 
to it; squeeze a lemon, and a Seville 
orange, if to be had ; if not, two lemons ; 
a little pepper, salt, and sugar, to make 

it palatable. Sorrel is generally sour 

enough of itself. 



CHERVIL SAUCE. 

Pick some shervil, leaf by leaf ; put it 
into a small stewpan, with a spoonful of 
best stock ; simmer it till the stewpan be- 
comes dry, then add as much coulis as is 
requisite; squeeze a lemon, put a little 
sugar to make it palatable, and a little 
Madeira. 



SHALOT SAUCE. 

Chop six shalots, put them in the stew- 
pan, with a little stock ; let it simmer for 
a quarter of an hour, add a little coulis, 
squeeze in a lemon, and put a little sugar, 
&c. 



ROYAL COOK. 



S3 



ROYAL SAUCE, EITHER WHITE OR 
BROWN. 

I 

Cut a chicken itito pieces, and about 
half a pound of lean Westphalia ham, six 
or eight shalots, a faggot of parsley, and 
a few blades of mace ; put all into a stew- 
pan, with a little stock to draw it down ; 
when down, add coulis to it, strain it 
through a tammy, season it with lemon, 
&cc. If for white, use beshemell instead 
of coulis. 



FLEMISH SAUCE. 

Boil a sprig of thyme, two shalots, and 
a bit of lemon peel, a few minutes, in a 
small quantity of the best stock ; strain it 
off ; add a little coulis, season with pepper 
and salt, squeeze a lemon, and put a little 
sugar.. 



RAVIGOT SAUCE. 

Put into a stewpan a very small clove 
of garlic, burnet, a few leaves of tarragon, 

c 5 



34 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



a little chopped chalot, chopped mush- 
rooms, truffles, and parsley ; let them sim- 
mer a few minutes in a little very good 
stock ; add as much coulis as is requisite 
for the quantity of sauce wanted ; let it 
boil about a quarter of an hour, then rub 
it through a tammy, put it into a stewpan, 
squeeze a lemon, add a little sugar, pepper, 
and salt. 



SPANISH SAUCE. 

Slice four or five large onions, put 
them into a stewpan, with a little vinegar 
and half a pint of sherry, a small clove of 
garlic, a chopped truffle, a little shalot, 
some ham cut very fine, a bay leaf, a few 
blades of mace, and as much coulis as is 
requisite ; boil all together very slow for a 
quarter of an hour, rub it through a tam- 
my, squeeze a lemon, or orange, if to be 
had ; season with pepper and salt, and a 
little vinegar. 



r 



110 YAL COOK. 



35 



SAUCE A LA REINE. 

Cut up a fowl, half a pound of lean 
ham, six or eight shalots, and a few blades 
of mace ; put them all in a stewpan, with a 
little best stock ; put it on a stove to sim- 
mer about a quarter of an hour, then add 
three pints of stock, boil it for half an 
hour, and strain it off; put about two 
ounces of butter into a stewpan ; when 
melted, add as much flour as will dry it up, 
then add what you have just strained 
off, and about half a pint of cream ; boil it 
for a few minutes, and strain it through a 
tammy. 



CUCUMBER SAUCE. 

Cut the cucumbers, after peeling^ them, 
into quarters ; then cut all the seeds out ; 
cut each quarter into three pieces, and pare 
them round ; peel as many small onions as 
pieces of cucumber ; put them all into a 
little vinegar and water, with a little pep- 
per and salt ; let them lay in it for two 
hours pour off the vinegar and water, and. 
7 



36 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



put as much stock as will barely cover 
them ; boil them down to a glaze, add as 
much coulis as you think proper, let it boil 
for a few minutes, squeeze a lemon, and put 
a little sugar. 



DUTCH SAUCE. 

Slice an onion, put it into a stewpan 
with a little scraped horse-radish, two an- 
chovies, a little elder vinegar, and some 
second stock ; boil it for ten minutes, 
strain it through a hair sieve, return it 
into a stewpan, and make a liaison of two 
* € gg s ; put it to the sauce, and set it on 
the fire to come to a boil. 



MUSHROOMS, EITHER FOR FIRST OR 
SECOND COURSE. 

Pare the mushrooms the same as an 
apple, put them in the water, and squeeze 
a lemon into it ; then put about two ounces 
of butter into a stewpan that will hold 
a quart of mushrooms ; put in the mush- 



ROYAL COOK. 



37 



rooms, with a little pepper and salt, and 
the juice of two lemons ; put them over a 
slow fire to draw down : they discharge a 
great deal of liquor, and should remain on 
the fire until the liquor has boiled away, 
and they become quite dry ; but be careful 
not to let them stick to the bottom of the 
stewpan : when done, put them into sweet- 
meat pots, fill them three parts full, and 
fill the pot up to the top with clarified 
butter, quite hot. 

N. B. The pots will not require to be 
covered over when they are wanted for 
use ; put the mushrooms into a stewpan 
to w r arm, strain the butter from them, and 
put them either into brown or white sauce, 
according to what they are wanted for. 
By following this method, you may have 
mushrooms all the year round. 



TRUFFLES TO KEEP A YEAR, OR MORE. 

Brush the dirt very clean from them 
after washing them in several waters, 
then put them into a stewpan ; put in 



38 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



some very strong stock, and half the quan- 
tity of fat from a brown braise, a quart of 
sherry to about six pounds of truffles, one 
dozen of onions, a faggot of sweet herbs, a 
few blades of mace tied up in the faggot ; 
put the stewpan on a slow stove to boil for 
one hour ; then take them out, and divide 
those which you wish to send for second 
course, which should be the largest and 
roundest ; peel the others, and put them 
in sweet-meat pots, the un peeled the same ; 
skim the fat from the braise, and clarify it ; 
boil the other part to a glaze, pour it over 
the truffles, and then add the fat, while 
quite hot ; the truffles should be entirely 
covered. 

N. B. The reason for peeling the truf- 
fles that are wanted for entres, &c. is, 
that they are ready at a short notice, take 
up less room, and do not waste the glaze 
that they are preserved in ; it is very ex- 
cellent for giving the proper flavour to the 
sauce. 



ROYAL COOK. 



39 



BEEF MADE DISHES. 



OX RUMPS. 

About four ox rumps make a good 
dish ; put them into a brain braise, and 
let them do very slow for about five hours; 
when they are done, put as many bundles 
of cabbage as you think are wanting, (one 
cabbage will make four bundles ;) the cab- 
bage should be three parts boiled, theh 
squeezed very dry with the hand, and 
lastly with a cloth, so as not to leave the 
least drop of water in the cabbage ; tie the 
bundles up with packthread, and put them 
into the braise for one hour ; take them up 
and squeeze the fat from them; put the 
rumps on the dish, and the cabbage round 
them ; either glaze the rumps, or pour 
Spanish sauce on the cabbage. 



BEEF PALATES ROLLED. 

Boil six ox palates in the broth pot 
until nearly done, then take them up, peel 



40 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



and trim them, brush the inside over with 
egg, lay a layer of force-meat on the egg , 
roll them up, and tie them with a string, 
put them into a white braise for about two 
hours, take them out, dry and glaze them i 
make a ragout of the trimmings, and a few 
very small egg balls ; put the ragout on 
the dish first, and the palates on the ragout. 
The, ragout is made as follows : shred the 
palates in neat pieces, and put them into a 
stewpan, with coulis and a glass of sherry 
wine, squeeze either a lemon or orange, a 
few drops of shalot vinegar, and a little 
sugar, salt, and pepper. 



BRISKET OF BEEF STEWED. 

Cut the bone from a brisket of beef, tie 
it up, and put it into a brown braise ; it 
will take about five hours ; put six Spanish 
onions into a stewpan, with some second 
stock, and boil it down to a glaze ; take 
the beef up, trim it neat, and glaze it ; put 
Spanish sauce on the dish, the onions round 
the dish, and the beef in the middle ; the 
onions should be glazed. 



ROYAL COOK. 



41 



A FILLET OF BEEF LAltDED. 

Cut the fillet out of a sirloin of beef, 
trim it, and lard it ; then lay it in a ma- 
rinade, made as follows : — put the fillet, 
after it is larded, in a deep dish, pour about 
half a pint of sallad oil over it, slice four or 
five onions, spread them over the meat, a 
few bay leaves and basil, and over them 
pour half a pint of vinegar ; let it lay in 
this all night, then put it into a braising 
pan (but not a very deep one) with the 
marinade, and about a pint of stock, covered 
with bacon and pepper ; be sure to let it 
simmer very gently ; it will take two 
hours ; when done, pour off the liquor, and 
strain it ; skim the fat from it very clean, 
reduce it to a glaze, and put Spanish sauce 
to it ; boil four Spanish onions until they 
are done, glaze them, and put them round 
the beef when you dish it ; put the sauce 
on the dish first, then glaze the beef, and 
put it on the sauce. 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



42 



PETHS AU GRATIN. 

Peths are taken out of the chine bones 
of beef, mutton, or veal ; put them on to 
blanch ; when come to a boil, take them 
off the fire, and throw them into cold 
water ; wash them, and put them on a 
cloth to dry ; dip them in egg, and then in 
bread crumbs ; do them twice over, and 
have clean lard in a stewpan ; when hot, 
put in the peths, fry them of a light brown, 
and serve them up with fried parsley. 



RUMP OF BEEF A LA MANTUA. 

Trim a rump of beef, daube it, and put 
in a marinade for twelve hours ; then put 
it into a brown braise ; put four large car- 
rots into a braise along with the beef, and 
four bundles of cabbage ; when the beef is 
done, take it up, and put it in the oven for 
a few minutes ; then glaze it ; put sauce 
allemande on the dish and the cabbage, 
and a piece of carrot between each bundle 
of cabbage. 



t 



KOVAL COOK. 



43 



COLLARED BEEF. 

It is made from the fat ribs boned, and 
sprinkled with salt-petre and coarse brown 
sugar, and left so for two days ; then make 
about tw r o pounds of salt quite hot in a 
frying-pan, and rub it well into the beef ; 
let it lay in salt for ten days ; wash it over 
with the pickle every second day, and turn 
it ; put a few bay leaves in the pickle, and 
sprinkle the beef over- with a little fine 
spice about a week before it is boiled ; before 
it is tied up in the cloth to boil, beat it for 
about five minutes upon the chopping-block 
w ith the flat part of the heaviest cleaver you 
have ; this makes it tender, and roll up the 
better, and w r hen boiled will keep its shape ; 
it should be boiled very tender, then taken 
up, and the ends of the cloth wrung quite 
hard, and tied up tighter ; then put it into 
a press with an heavy weight upon it : if 
you have no press, put it in a dish, and 
press it as well as you can, and put the 
weight on it. 

N. B. Two ounces of salt-petre, and 
two ounces of sugar, are quite sufficient. 



44 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



Some use the flank of beef stuffed with 
parsley and ground all-spice. 



BCEUF DE CHASSE. 

Rub two ounces of pounded salt-petre 
well into a round of beef ; put the beef 
into a large pan, or wooden bowl, that will 
just hold it ; let it lay so for two days, then 
make two pounds of salt very hot, and rub it 
on the beef; put about four ounces of good 
coarse moist sugar to the salt : when done, 
put the beef back into the pan or bowl, 
turn it every third day, and rub the brine 
over it every time it is turned ; it should 
remain in salt three weeks ; then skewer it 
up very tight, and bind it with a broad 
fillet ; either bake it or braise it in a 
braising pan that will just hold it; put 
water sufficient to cover it, and about two 
dozen of onions, and six heads of celery, a 
large faggot of thyme and parsley, and 
other sweet herbs, and about three parts of 
beef suet cut fine ; put it over the fire to 
boil very slow for eight hours : put a heavy 



royal cook. 



45 



weight on the lid of the braising pan, other- 
wise the beef will raise the cover off when 
it begins to swell ; it will take equal time 
in an oven ; let it remain in the liquor 
until cold, then take it out and trim it for 
the table. 

N. B. This is more suitable for a 
Christmas dish than for any other time of 
the year. 



' HODGE PODGE. 

* 

Hodge Podge is made as follows : 
bone two fowls, and cut them in quarters; 
cut half a dozen of thick steaks from a 
loin of mutton, and take all the bone out ; 
cut an equal quantity of brisket of beef 
that has been stewed, and about a pound 
of the brisket part of the breast of veal, cut 
in thin slices ; put all into a stewpan, with 
about a pound of lean ham cut the same 
as the veal ; put the ham at the bottom of 
the hot, then the veal and mutton, and the 
fowl and the beef at the top ; put a pint of 
water, and set the stewpan on the fire to 
boil very slow for two hours ; then fill it up 



46 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



with clear second stock or broth ; skim it 
very clean, and let it boil gently by the 
side of a stove for about half an hour ; 
have scooped turnips, carrots, and button 
onions, peeled, three heads of celery cut 
in small pieces : put all into a stewpan, 
with about half a pint of stock, and set 
it on a stove to boil very slowly until the 
stock is reduced ; then fill up the stew- 
pan with stock, and let it boil for a 
few minutes ; then put the roots to the 
meat, and let it boil for a few minutes ; 
put it in the tureen, season it with a little 
salt if wanted, and a little sugar. 



BEEF OLIVES, WITH SAUCE RESTAURET. 

Cut about seven thin slices of beef from 
the rump, the same as you would cut beef 
steaks ; beat them very well with a beater, 
brush them over with egg, and then 
sprinkle them with fine herbs ; season 
them with pepper and salt, roll them up 
quite tight, put a little stock at the bottom 
of a stewpan that will exactly hold them. 



ROYAL COOK. 



47 



(for, by being 1 pressed together, they will 
keep their shape better,) cover them with 
fat bacon cut in sheets, and put paper over 
that; put them on a stove to do very 
gently, the slower the better ; they will 
take full two hours ; take them up, and 
lay six round the dish, and one in the 
middle ; pour sauce restauret over them. 



BEEF PALATES. 

Bon, them till tender, then blanch and 
scrape them ; rub them over with mace, 
nutmeg, cloves, and pepper, mixed with 
crumb of bread ; put them into the stew- 
pan with hot butter, and fry them brown 
on both sides ; pour off the fat ; put as 
much beef and mutton gravy into a stewpan 
as if for sauce, an anchovy, a little lemon- 
juice, salt to make it palatable, and a piece 
of butter rolled in flour ; when these have 
simmered a quarter of an hour, dish them 
up, and garnish with slices of lemon. 



48 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



TRIPE. 

Cut it into small square pieces ; put 
them into your stewpan, with as much 
white wine as will cover them, white 
pepper, grated ginger, a blade of mace, 
rweet herbs, and an onion ; stew it a 
quarter of an hour ; take out the herbs and 
onion, and put in a little chopped parsley, 
the juice of a lemon, half an anchovy cut 
small, a gill of cream, and either the yolk 
of an egg, or a piece of butter ; season to 
your taste, and garnish with lemon. 



STEWED BEEF. 

Take a piece of fat beef, cut the meat 
from the bones, flour and fry it in a large 
stewpan, with butter, till brown; then 
cover it in the pan with a gravy made in 
the following manner: take a pound of 
coarse beef, half a pound of veal cut small, 
sweet herbs, and onions, whole black and 
white pepper, mace, cloves, a piece of 
carrot, and a slice of lean bacon, (steep it 
in vinegar,) a crust of bread toasted brown, 
6 



ROYAL COOK. 



49 



and a quart of white wine ; let it boil till 
it is half wasted ; pour a quart of boiling 
water into the stewpan ; let it stew gently : 
as soon as the gravy is made, pour it into 
the stewpan with the beef : take an ounce 
of truffles and morels, cut small, with some 
fresh or dried mushrooms, and two spoon- 
fuls of catsup ; cover it close, and let it stew 
till the sauce is thick and rich ; have ready 
some artichoke bottoms, quartered, and a 
few pickled mushrooms ; boil the whole 
together ; lay the meat in a dish, pour the 
.sauce over it, and serve it hot. 



ROUND OF BEEF FORCED. 

Rub the meat first with common salt, 
then with bay salt, salt-petre, and coarse 
sugar ; lay it a week in this pickle, turning 
it every day ; when to be dressed, wash, 
drv, and lard it a little ; make holes, and 
fill them with stuffing of bread, marrow, or 
suet, parsley, grated lemon-peel, sweet 
lierbs, pepper, salt, nutmeg, and the yolk 
of an ogg ; bake it in water and small beer 

D 



50 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



whole pepper, and onion : when done, skim 
off the fat, put the meat into a dish, and 
pour the liquor over it. 



BEEF A LA MODE. 

The small buttock, leg-of-mutton -piece, 
the clod, or a part of a large buttock, are 
all proper for this purpose : take either of 
these, with two dozen of cloves, mace in 
proportion, and half an ounce of all-spice 
beat fine ; chop a large handful of parsley, 
and all sorts of sweet herbs, very fine ; 
cut some fat bacon as long as the beef is 
thick, and about a quarter 6f an inch 
square, and put it into the spice, &c. and 
the beef into the same ; put the beef into a 
pot, and cover it with water ; chop four 
large onions very fine, and six cloves of 
garlic, six bay leaves, and an handful of 
champignons, or fresh mushrooms ; put all 
into the pot, with a pint of strong beer, and 
half a pint of red wine ; put pepper, salt, 
Cayenne pepper, and a spoonful of vinegar ; 
strew three handfuls of bread raspins, sifted 



ROYAL COOK. 



51 



fine, otfer all ; cover close, and stew it for 
six or eight hours, according to the size of 
the piece ; then take the beef out, put it 
into a deep dish, and keep it hot ; strain 
the gravy through a sieve, and pick out 
the champignions, or mushrooms ; skim off 
all the fat, put it into your pot again, and 
give it a boil up ; season it to your liking ; 
then put your gravy over your beef, and 
send it hot to table. If you prefer it cold, 
cut it in slices, with the gravy over it, and 
it will be a strong jelly. 



TONGUE AND UDDER FORCED. 

Parboil and blanch your tongue, stick 
it full of cloves, and fill the udder with 
force-meat made of veal: first wash the 
inside with the yolk of an egg, put in the 
force-meat, tie the ends close, spit it, roast 
it, and baste it with butter : when done, 
put good gravy into the dish, and serve it 
with sweet sauce. 



52 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A FRICANDEAU OF BEEF. 

Cut some slices of beef five or six inches 
long, and half an inch thick ; lard them 
*%ith bacon, drudge with flour, and set it 
before a brisk fire to brown ; then put it in 
a tossing-pan, with a quart of good stock, 
some morels and truffles, and half a lemon ; 
stew them half an hour ; add one spoonful 
of catsup, the same of browning, and a 
little Cayenne pepper ; thicken your sauce, 
pour it over, and lay force-meat balls and 
the yolks of hard eggs round it. 



PORTUGAL BEEF. 

Take out the bone of a rump of beef, 
cut it across, flour it, and fry the thin part 
in butter; stuff the thick end with suet, 
boiled cliesnuts, an anchovy, an onion, and 
pepper ; stew it in a pan of good stock, 
and, when tender, lay the stewed part in a 
dish, cut the fried in two, and lay on each 
side of the stew ; strain the gravy it was 
stewed in, put to it girkins chopped, and 



ROYAL COOK. 



515 



boiled chesnuts, thicken with butter rolled 
in flour, add a spoonful of browning', boil 
it up, season with salt, and pour it over the 
beef : garnish with lemon. 



BEEF A LA VINGRETTE. 

Cut a slice, three inches thick, from a 
round of beef, with some fat to it ; stew it 
in a quart of second stock, and add a glass 
of white wine ; season with salt, pepper, 
cloves, sweet herbs, and a bay leaf; boil it 
till the liquor is nearly gone, and send it to 
table cold. 



BEEF STEAKS ROLLED. 

Flatten three or four beef steaks, then 
make a force-meat, beat a pound of veal 
in a mortar, half a pound of cold ham, the 
kidney fat of a loin of lamb, chopped with 
sweetbread cut in pieces, an ounce of 
truffles and morels, first stewed, and then 
cut small, some parsley, the yolks of four 
eggs, a nutmeg grated, lemon-peel cut fine, 
pepper, salt, and half a pint of cream ; 



54 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



mix all together, lay it on your steaks, roll 
them up tight of a good size, and confine 
them with a small skewer ; put them into 
a stewpan, and fry them of a nice brown ; 
skim off all the fat, and put in a pint of 
good fried gravy ; to which add one spoon- 
ful of catsup, two of red wine, and a few 
mushrooms ; let them stew half an hour, 
then take up the steaks, cut them in two, 
lay the outside uppermost, and pour the 
sauce over them : garnish with lemon. 



A RUMP OF BEEF A LA DAUBE, AND 
CABBAGE. 

Trim a rump of beef, and daube it ; put 
it in a marinade the night before, and then 
put it on in a brown braise ; it will take 
four hours ; (remember that it must do 
very slow) : about an hour before it is 
wanted put in about six bundles of savoy 
cabbage ; the cabbage should be about half 
boiled in water, then squeezed very dry, 
and tied up in bundles ; put Spanish sauce 
on the dish, the cabbage round, and the 
beef in the middle : garnish with carrot. 

N. B. The beef should be glazed. 



ROYAL COOK. 



55 



MUTTON MADE DISHES. 



SOUTIES OF MUTTON AND CUCUMBERS. 

Cut a neck or loin of mutton into cut- 
lets, butter a soutiespan, and sprinkle it over 
with a shalot, parsley, pepper, salt, and 
chopped mushrooms ; put the cutlets to 
pass off; when done, lay them round the 
side of the stewpan ; put a little stock in 
the middle, and a sheet of white paper, cut 
round, over the cutlets ; they will take one 
hour over a slow stove ; dish them round 
a dish, the cucumber sauce in the middle. 

N. B. Bone the mutton before you cut 
it up. 



SHEEPS' RUMPS AND KIDNEYS. 

Bone four rumps, or more, (properly 
called tails,) fill them with force-meat, and 
put them in a white braise ; split four 
kidneys, and put them into the braise ; 
put them on a slow stove, to simmer gently 



56 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



for two hours ; put piquant sauce on the 
dish, the rumps round the sides, and kid- 
neys in the middle. 

N. B. The rumps should be glazed, and 
a little sauce poured over the kidneys. 



SHEEP’S TROTTERS IN GRATIN. 

Boil them in water, and then put them 
into a stewpan with half a pint of white 
wine, half a pint of second stock, as much 
coulis, a faggot of sweet herbs, with salt, 
whole pepper, and mace ; stew them by a 
slow fire till the sauce is reduced, and 
serve them upon a gratin. Sheep’s trot- 
ters may be served with a ragout of cucum- 
bers. 



A LEG OF MUTTON ROASTED WITH 
OYSTERS. 

Stuff a leg of mutton that has hung 
up two or three days all over with oysters ; 
roast if; and, when done, pour good gravy 
into a dish : garnish with horse-radish. 



ROYAL COOK. 



57 



SHOULDER OF MUTTON CALLED HEN 
AND CHICKENS. 

Half roast a shoulder of mutton, then 
cut off the blade at the first joint, and both 
the flaps, to make the blade round ; score 
the blade round in diamonds, put pepper 
and salt over it, and set it in a Dutch 
oven to broil ; cut the flaps of meat off the 
shank in thin slices, and put the gravy that 
comes out of the mutton into a stewpan, 
with a little good stock, two spoonfuls of 
walnut catsup, one of browning, a little 
Cayenne pepper, and one or two shalots : 
when the meat is tender, thicken it with 
flour and butter, put it into the dish with 
the gravy, and lay the blade on the top : 
garnish with green pickles. 



OXFORD JOHN. 

Cut very thin col lops from a leg of 
mutton, and take out all the sinews and 
fat ; season with pepper, salt, and mace, 
and strew over a little parsley and two or 
three shalots ; put a lump of butter into a 

D 5 



58 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



stewpan, and when it is hot put in the 
collops ; stir them with a wooden spoon 
till three parts done, then add half a pint 
of stock and a little lemon-juice; thicken 
with flour and butter ; let them simmer 
for four or five minutes, when they will 
be done : put them into a dish, with the 
sauce, and throw fried pieces of bread, cut 
in dice, over and round them : garnish 
with pickles. 



MUTTON RUMPS BRAISED. 

Boil six rumps for a quarter of an 
hour; take them out, cut them in two, 
and put them into a stewpan, with a little 
stock, a gill of white wine, an onion stuck 
with cloves, salt, and Cayenne pepper; 
cover them close, and stew them till tender ; 
take them and the onion out ; thicken the 
gravy with butter rolled in flour, a spoon- 
ful of browning, and the juice of half a 
lemon; boil it till smooth, but not too 
thick; put in the rumps, give them a 
shake or two, and dish them up hot : gar- 
nish with horse-radish and beat-root. 



ROYAL COOK. 



59 



N. B. For a change, the rumps may be 
left whole, and six kidneys larded on one 
side, and done the same as the rumps, but 
not boiled ; put the rumps in the middle 
of the dish, with kidneys round them, and 
sauce over them. 



HARICOT OF MUTTON. 

Take off some of the fat of the middle 
or best end of the neck, cut it into thin 
steaks, put the fat into a frying-pan, flour, 
and fry them lightly of a fine light brown, 
then put them into a dish, while you fry 
carrots, turnips, and sliced onions ; lay the 
steaks at the bottom of a stewpan, the vege- 
tables over them, and cover them with 
boiling water ; give them one boil, skim, 
and then set the pan on the side/)f the fire, 
to simmer gently till tender ; skim off all 
the fat ; add pepper, salt, and a spoonful 
of catsup ; send them to table hot. 



60 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



CHINA CHILO. 

Mince a basonful of undressed neck of 
mutton, with fat to it; put two onions, a 
lettuce, a pint of green peas, salt, pepper, 
four spoonfuls of water, and some clarified 
butter, into a stewpan closely covered ; 
simmer two hours, and serve it in the 
middle of a dish ; boil dry rice ; and 
Cayenne pepper, if approved of. 



LAMB MADE DISHES.. 



LOIN OF LAMB BRAISED, AND CELERY 

SAUCE. 

Bone a loin of lamb, lay the bottom of 
a stewpan with fat bacon, and lay the 
lamb in ; put a few onions, bits of carrots, 
a little parsley, and a few blades of mace 
tied up with it ; cover the lamb with fat 
bacon and paper, put about a pint of stock, 
set^it on the fire, and let it do very gently 
for about two hours ; take it up, dry it, 



ROYAL COOK. 



61 



and glaze it ; put the celery on the dish 
first, and the lamb upon the celery. 



A SHOULDER OF LAMB LARDED. 

Take the blade out of a shoulder of 
lamb, fill it with force-meat, sew it up with 
twine, and then lard it ; put the trimmings 
of any sort of meat into a stewpan, with 
onions, celery, a faggot, and bits of carrots ; 
put the lamb upon those, cover it with fat 
bacon, put a quart of second stock, and let 
it do very gently for two hours ; put a 
little lighted charcoal upon the lid of the 
stewpan, to raise the bacon ; when done, 
take it up, and put it in the oven for a few 
minutes ; put sorrel sauce on the dish, and 
then the lamb. 



TWO NECKS OF LAMB CHEVAUX DE 
FRISE. 

Trim two necks of lamb very neatly, 
strip and scrape the bones very clean from 
the meat ; lard the fillet part, which is the 
lean, the length of the neck ; the fat at the 



62 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



best end to be taken equal to the lean of 
the other end ; braise them in a dry 
braise ; when done, take them up, and put 
the bones one within the other ; put them 
in the oven for a few minutes, glaze them, 
and put cucumber sauce in the dish, and 
then the lamb. 



LAMBS’ FEET, WITH ASPARAGUS PEAS. 

It will take twelve lambs’ feet to make 
a corner dish ; they are had ready scalded 
from the butcher ; take the worm from 
between the hoof first, and then loosen the 
skin and gristle from the shank-bone ; then 
put them on in cold water ; let them boil 
until the shank-bone will draw out ; then 
cover the bottom of a stewpan with sheets 
of bacon ; put in the lambs’ feet, and two 
lemons peeled and sliced, and half a pint 
of second stock ; cover the feet over with 
bacon and paper, and set the stewpan on a 
stove, to simmer very gently for an hour : 
when done, take them up, and lay them on 
a clean cloth to dry ; then lay them round 
the dish, and put the asparagus peas over 



ROYAL COOK. 



63 



the feet ; the asparagus should be put into 
a stewpan, with as much stock as will 
barely cover them, and set on a stove to 
boil until the stock is quite reduced, (but 
not to burn to the bottom ;) then put 
beshemell according to what is wanted ; 
set it by the side of a stove to make hot, 
but not to boil, as it would spoil the colour 
of the sauce by boiling. 



LAMB CUTLETS LARDED, BREAST 
ROLLED, AND FRENCH BEANS. 

Lard eight lamb cutlets, blanch them 
off, and lay bacon on the bottom of a stew- 
pan ; put the cutlets in, and about half a 
pint of stock ; cover them with sheets of 
bacon, and put paper over them ; bone the 
breast of lamb, beat it with a flatter, brush 
it over with egg, sprinkle a little pepper 
and salt over it, and spread some good 
force-meat over it ; roll it up, and tie it up 
with pack-thread ; put it into a white 
braise ; it will take about two hours ; then 
take it up, dry it with a cloth, and glaze 
7 



64 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



it ; take the cutlets up, and put them in 
the oven for a few minutes ; then glaze 
them, and put the French beans on the 
dish, the cutlets round the dish, and the 
breast of lamb in the middle. 



TUREEN OF LAMBS’ TAILS. 

Lambs’ tails are had from the butcher 
ready scalded ; they should be blanched off, 
and then put into a white braise ; when 
very tender, take them up, cut them into 
lengths of about two inches, and put them 
into a small soup-pot until you want them ; 
lay the bottom of a stewpan with lean 
ham ; cut up two old fowls, and put them 
to the ham, with four large onions, a fag- 
got, and a few blades of mace : put in half 
a pint of water ; put the stewpan on the 
fire, to draw down very slow for one hour, 
(be careful that it does not catch at the 
bottom ;) then put two quarts of stock ; 
let it boil for an hour, but very slow, so 
that it does not waste by boiling ; strain it, 
and skim the fat off quite clean ; boil one 



ROYAL COOK. 



65 



pint of asparagus peas in some of the stock 
that the old fowls were boiled in : when 
done, put asparagus peas, and the remain- 
der of the stock, to the lambs’ tails, and 
set the soup-pot at the side of a stove, to 
boil for a few minutes ; make a liaison of 
four yolks of eggs, and one pint of cream 
that has boiled ; when strained, put a pint 
of beshemell to the liaison ; take the soup 
from the fire, and put the liaison in ; keep 
stirring it all the while ; then put it on the 
fire until it begins to come to a boil ; be 
sure to keep stirring the soup during the 
time it is on the fire : if it should be ready 
before it is wanted, put the soup-pot into a 
stewpan of hot water, and set it on the 
side of a stove. 



QUARTER OF LAMB FORCED. 

Cut a long slit in a large leg of lamb, 
and take out the meat ; the front of it 
must not be defaced ; chop the meat small, 
with marrow, beef suet, oysters, washed 
anchovy, an onion, sweet herbs, lemon-peel 
beaten, mace, and nutmeg ; beat all toge- 



66 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



ther in a mortar, stuff the leg in its origi- 
nal shape, sew it up, rub it over with yolks 
of eggs, and roast it for an hour, basting 
it with butter : cut the loin into steaks, 
season them with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, 
lemon-peel cut fine, and a few herbs ; fry 
them in fresh butter, of a fine brown ; pour 
out the butter, put in a quarter of a pint of 
white wine, and add half a pint of strong 
stock, a quarter of a pint of oysters, with 
their liquor, some mushrooms, a spoonful 
of pickle, butter rolled in flour, and the 
yolk of an egg : stir all together till thick, 
then lay your leg of lamb in the dish, and 
lay the steaks round it ; pour the sauce 
over it : garnish with lemon. 



A LEG OF LAMB AND HARICOT BEANS. 

A leg of lamb will take one hour and a 
half to roast ; put the haricot beans in the 
dish first. 

N. B. Butter, salt, and flour the lamb. 



AND ROYAL COOK. 



67 



CHINE OF LAMB, AND CUCUMBER 
SAUCE. 

Tie the lamb on a spit, butter, salt, and 
paper it ; put it to the fire, and baste it 
well ; it will take one hour and a half ; 
put the sauce on the dish, and the lamb 
upon it. 



VEAL MADE DISHES. 



VEAL OLIVES. 

Cut six slices off a fillet of veal; let 
them be about ten inches long, and about 
four inches wide ; beat them with a flatter, 
to make them thin ; brush them over with 
an egg, (beat up white and yolks together ;) 
spread a layer of force-meat, and brush 
them over with egg; roll them up quite 
close, and lay them in a stewpan that will 
just hold them ; lay lairs of bacon on the 
bottom of the stewpan, and lay the olives 
on the bacon ; put a few spoonfuls of good 



68 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



stock, and cover them over with lairs of 
bacon ; let them do gently for one hour ; 
then take them out, and dry them with a 
cloth ; put them on a dish, and pour a 
sharp sauce over them. 



A BREAST OF VEAL RAGOUTED 
WHOLE. 

Cut the chine bone from a breast of 
veal, then cut the tenderones out, (as they 
will do for another dish,) cover the bottom 
of a stewpan with fat bacon, lay the veal 
in, put three onions, a blade of mace, and 
parsley ; cover it over with bacon, and 
then with white paper ; put about three 
pints of second stock ; put it on a slow 
stove to simmer for about two hours and a 
half ; take it up, pull all the bones from it, 
dish it, and put a ragout of sweet-bread, 
mushrooms, and force-meat balls, over the 
veal. The ragout is made as follows : — 
put a few mushrooms into a stewpan, with 
a small quantity of butter, a little pepper 
and salt, and half a lemon squeezed ; put 
it on a slow stove for a quarter of an hour. 



ROYAL COOK. 



69 



or until the mushrooms are done ; cut two 
long sweetbreads in slices, put them to the 
mushrooms, and about two dozen of force- 
meat balls, and one dozen of egg balls ; 
put sauce tourney as much as you think 
will do ; add two glasses of Madeira ; and 
the braise strained, skimmed, and boiled 
down to a glaze, answers two purposes ; 
first, it gives a right flavour to the ragout ; 
next the glaze gives it a fine gold colour. 



TENDRONES OF VEAL. 

Tenderones of veal are the gristle- 
bone of the breast of veal ; cut it into thin 
slices, and put them into a stewpan, with 
cold water; put them on the stove to 
blanch ; take them off when they come to 
boil ; put them into a white braise ; let 
them simmer for four hours, by which time 
they will be tender ; take them up, and lay 
them on a clean cloth to dry the fat from 
them ; cut some braised truffles into slices, 
and put them into a coulis ; add a little 
white wine, and a bit of truffle glaze, 



70 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



squeeze an orange, and put a little bit of 
sugar ; dish them round a dish, and put 
the truffles in the middle. Garnish with 
croutons of bread and paste, or a slice of 
truffle between every tenderone. 



A LOIN OF VEAL A LA BESHEMELL. 

Put a loin of veal on the spit, (first 
cutting the chump end off, as that makes a 
fricandeau, or a la daube) do it over with 
oiled butter, sprinkle it with salt, paper it 
* with double paper, tie it on with pack- 
thread, and put it to the fire ; it will take 
two hours, or more, according to the size ; 
when done, take it up, lay the kidney side 
on a dish, (not the one that is to be served 
upon) ; cut out a fillet, leaving about an 
inch at each end, and either mince it or cut 
it into collops ; put some good beshemell to 
it, season it with a little garlic vineg’ar, 
pepper, salt, lemon, and sugar; put the 
mince, or collops, into the place where you 
cut the fillet from ; put bread crumbs over 
it, and a little clarified butter : put it in 



ROYAL COOK. 



71 



the oven for a few minutes, and brown it 
with a salamander ; put beshemell on the 
dish, and the veal upon the sauce. 

N. B. A loin or neck of veal, that has 
been served up, and not cut, will answer 
the same purpose as well as a fresh roasted 
one, by papering it, and putting it in the 
oven to make hot. 



A ROULARD OF VEAL AND MUSHROOMS. 

Bone a breast of veal, and beat it with 
a beater or chopper, (the more it is beat, 
the better it will keep its shape when rol- 
led) ; brush it over with an egg beat up 
together; season it with pepper, spread 
some good force-meat over it, and egg the 
force-meat ; roll the veal up with twine, 
and put it in a braise ; it will take two 
hours or more : if there should be a ham or 
rump of beef braising, put the veal in the 
same pan ; when done, take off the twine, 
but leave the skewers in, only put them out 
of sight ; glaze it, and put the mushrooms 
under it. 



72 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



N. B. Sorrel, white haricot beans, 
French beans, Spanish sauce, haricot roots, 
stewed cucumbers, &c. will answer as well 
as the mushrooms. 



WHITE COLLOPS AND CUCUMBERS. 

Cut the collops about half the size of a 
crown-piece, flat them, and put them on a 
souties-pan that has been buttered ; put 
them over a stove for a few minutes, turn 
them, take them off, and put them into 
some hot beshemell ; the cucumbers should 
be cut in quarters, and the seeds taken out ; 
make two pieces of each quarter, let them 
lay in vinegar and water (with pepper and 
salt) about an hour before they are put on 
the fire; then put them into a stewpan, 
with a few spoonfuls of stock and a bit of 
butter ; let them do gently till they are 
done, then put them to the collops. 

N. B. The collops should be sprinkled 
with shalot and parsley, chopped very fine 
before they are put on the stove. 



KOVAL COOK. 



73 



A FILLET OF. VEAL A LA FLAMOND. 

Daub a fillet of veal with bacon* rolled 
well in fine herbs and fine spices ; cover it 
with bacon and paper ; either roast or 
braise it, ( it eats better roasted) ; it will 
take two hours and a half either to roast or 
braise ; if braised, put a pint of sherry in 
the braise, and pour sauce flamond over the 
veal. 



BREAST OF VEAL A LA FLAMOND. 

Cover the bottom of a stewpan with 
bacon, put the veal in, and cover it with 
lairs of bacon ; add a pint of stock and a 
pint of white wine ; set it on a slow stove 
for two hours, or until the bones will part 
from the meat; take it up, strain the 
liquor that the veal was stewed in, and 
skim it ; make the sauce from that ; add 
mushrooms, squeeze a lemon, put a little 
shalot vinegar, and a little dust of sugar ; 
dish the veal, and pour the sauce over it. 



E 



74 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A NECK OF VEAL BRAISED, AND SAUCE 
A LA REINE. 

Trim a neck of veal, by cutting off the 
chine bone, and cutting the rib bones short ; 
set it on the fire in cold water to blanch ; 
when it comes to a boil, take it off and 
throw it into cold water ; lay the bottom 
of the stewpan with sheets of bacon, put 
the veal in, and cover it with bacon ; put 
in a few onions, a faggot, a few blades of 
mace, a bit or two of carrot, and one quart 
of stock ; cover it with paper, and set it on 
the fire ; it will take two hours to do ; 
when done, take it up, dry it, and put the 
sauce over it. 



A SOUTIES OF SWEETBREADS, AND 
PIQUANT SAUCE. 

Cut two long sweetbreads that are about 
half done into thin slices ; butter a souties- 
pan, and sprinkle it with chopped parsley, 
shalot, truffles or mushrooms, and a little 
pepper and salt ; lay the sweetbreads on, 
and set them over a stove to simmer for five 
or six minutes ; then turn them, and let 



ROYAL COOK. 



79 



i % 

SWEETBREADS OF VEAL A LA DAUPHINE. 

Take three of the largest sweetbreads 
you can get, and open them in such a man- 
ner that you can stuff in force-meat ; make 
your force-meat with a large fowl, or a 
young cock ; skin it, and pick off all the 
flesh ; then take half a pound of fat and 
lean bacon, cut it very fine, and beat them 
in a mortar ; season it with an anchovy, 
some nutmeg, a little lemon-peel, a little 
thyme, and some parsley : mix these up 
with the yolks of two eggs ; fill your 
sweetbreads with it, and fasten them toge- 
ther with fine wooden skewers ; put lairs 
of bacon at the bottom of the stewpan, and 
season them with pepper, salt, mace, cloves, 
sweet herbs, and a large onion sliced ; lay 
upon this thin slices of veal, and then your 
sweetbreads ; cover it close ; let it stand 
eight er ten minutes over a slow fire, and 
then pour in a quart of boiling water or 
broth ; let it stew gently for two hours, 
then take out the sweetbreads, keep them 
hot, strain the gravy, skim all the fat off, 
and boil it up till it is reduced to about 



80 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



half a pint ; then put in the sweetbreads, 
and let them stew two or three minutes in 
the gravy ; lay them in a dish, and pour 
the gravy over them : garnish with lemon. 



GERMAN WAY OF DRESSING A CALF’S 

HEAD. 

Take a large calf’s head, with great 
part of the neck cut with it split it in 
half, scald it very white, and take out the 
jaw-bone ; take a large stewpan, and lay 
at the bottom some slices of bacon, then 
some thin beef steaks, with some pepper 
and salt ; then lay in the head, pOur in 
some stock, large onions stuck with cloves, 
and a bunch of sweet herbs ; cover the 
stewpan very close, and set it over the 
stove to stew ; then make a ragout with a 
quart of good beef gravy, and half a pint 
of red wine ; let the wine be well boiled in 
the gravy ; add to it some sweetbreads 
parboiled and cut in slices, some coxcombs, 
oysters, mushrooms, truffles, and morels ; 
take it up, put it into a dish, take out the 



t 



ROYAL COOK. 81 



brains, the eyes, and the bones ; then slit 
the tongue, cut it into small pieces ; cut 
the eyes in pieces also, and chop the brains ; 
put this into a baking dish, and pour some 
of the ragout over them ; then take the 
head, lay it upon the ragout, pour the rest 
over it, and on that some melted butter ; 
then scrape some fine Parmesan cheese, 
strew it over with butter, and send it to 
the oven; it does not want much baking, 
but only requires to be made a nice brown. 



CALF’S PLUCK. 

Roast a calf’s heart, stuffed with suet,, 
sweet herbs, and parsley, crumbs of bread, , 
pepper, salt, nutmeg, and a little lemon- 
peel, all mixed together, with the yolk of 
an egg; boil the lights, and part of the 
liver when done ; chop them small, and 
put them into a saucepan, with butter 
rolled in flour, some pepper, salt, and lemon- 
juice ; fry the other part of the liver, with 
some thin slices of bacon ; lay the mince at 
the bottom of the dish, lay the heart in the 

E 5 



82 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



middle, and the fried liver and bacon 
round it, with crisped parsley : serve it 
with plain melted butter. 



PILLOW OF VEAL. 

Have roasted a breast or neck of veal, 
cut it into chops, and season it with pep- 
per, salt, and nutmeg ; put a pound of rice 
into a quart of stock, some mace, and a 
little salt ; stew it very gently, till thick, 
but butter the boom of the pan you do it 
in ; beat up the yolks of six eggs and stir 
them in ; then take a small deep dish, 
butter it, and lay some of the rice at the 
bottom ; then lay the veal in a heap, and 
cover it with rice ; rub it over with yolks 
of eggs, and bake it an hour and a half ; 
then open the top, and pour in a pint of 
rich gravy ; send it hot to table : garnish 
with Seville orange cut in quarters. 



ROYAL COOK. 



83 



SCOTCH, OR SCORCHED COLLOPS. 

Cut the collops off' the thick part of a 
leg of veal, of about the size of a crown- 
piece ; put a piece of butter into your 
frying-pan, then lay in your collops, and 
fry them over a quick fire ; shake, turn, 
and keep them in a fine froth ; when they 
are of a nice brown, take them out, and 
put them into a pot ; then put cold butter 
again into your pan, and fry the collops as 
before ; when they are done, and properly 
browned, pour the liquor from them into a 
stewpan, and add to it half a pint of stock, 
half a lemon, an anchovy, half an ounce of 
morels, a spoonful of browning, one of cat- 
sup, and two of lemon-pickle ; season to 
your taste with salt and Cayenne pepper ; 
thicken with butter and flour ; let it boil 
five or six minutes ; put in your collops, 
and shake them over the fire, but do not 
let them boil ; when they have simmered a 
little, take them out, and lay them in the 
dish ; strain your sauce, and pour it hot 
on them ; lay on them force-meat balls, 
and small slices of bacon curled round with 



84 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



4 • 

a skewer and boiled; add a few mush- 
rooms, and garnish with lemon. 



TUREEN OF CALVES’ TEET AND ASPA- 
RAGUS PEAS. 

Bone the calves’ feet, and put them on 
for jelly stock ; when the feet are quite 
tender, take them up, and put them in cold 
water ; when cold, trim them, and cut 
them in small pieces, and put them on a 
cloth to dry ; put a quart of asparagus peas 
on to boil in about a quart of stock ; set 
them on a slow stove ; when the peas are 
quite tender, put them, with the stock that 
they were boiled in, into a small soup-pot, 
and three pints of stock ; give it a boil up, 
and then put in the calves’ feet, and set the 
soup-pot by the side of the fire to keep hot, 
but not to boil; make a liaison of four 
eggs, and put about a pint of beshemell in 
the liaison ; put the liaison in the soup, and 
set the soup over the fire until it begins to 
come to a boil ; keep stirring it all the time, 
otherwise it will curdle: if the soup is 

6 



ROYAL COOK. 



85 



ready too soon, put the soup-pot into a 
stewpan of hot water to keep it hot ; season 
it with a little salt, if wanted, and a lump 
of sugar. 



PORK MADE DISHES. 



A FILLET OF PORK. 

Bone either a neck or a loin of pork, 
and cut the rind off ; put some second 
stock into a stewpan, with fat from any 
braise you have by you ; put the pork into 
the stewpan, cover it with onions and sage, 
sprinkle it with salt, and lay the rind over 
it ; it will take three hours ; take it up, 
dry the fat from it, and glaze it; put sauce 
rober on the dish, and the pork on it i 
garnish with either paste or croutons. 



A HAM BRAISED. 

Put the ham into warm water to soak 
the day before it is w r anted to be dressed ; 



86 * 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



put it on to boil in cold water ; let it boil 
about twenty minutes ; take it up, take off 
the rind, and trim it ; put it into a good 
brown braise, and a pint of sherry in the 
braise ; put it on a slow stove, (the braising 
pan should be covered down very close) 
and boil as gently as possible for four hours, 
more or less, according to the size of the 
ham ; when done, take it up, trim and 
glaze it ; put either spinage, greens, beans, 
or coulis, according to the time of the year. 



A LEG OF PORK A LA BOlSSEAU. 

A leg of pork for this purpose should 
be in salt about four days, and put in boil- 
ing water to boil for about ten minutes ; 
then take it up and skin it ; spit it, and 
put it to the fire ; it will take two hours to 
roast ; about half an hour before it is taken 
up shake on plenty of bread crumbs, then 
baste it with butter, put on more bread 
crumbs, and repeat basting, and put in 
bread crumbs until it looks of a nice 
brown ; take it up, and put under it a little 
7 



V 



ROYAL COOK. 87 



sage, an onion chopped very fine, and 
boiled in good gravy ; send ample sauce in 
' a boat. 



A PIG AU PERE DUILLET. 

Cut off the head, and divide the body 
into quarters ; lard them with bacon, and 
season them well with pepper, salt, nut- 
megs, cloves, and mace ; put a lair of fat 
bacon at the bottom of a stewpan, lay the 
head in the middle, and the quarters round 
it ; then put in a bay leaf, an onion, a 
shred, a lemon, some carrots, parsley, and 
the liver, and cover it again with bacon ; 
put in a quart of second stock ; stew it for 
an hour, then take it up, put your pig into 
a stewpan, pour in a bottle of white wine, 
cover it close, and let it stew very gently 
an hour ; in the meantime, while it is 
stewing in the wine, take the first gravy 
that it w r as stewed in, skim off the fat, and 
strain it ; then take a sweetbread cut into 
five or six pieces, some truffles, morels, and 
mushrooms, and stew all together till they 
are done ; thicken it with the yolks of two 



I 



88 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



eggs, or a piece of butter rolled in flour ; 
when your pig" is done, take it out, and lay 
it in the dish ; put the wine it was stewed 
in to the sauce, then pour it all over the 
pig : garnish with lemon. 



SICILIAN MANNER OF DRESSING LOIN OF 
PORK TO EAT LIKE WILD BOAR. 

Cut the loin of porjk as you would for 
chops ; leave the end bones whole to keep 
it together, put chopped sage betwixt the 
cuts, and soak the meat in equal quantities 
of vinegar and water for ten or twelve day 5 : ; 
then put more sage, tie it up close, and bake 
it, with the skin downwards, in some 
of the vinegar and water ; when done, 
serve it up with its own liquor skimmed, a 
little sugar, and a glass of red wine : it 
may also be eaten with currant jelly sauce; 
the skin, instead of being hard and crack- 
ling, becomes a fine rich brawny jelly.. 



ROYAL COOK. 



89 



BARBECUED PIG. 

Prepare a young pig as for roasting ; 
make a force-meat of two anchovies, six 
sage leaves, and a liver, all chopped small ; 
put them into a mortar, with the crumb of a 
roll, four ounces of butter, half a tea-spoon- 
ful of Cayenne pepper, and half a pint of 
red wine ; beat it to a paste, put it in the 
pig’s belly, and sew it up ; lay your pig 
down at a good distance before a brisk fire, 
singe it well, put some red wine into the 
dripping-pan, and baste it well all the time 
of roasting : when half done, put under the 
pig two rolls ; and should the wine be too 
much reduced, add more : when your pig 
is nearly done, take the bread and sauce out 
of the dripping-pin, and put to the sauce an 
anchovy chopped small, a bundle of sweet 
herbs, and half a lemon ; boil it a few 
minutes; take up your pig, strain your 
sauce, and pour it on boiling hot : garnish 
with barberries and slices of lemon, 



90 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



MADE DISHES OF FOWL 

AND OTHER 



POULTRY. 



A FOWL A LA DAUBE. 

Bone a large fowl without cutting the 
skin, and singe it ; put in it a small piece 
of the prime of Westphalia ham (about the 
size of the breast of the fowl,) then fill it 
with a good force-meat, and braise it in a 
white braise ; when done, take it up and 
dry it; then glaze it, and put mushrooms 
on the dish, and the fowl at the top : gar- 
nish either with croutons, or paste baked 
for that purpose. 



RAGOUT MELLE. 

Cocks’ combs, fat livers, lamb sweet- 
breads, poulets’ eggs, let all be blanched 



ROYAL COOK. 



91 



off : put the combs into a stewpan to boil 
for a quarter of an hour, with about half a 
pint of stock ; let it do down to a glaze ; 
then put the other part of the ragout, with 
a sufficient quantity of sauce tourney. 



TWO DUCKS A LA DAUBE. 

Bone two ducks, and fill them with 
force-meat ; put them into a stewpan, with 
a little stock to set them ; put them on a 
slow stove for about ten minutes ; then 
add about a pint of good stock, the bones 
and giblets, half a pint of sherry, six or 
eight onions, a faggot, and a few blades of 
mace ; cover the ducks with sheets of 
bacon, and put them on a slow stove ; they 
w ill take about two hours ; take them out 
of the braise ; dry and glaze them ; strain 
the braise, skim the fat off, and reduce it 
to a glaze ; put coulis sufficient for the 
quantity of sauce that is wanting ; put 
about tw r o dozen of olives that have been 
pared and scalded ; put sauce on the dish, 
and the ducks on the sauce. 



92 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



N. 13. The olives should be pared as 
near the stone as possible, and without 
breaking 1 : when boiled they will come to 
their shape. 



BOILED CHICKENS AND TARRAGON 
SAUCE. 

Tarragon sauce is made as follows : — 
pick the tarragon from the sauce, leaf by leaf; 
put it on to blanch in a little cold water ;• 
when it boils, strain it off, put it into a 
small stewpan, with a little clear and pale 
coloured stock, and boil it down to a glaze ; 
add beshemell and a few drops of tarrogon 
vinegar ; boil the chickens about twenty 
minutes, put them in a dish, and pour the 
sauce over them. 



CHICKENS AND CELERY SAUCE. 

Boil the chickens about twenty mi- 
nutes, and make the celery sauce as fol- 
lows : cut the celery, after being properly 



ROYAL COOK. 



93 



trimmed, into small pieces ; boil it in clear 
stock for a quarter of an hour ; reduce the 
stock to a glaze, and add beshemell to the 
celery ; take the chickens up, and dry 
them in a cloth ; put them on the dish, 
and the sauce over them. 



A CURRIE OF RABBITS. 

Cut two rabbits up, the same as for a 
fricassee; fry them in a little clarified but- 
ter until they are of a light brown colour ; 
put them into a stewpan, with a little 
stock ; let them do very gently for about 
a quarter of an hour, then put a proper 
quantity of sauce tourney, and a small 
table spoonful of currie powder ; raise a 
rim of rice round a dish, and put the 
rabbits in the middle. 



A CURRIE ANOTHER WAY. 

Cut up two chickens or rabbits, the 
same as for a fricassee ; fry them in a little 
butter until they are of a light brown 



94 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



colour ; put them into a stewpan, with a 
little stock ; then chop three or four large 
onions very fine, and put them to the 
rabbits or chickens ; the onions should be 
fried in butter ; let them do very gently 
for about half an hour, then put a spoonful 
of currie powder, and a little Cayenne 
pepper ; boil some India rice, put it on a 
sieve, and dry it crisp before the fire ; then 
put the currie on a dish, and the rice on 
another dish. 



A FRICASEE OF CHICKENS. 

Cut up two chickens very neat ; take 
the thigh bones from the legs, and put the 
chickens into a stewpan, with cold water, 
and put them on the fire to blanch ; when 
they come to a boil, take them off the fire 
and put them into cold water ; put the 
trimmings into a stewpan, with a little 
lean ham, two onions, (a few cloves stuck 
in the onions,) a faggot, and a few blades 
of mace ; put them on the fire to boil for 
an hour, with about half a pint of water ; 
then strain it off, and put it to the chickens, 
7 



ROYAL COOK. 



95 



with about two ounces of butter; let it 
simmer over the stove for about half an 
hour ; put a bit of butter into a stewpan ; 
when melted, put a little dour and stock 
from the chickens, and add as much cream 
as will make it of a good white : it is a 
custom with some to thicken it with a 
liaison ; a liaison of three eggs will do ; 
put a few drops of garlic vinegar, half a 
lemon squeezed, and a little sugar. 



FAT LIVERS IN CASES. 

Scald the livers for a few minutes, to 
take away any bitterness that might re- 
main from the gall ; lay them on a cloth 
to dry ; then butter a tart-dish, put in the 
livers, and sprinkle them with pepper and 
salt ; put them in the oven for ten mi- 
nutes ; have a proper case the size of the 
dish, put the liver and liquor in the case, 
and put the dish, with the case on it, in the 
oven for a few minutes. 

N. B. If they are too much done, they 
become hard. 



96 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A CIVET OF HARE. 

Cut up a hare (that has not been roasted 
too dry) as neat as you can, by leaving as 
little bone as possible ; put the trimmings 
into a stewpan, with four large onions, a 
faggot of thyme and parsley, a few blades 
of mace, a pint of good stock, and a pint 
of port wine ; put them on a slow stove ; 
let it boil very gently for two hours, and 
strain it off ; put a bit of butter into a 
stewpan to melt, and add a little flour ; 
stir it about, to mix it, and then put the 
liquor that was strained from the trim- 
mings of the hare ; let it boil for a few 
minutes, and strain it through a tammy ; 
boil two dozen of button onions in stock, 
and put them to the civet ; dish the hare 
first, put the sauce over it, and onions at 
the top. 



TWO DUCKS BRAISED WITH TURNIPS. 

Bone them and fill them with force- 
meat ; put the bones, and any other poul- 
try trimmings, into a stewpan ; lay the 



ItOYAT. COOK 



97 



ducks on the bones, &c. ; put a few onions, 
a faggot, a few blades of mace, a pint of 
stock, and a little sherry wine ; cover the 
ducks with sheets of bacon and paper ; 
cover them down close, and put them on 3. 
slow stove for two hours : when they are 
done, take them up, strain the braise, skim 
the fat from it, and reduce it to a glaze ; 
scoop as many turnips as are requisite, and 
fry them in clarified butter; put a little 
coulis to the glaze of the ducks, and the 
turnips in the coulis : give them a boil : 
put the turnips on the dish first, then the 
ducks, first glazing them. 



A FRICANDEAU OF FOWL AND ENDIVE. 

Prepare a fowl as in page 90 ; lard 
it, and lay the bottom of the stewpan with 
sheets of bacon ; then lay the bones of the 
fowl, and any other trimmings, and the 
fowl upon them ; put in about a pint of 
second stock, a few bay leaves, onions, and 
a faggot ; cover the fowl with sheets of 
bacon, and then with white paper ; set it 

F 



98 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



on a stove, and let it do very gently ; the 
slower these kind of things do the better ; 
put a little fire on the top of the stewpan ; 
it should simmer for about an hour and a 
half ; the liquor should not come near the 
bacon ; when done, take it up, and put it 
in the oven for a few minutes, to raise the 
larding, before it is glazed ; put the endive 
on the dish first, and the fowl on it : gar- 
nish with croutons and carrot roses, or 
what you think proper. 

N. B. All lardings should be put in an 
oven for a few minutes before they are 
glazed. 



A SALMIE OF WILD DUCKS. 

Cut up two wild ducks that have been 
dressed and left from the day before ; put 
the legs, wings, and breasts, cut in slices, 
into a stewpan, and set them by until 
wanted ; put the trimmings into another 
stewpan, with a few shalots, a pint of good 
stock, and half a pint of red wine ; set it 
on a stove, and let it boil for half an hour ; 
then strain is off ; put a bit of butter into 



ROYAL COOK. 



99 



a stewpan ; when melted, put a little flour* 
and the liquor that has been strained from 
the bones ; give it a boil, and strain it 
through a tammy sieve ; put it into a stew- 
pan, give it a boil, squeeze a Seville orange 
in it, and add a little Cayenne pepper; 
then pour it over the duck, and put it by 
the side of the stove; do not let it boil, 
else it will be hard ; the sauce should not 
be quite so thick as sauces are in general. 



A BLANQUET OF POULARDE, WITH 
MUSHROOMS. 

CtJT the breast of one or two fowls 
(that have been roasted or boiled) into 
collops ; put all the other parts into a stew- 
pan, with some lean ham, a few shalots, a 
faggot, some trimmings of mushrooms, and 
about a pint of pale coloured stock ; let it 
boil very slowly for half an hour, then 
strain it off ; put a bit of butter into a 
stewpan, about half a pottle of mushrooms 
cut into thin slices, a table-spoonful of 
stock, and the juice of half a lemon (to 
keep the mushrooms white) ; let them do 

F 2 



100 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



gently for about ten minutes : put in a 
little flour, and shake it about the stewpan ; 
(do not stir it with a spoon, for fear of 
breaking the mushrooms ;) then add the 
stock that the bones of the fowls were 
boiled in, with the addition of a little 
cream ; let it boil about three minutes, 
then put it to the fowl, add a few drops 
of garlic vinegar, and a little pounded 
sugar ; garnish with croutons or with paste. 



A SOUTIES OF PHEASANTS AND 
TRUFFLES. 

Cut the breast of two pheasants into 
thin collops : flat them, and lay them on a 
souties-pan that has been buttered ; put in 
a few chopped truffles (if to be had), and a 
few spoon fids of sherry ; set them on the 
stove for a few minutes. At dishing them, 
all souties should be left until the last 
minute. The sauce is made as follows : — 
put about, a quarter of a pound of lean 
ham, cut fine, into a stewpan, with the 
bones of the pheasants ; a few shalots, a 



110YAL COOK. 



101 



little parsley, a. blade or two of mace, and 
a pint of stock ; set the stewpan on the 
stove to boil very slowly for an hour, then 
strain it off; put a bit of butter into a 
stewpan ; when melted, put flour to thicken- 
it ; stir it a few minutes over the fire, 
and then put in the liquor from the phea- 
sants’ bones ; let it boil a few minutes, 
and strain it through a tammy ; put a 
few sliced truffles in it, a little lemon- 
juice, and a dust of sugar ; put the souties 
on the dish, and the sauce over it : garnish 
with paste. 



TWO WOODCOCKS A LA TARTAR. 

Cut up two woodcocks that have been 
roasted ; put the wings, breast, and legs, 
into a stewpan ; the back and inside into 
another, with six shalots, half a pint of red 
wine, half a pint of stock, and a couple of 
bay leaves ; (if there are any odd bits of 
snipe, put them in ;) set the stewpan on 
the fire to boil very slow for half an hour, 
and then strain it off ; put a small bit of 
butter into a stewpan ; when melted, put a 



J02 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



little flour, (the sauce should be rather thin- 
ner than coulis,) and the liquor the bones 
of the woodcocks were boiled in ; let it 
boil for a few minutes, keep stirring it all 
the while, then take it from the fire and 
squeeze a Seville orange in ; put a little 
Cayenne pepper, and salt, if wanted ; then 
put the sauce to the woodcock, and put it 
on the side of a stove for a few minutes ; 
be careful that ft does not boil : garnish 
with paste and croutons. 



SALMIE OF WOODCOCKS. 

Cut up the woodcocks ; put the legs, 
wings, and breast, into a stewpan ; put 
the trimmings into another stewpan, with 
a little stock, a few shalots, and about a 
gill of port wine ; set the stewpan on the 
fire to boil slowly for half an hour, then 
strain it through a tammy sieve into the 
stewpan that has the woodcocks in it ; do 
not put it on the fire ; make the dish quite 
hot before you put the salmie on ; squeeze 
an orange in before you put it on the dish. 



ItOYAL COOK. 



103 



PIGEONS A LA CRAPAUDINE, AND 
PIQUANT SAUCE. 

Split the pigeons at the belly, and turn 
the breast over ; put four ounces of butter 
into a stewpan with chopped shalots, pars- 
ley, thyme, mushrooms, pepper, and salt ; 
set the stewpan on the fire to melt the 
butter ; put the pigeons on the dish, but 
not too near each other ; pour the butter 
over the pigeons, and when the butter 
begins to get cold, roll the pigeons in bread 
crumbs, and put them in a souties-pan that 
has been buttered with clarified butter ; 
do not turn them till the under- side is 
brown; when of a nice brown, lay them 
on a cloth to soak the butter from them : 
lay them round a dish, and the sauce in 
the middle. 

N. B. Six pigeons will make a dish ; 
the breast-bone should be taken out, and the 
leg and thigh boned ; the pinions cut off, 
the wing bone taken out, and the pigeons 
flatted with a flatter ; they may be broiled 
on the gridiron over a clear stove. 



104 



THE IMPERIAL AXI) 



COMPOTE OF PIGEONS WITH TRUFFLES. 

Draw the legs of four pigeons in the 
same manner as chickens for boiling, singe 
them, and fill them with force-meat ; put 
a small raw truffle in each pigeon ; put 
the necks and gizzards into a stewpan, and 
any other giblets that are at hand, about 
a quarter of a pound of lean ham, a few 
onions, a few blades of mace, a little pars- 
ley, two or three bay leaves, half a pint of 
sherry, and a pint of stock ; wrap the 
pigeons in sheets of bacon, put them in the 
stewpan, and set the stewpan over a slow 
fire to do very gently for an hour ; then 
strain the liquor ; skim the fat very clean 
from it, and put a little butter into a stew- 
pan to melt ; when melted, put as much 
flour as will make it of a proper thickness ; 
stir it for a few minutes over the fire before 
the liquor is put in ; then put the liquor in *, 
keep stirring it all the while ; let it boil for 
a few minutes ; slice a few truffles, and put 
them in the sauce ; take the pigeons up, lay 
them on a cloth to dry ; then put them on 
the dish, with the truffles and sauce over 



ROYAL COOK. 



105 



them ; a few fat livers and force-meat balls 
may be added. 

N. B. Squeeze half a lemon ; season 
with pepper and salt, &c. 



FOWL A LA DAUBE, ORNAMENTED AND 
GARNISHED WITH ASPIC. 

Bone a fowl, and fill it with farce ; lay 
the bottom of a stewpan with fat ham, or 
bacon, and half a pint af stock ; put the 
fowl in, and cover it with bacon and paper ; 
let it do very gently for two hours ; then 
set it to cool in the liquor and fat ; when 
cold, ornament it with different coloured 
fat, agreeably to your own taste ; put chop- 
ped aspic round the edge of the dish, and 
on the top part of the fowl. The aspic is 
made as follows : — lay the bottom of the 
soup-pot with lean ham, cut up knuckle of 
veal, two old fowls, the bones and giblets 
of the fowl that was daubed, and any other 
trimmings that are at hand ; the shanks 
that are cut from shoulders or legs of 
mutton which are going to be dressed are 

F 5 



106 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



very useful articles ; put in a dozen of 
onions, a small quantity of parsley, a little 
mace, and two or three heads of celery ; 
put four quarts of second stock, and set it 
on a stove to boil ; when it comes to a boil, 
take the pot off, and put it to the side to 
boil very slow for four or five hours ; it 
is not requisite to skim it, as it does not 
matter about its being clear ; when it has 
boiled a sufficient time, strain it off, and 
let it stand until next morning ; then take 
the fat very clean from the stock, put a 
pint of it into a stewpan, half a pound of 
lean ham cut very small, about twelve sha- 
lots, one small clove of garlic, a few tarra- 
gon leaves, and three or four bay leaves ; set 
the stewpan to boil for about half an hour; 
then put all the stock into it, and strain 
what the shalots, &c. were boiled in, and 
put it to the other ; add a little tarragon 
vinegar, and set it on a stove to melt ; 
when melted, break in twelve eggs and 
shells ; whisk all up together ; set it on a 
brisk stove ; keep whisking it until it boils ; 
let it boil for a few minutes ; then run it 
through a jelly bag, and clear it as you 
would calves’ feet jelly. 



ROYAL COOK. 



107 



N. B. If the stock is not strong’ enough, 
add a little isinglas : twelve eggs will clear 
two quarts of aspic. 



CAPILOTED FOWL. 

This is made from the remainder of 
roasted fowls which have been left ; cut 
the fowls up in neat pieces, the same as for 
a fricassee ; put the trimmings into a stew- 
pan, with a few shalots, a faggot, a blade or 
two of mace, about a quarter of a pound of 
lean ham, and a pint of stock ; let it boil 
slowly for half an hour ; strain it off, and 
put a bit of butter into a stewpan ; when 
melted, put as much flour as will dry up 
the butter, and stir it over the fire ; then 
put the liquor which the bones of the fowls 
were boiled in ; set the stewpan on the fire 
to boil for a few minutes, strain it through 
a tammy sieve, and put it to the fowls ; 
squeeze a little lemon-juice, put a little 
sugar, pepper, and salt ; lay the fowl neatly 
on the dish, and garnish with croutons. 

N. B. The sauce should not boil after 
the fat is put to it. 



103 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



FILLETS OF HARE LARDED, AND A 
PUREE OF HARE UNDER THEM. 

The fillets of hare are cut the same as 
fillets of rabbits ; the remaining part of the 
hare put into a stew pan, with a few shalots, 
about a quarter of a pound of lean ham, a 
faggot, a few blades of mace, half a pint of 
port wine, and hall' a pint of good stock ; 
put the stewpan on a stove to boil very 
slowly for two hours, then strain the liquor 
from the hare, and pick all the meat off the 
bones ; put the meat to the liquor and the 
lean ham ; put it into a tammy, rub it 
through, and put it into a stewpan to keep 
hot ; put the puree on the dish, and the 
fillets on the puree. 



PIGEONS BRAISED, AND ASPARAGUS 
PEAS. 

They should be tame pigeons, the legs 
drawn in, and as much skin as possible left 
on the neck ; they should be put on to 
blanch in cold water ; when they come to 



ROYAL COOK. 



109 



a boil, take them up, and wash them in 
several waters ; put sliced lemon over the 
breast, and sheets of bacon over that ; tie 
it on with fine twine ; put them in a white 
braise ; about twenty minutes will do them ; 
(for the asparagus peas, see page 77) ; strain 
the braise that the pigeons were done in, 
skim the fat very clean from it, and put the 
bottom on the fire to boil very fast ; when 
reduced to a glaze, put it to the asparagus 
peas ; dish the pigeons first, and put the 
sauce over them : garnish with paste. 



QUENELS OF FOWL. 

Scrape the white meat off one large 
fowl, or two small ones ; scrape an equal 
quantity of fat ham, and half as much lean ; 
put it into a mortar, with chopped parsley, 
shalot, and mushrooms ; pound all toge- 
ther ; then put in two yolks of eggs, beat 
the w hites upon a plate with a knife, mix 
the yolks with the fowl, &c. before the 
whites are put in ; then put in the whites, 
and mix all well ; add a little pepper and 
salt ; take it out of the mortar, and put 



110 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



about a pint of good stock on a quick stove ; 
when it boils, put some of the quenel into a 
large spoon ; have a tea-spoon, and put as 
much as it will hold into the stock until it 
is all in ; take it up with a slice the same 
as you would a poached egg ; the quenel 
should be about the size of the yolk of an 
egg ; pour white Italian sauce over them. 



FOUR PIGEONS LARDED, AND A RAGOUT 
OF COCKS’ COMBS. 

Draw in the legs of four large pigeons, 
fill them with farce, and then lard them ; 
lay sheets of bacon in the bottom of a stew- 
pan ; put a pint of stock in it, four onions, 
a little parsley, a few bay leaves, and a 
blade or two of mace ; put the pigeons in, 
cover them over with sheets of bacon, and 
set them on a stove to simmer for half an 
hour; put some lighted charcoal on the 
cover of the stewpan ; when the pigeons 
are done, finish them the same as other 
lardings ; put the ragout on a dish, and the 
pigeons on it : garnish with paste. 



ItOYAL COOK, 



111 



N. B. Strain the braise, skim the fat 
from it, and put the bottom to the ragout. 



GROUSE BRAISED, AND CABBAGE. 

Draw the legs of the grouse in, the 
same as chickens for boiling ; lay the bot- 
tom of the stewpan with fat bacon, put in 
the grouse and twelve shalots, a blade or 
two of mace, two or three bay leaves, and a 
little parsley ; blanch off three white cab- 
bages, cut them in quarters, and let them 
boil until three parts done, then put them 
in cold water to cool ; when cold, squeeze 
them very dry with your hand, then press 
them with a cloth, tie them up with twine, 
and put them in the stewpan, with the 
grouse, to imbibe the flavour of them ; the 
grouse will take one hour to braise over a 
very slow stove ; when they are done, 
strain off the liquor, and skim the fat from 
them ; put a bit of butter into a stewpan, 
and set it on the fire to melt ; when 
melted, put a little flour, and stir it over 
the fire a few minutes ; then put in the 



112 THE IMPERIAL AND 



liquor the grouse were braised in; let it 
boil for a few minutes ; keep stirring it 
while it is on the fire, to hinder it from 
sticking to the bottom ; if there should not 
be sauce enough, add a little coulis ; put 
the grouse on the dishes, three on each 
dish, and four bundles of cabbage on each 
dish; (the grouse and cabbage should be 
laid on a clean cloth, to soak the lat from 
them ;) put the sauce over the grouse and 
cabbage. 



DAUBED FOWLS. 

Bone two large fowls : put a piece of 
the prime part of ham that has been 
braised in the fowls, and fill them with 
farce ; if truffles are to be had, put six 
or eight in each fowl that has not been 
braised — peel them ; put a few sheets of 
bacon at the bottom of a stewpan, and the 
bones of the fowls, or any other giblets or 
trimmings that you may have in hand ; 
put a quart of stock, a few onions, a fag- 
got, three bay leaves, and two or three 
blades of mace ; then put in the fowls, and 



ItOYAL COOK. 



113 



cover them with bacon and paper ; set 
them on a slow stove to do very gently for 
two hours, then strain the liquor from the 
fowls, and skim the fat very clean from the 
liquor ; put about an ounce of butter into 
a stewpan, and set it on the fire to melt ; 
when melted, put as much flour as will dry 
it up, set it on the fire, and keep stirring 
it for a minute or two ; then put the liquor 
that the fowls were braised in, and about 
half a pint of good cream that has boiled ; 
set the stewpan on the fire, and keep stir- 
ring it until it boils ; let it boil for a few 
minutes, then strain it through a tammy ; 
the sauce should be about the thickness of 
beshemell ; take the fowls up, and put 
them on a cloth to soak the fat ; then put 
them on the dishes ; put the sauce over 
the fowls, but not all at once ; it should be 
put over at three different times ; the last 
time should be just before they are taken 
out of the kitchen : garnish with paste. 

N. B. If not cut, they will do for pies 
or ornamenting. 



114 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A JUGGED HARE. 

Bone a hare, and put the bones into 
a soup-pot, with lean ham, six or eight 
large onions, a small quantity of parsley, a 
little mace, one pint of stock, and a pint of 
port wine ; put the pot on the fire to boil 
for two hours,, and strain it off; put the 
hare on the fire to blanch, with a little cold 
water ; when it comes to a boil, take and 
wash it in several waters, then cut the legs 
into two pieces, the long way ; cut the 
shoulder part from the back ; then split 
the hack dow n, and cut each half into three 
pieces ; then put it into a small soup-pot, 
and the liquor which the bones were stewed 
in ; cut one pound of ham, fat and lean, 
into neat pieces, and put them to the hare ; 
cover the meat over with paper, and also 
the lid of the pot ; put the pot into a stew- 
pan of water, and let the water come above 
three parts up the pot ; put it on to boil ; 
it should boil for three hours, or until the 
hare is quite tender; (when the water 
boils away that is in the stewpan put more 
boiling water;) when done, put it on the 



ROYAL COOK. 



115 



dish, the hare in the middle, and the ham 
round the sides ; skim the liquor very clean 
from the fat, and put it to the hare. There 
may be a few button onions sent up on the 
hare. It should be sent up in a deep dish. 

N. B. It will make either a middle or a 
flank dish, in large dinners. 



PARTRIDGES AND PHEASANTS, 

PRESERVED FOR ENTRES AND PIES, FOR DINNERS AND 
LARGE ENTERTAINMENTS, WHEN GAME 

• IS OUT OF SEASON. 

Those for pies should be boned and 
filled with farce, and two raw truffles put 
in them ; the bones of the partridges or 
pheasants to be put in a stewpan, with two 
old fowls, a knuckle of veal, about three 
pounds of lean ham cut in slices, half a 
pound of shalots, a faggot of sweet herbs, 
a few blades of mace, a pint of good stock, 
and a pint of sherry ; then cover the bones, 
&c. with sheets of bacon, put the partridges 
on the bacon, and cover them over with 
bacon and a sheet of paper cut to the size 



116 



THE IMPERIAL A1S V T) 



of the stewpan, by way of keeping in all 
the steam ; put the stewpan over a slow 
stove to simmer very gently until the par- 
tridges are tender, but not so as to break ; 
be careful that the liquid does not come to 
the partridges, as they should be done by 
the steam : when they are done, take them 
out, and put them in bacon dishes, or what 
you intend to put them by in ; then fill the 
stewpan up with the best stock, and let it 
boil very gently for three or four hours ; 
then strain it off, skim the fat from it, and 
boil it down to a glaze, (but not quite so 
low as for glazing ;) pour the glaze while 
hot over the partridges, then clarify the 
fat that you skimmed off the liquid, and 
the fat from any other braise that may be 
at hand ; pour it over the partridges while 
hot; the fat should be at least one inch 
deep, and the birds entirely covered. 

Pheasants are done in the same manner. 
Those which are intended to be served up 
hot, for the first course, either with cab- 
bage or truffles, should not be boned, but 
filled with farce, and truffles put in them ; 
the legs should be drawn in the same as 



"ROYAI-. COOK. 



117 



chickens for boiling. Those which are 
intended for a cold pie should be done as 
follows : — raise a pie according to the num- 
ber of the birds you intend to put in ; lay 
a thick layer of good farce at the bottom ; 
then take the fat off the partridges, and 
put them in the pie, (but not the glaze ;) 
cover them with farce and thin sheets of 
bacon, or the fat of a cutting ham, which is 
what is generally used for all things that 
require to be covered with fat ; as, in the 
first place, it generally has a finer flavour 
than bacon ; and, in the next, the fat of 
ham cannot be used in any other way ; 
therefore it would be wasted, if not so 
used : it answers two good purposes ; which 
are, by giving a better flavour, and being 
economical : cover the pie in, ornament it, 
put it into a slow oven, and let it stay until 
it has baked about half an hour; then 
take it out, make the glaze hot that the 
partridges are taken from, and put a little 
jrood stock to it, to weaken it ; and, when 

o 

hot, put into the pie about one pound of 
truffles (when they can be had) with six 
partridges, as they greatly improve the 
1 



118 



THE IMPEltlAL AND 



flavour of the pie. The same rule should 
be followed in making a pheasant pie; 
either put aspic over it, or send some in a 
butter-boat, which is the best way, if the 
pie is for a side-table, and to be used at 
dinner time. For ball suppers, put aspic 
over the birds. 

The partridges or pheasants that are 
intended for entres, should be warmed by 
the side of a slow stove ; the sauce to be 
made from part of the glaze that belongs 
to the birds, and good stock ; or by putting 
some of the glaze into coulis ; braise the 
cabbage in a brown braise, or with a ham, 
or any tiling else of that kind. 



POTTED HARE. 

Bone a hare and cut it up in small 
pieces ; cut as much fat and lean ham as 
there is hare ; put it into a stewpan, with 
a bit of butter, a little stock, pepper, salt, 
and a little fine spice; put it on a slow- 
stove, to draw down, for an hour; then 
put a pint of port wine, and let it boil very 
6 



ROYAL COOK. 



119 



slow till all the liquor is reduced to a glaze ; 
put it into a mortar, and pound it till very 
fine ; taste it, that you may know if it 
wants any more seasoning ; put it into 
potting pots, pour clarified butter over it, 
and put it into a slow oven for half an 
hour ; then take it out, put it to cool, and 
fill it up with clarified butter ; either send it 
up in the pot, or turn it out, and glaze it 
with aspic. 



CHICKEN PANADO. 

Boil a chicken in a little very good and 
clear stock until quite tender ; when done, 
take it up, and take the skin off the breast 
and legs ; mince the breast and legs very 
fine, then pound it in a mortar; put the 
bones in the liquor the chickens were 
boiled in ; put them on the stove to boil 
while the chicken is pounding ; when 
pounded very fine, put it in a bason, and a 
little of the stock which the chicken was 
boiled in ; mix it up with a spoon ; when 
well mixed, rub it through a tammy sieve ; 
while that is doing, reduce the remainder 



120 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



of the liquid which the chicken w r as boiled 
in nearly to a glaze ; w hen the chicken is 
rubbed through the sieve, put it into a 
stewpan that has the liquid belonging to 
it ; put it by the side of a stove to make 
hot, but be careful that it does not boil ; 
season it w ith a little salt, so as to make 
it palatable. 



MUTTON PANADO. 

Mince either the fillet of the inside of 
a chine, of mutton when roasted, or .the 
lean part of a neck or loin ; then pound it 
in a mortar, mix it up with a spoon, and 
rub it through a sieve ; when done, put it 
in a stewpan to warm very gently ; be 
careful that it does not boil ; season it w ith 
a very little salt. 

N. B. Beef or veal panado should be 
done the same way ; it is not intended as 
a dish for the table, but for a person in ill 
health. 



ROYAL COOK. 



121 



SNIPE, OR WOODCOCKS, IN SURTOUT. 

Take some force-meat (made of veal,) 
as much beef suet, chopped and beat in a 
mortar, with an equal quantity of crumbs 
of bread ; mix a little beaten mace, pepper 
and salt, some parsley, a few sweet herbs, 
and the yolk of an egg ; lay some of this 
meat round a dish, and put the snipes in, 
being first drawn and half roasted : take 
care of the trail, chop it, and scatter it all 
over the dish : take some good gravy, ac- 
cording to the bigness of your surtout, 
some truffles and morels, a few mushrooms, 
a sweetbread cut into pieces, and the bot- 
toms of artichokes cut small : let all stew 
together, shake them, and take the yolks 
of two or three eggs, beat them up with a 
spoonful or two of white wine, and stir all 
together one way : when it is thick, take it 
off, let it cool, and pour it into the surtout : 
put in the yolks of a few hard eggs here 
and there; season it with beaten mace, 
pepper, and salt, to your taste ; cover it 
with the force-meat all over, then rub in 
the yolks of eggs, to colour it, and send it 

G 



122 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



to the oven : half an hour will do it suffi- 
ciently, which will be known by their ap- 
pearing of a nice brown colour : when done, 
serve them up either with shrimp sauce or 
plain melted butter : garnish with red cab- 
bage. 



DUCKS A LA FRANCOISE. 

Put two dozen of roasted chesnuts, 
peeled, into a pint of stock, with a few 
leaves of thyme, two small onions, a little 
whole pepper, and a bit of ginger ; take a 
fine tame duck, lard it, and half roast it, 
then put it into the gravy ; let it stew ten 
minutes, and add a quarter of a pint of red 
wine ; when the duck is done, take it out, 
boil up the gravy to a proper thickness, 
skim it very clean from the fat, lay the 
duck in the dish, and pour the sauce over 
it : garnish with lemon. 



CHICKENS IN SAVORY JELLY. 

Roast two chickens, and boil some 
calves’ feet to a strong jelly ; then take out 



llOYAI, COOK. 



123 



the feet, and skim off the fat ; beat up the 
whites of three eggs, and mix them with 
half a pint of white wine vinegar, the juice 
of three lemons, a blade or two of mace, a 
few pepper-corns, and a little salt ; put 
them to your jelly ; when it has boiled five 
or six minutes, strain it through a jelly bag 
several times till it is very clear ; then put 
a little in the bottom of a bowl large 
enough to hold your chickens ; when they 
are cold and the jelly set, lay them in, with 
their breasts down ; then fill your bowl 
quite full with the rest of your jelly, which 
you must take care to keep from setting, 
so that when you pour it into your bowl it 
will not break ; let it stand all night, and 
the next day put your bason into warm 
water, pretty near the top ; as soon as you 
find it loose in the bason, lay your dish 
over it, and turn it out whole. 



FLORENDINE HARE. 



Let your hare be a full grown one, and 
let it hang up four or five days before you 

G 2 



124 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



case it; let the ears remain on, but take 
out all the bones, except those of the head, 
which must be left entire ; lay your hare 
on the table, and put into it the following 
force-meat : — take the crumb of a penny 
loaf, the liver shred fine, half a pound of 
fat bacon, scraped, a glass of red wine, an 
anchovy, tw r o eggs, a little winter savory, 
some sweet marjoram, and a little pepper, 
salt, and nutmeg : having put this into the 
belly, roll it up to the head, and fasten it 
with packthread, as you would a collar of 
veal ; wrap it in a cloth, and boil it an hour 
and a half in a saucepan, covered, with two 
quarts of w ater : as soon as the liquor is 
reduced to about a quart, put in a pint of 
red wine, a spoonful of lemon-pickle, one 
of catsup, and the same of browning ; then 
stir it till it is reduced to a pint, and 
thicken it with butter rolled in flour ; lay 
round your hare a few morels, and four slices 
of force-meat boiled in the caul of a leg of 
veal : when you dish it up, draw the jaw- 
bones, and stick them in the sockets of the 
eyes; let the ears lay back, on the roll, 
and stick a sprig of myrtle in the mouth ; 



ROYAL COOK. 



125 



strain your sauce over it, and garnish with 
barberries and parsley. 



CHICKENS CHIRINGR ATE. 

Flatten the breast-bones of your 
chickens with a rolling-pin, but be careful 
that you do not break the skin ; strew 
some flour ; then fry them, in butter, of a 
fine light brow n ; dry all the fat out of the 
pan, but leave the chickens in ; lay a pound 
of gravy beef, with the same quantity of 
veal cut in thin slices, over your chickens^ 
together with a little mace, two or three 
cloves, some W’hole pepper, an onion, a 
small faggot of sweet herbs, and a piece of 
carrot ; then pour in a quart of boiling 
water, cover it close, and let it stew a 
quarter of an hour ; then take out the 
chickens, and keep them hot ; let the gravy 
boil till it is rich and good ; then strain it 
off, and put it into your pan again, with 
half a pint of red wine and a fevv mush- 
rooms ; put in your chickens to warm, 



126 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



then take them up, lay them in your dish, 
and pour your sauce over them : garnish 
with lemon, and a few slices of cold boiled 
ham. 



A GOOSE MARINADE. 

Bone your goose, and stuff it with 
force-meat, made thus : — take ten or twelve 
sage leaves, two large onions, and two or 
three large sharp apples ; chop them very 
fine, mix with them the crumb of a penny 
loaf, four ounces of beef marrow, two 
glasses of red wine, half a nutmeg, grated, 
pepper, salt, a little lemon-peel, shred small, 
and the yolks of four eggs : when you have 
stuffed your goose with this, sew it up, fry 
it of a light brown, and then put it into a 
deep stewpan, with two quarts of good 
stock ; cover it close, and let it stew two 
hours ; then take it out, put it into a dish, 
and keep it warm : skim the fat clean off 
from the sauce, and put into it a large 
spoonful of lemon-pickle, one of browning, 
one of red wine, an anchovy shred fine, a 
little beaten mace, with pepper aud^salt to 



ROYAL COOK. 



127 



your taste ; thicken it with flour and but- 
ter ; dish up your g*oose, strain the sauce 
over it, and send it to table. 



MARINADED FOWL. 

Raise the skin from the breast-bone of 
a fowl with your finger ; take a veal sweet- 
bread, oysters, mushrooms, an anchovy, 
pepper, nutmeg, and lemon-peel ; chop 
them small, and mix them with the yolk 
of an egg ; stuff this between the skin and 
the flesh, but do not break the skin ; put 
oysters in the body of the fowl, paper the 
breast, and roast it ; make good gravy, and 
garnish with lemon. 



MACEDONIAN DUCKS. 

Take four artichoke bottoms, cut them 
into pieces, and put them into boiling 
water, with about a pint of garden beans, 
first scalded and brushed : boil all together 
till almost done, and then drain them : put 



128 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



the whole into a stewpan, with a good 
piece of butter, chopped mushrooms, a little 
winter savory, parsley, and shalots — all 
finely chopped ; add a little flour, two 
spoonfuls of veal gravy, and a glass of 
white wine ; simmer them slowly till the 
whole is well done, and the sauce reduced 
to a proper consistence ; last of all, add a 
little coulis, the squeeze of a lemon, and a 
little pepper and salt : serve this ragout 
under two ducks quartered ; and braise in 
a well-seasoned braise, with slices of veal 
and bacon. 



TO DRESS A WILD DUCK. 

Having half roasted your duck, lay it 
on a dish and carve it, but leave the joints 
hanging together ; throw a little pepper 
and salt, and squeeze the juice of a lemon, 
over it : turn it on the breast, and press it 
hard with a plate ; add to its own gravy 
two or three spoonfuls of good stock ; 
cover it close with another dish over a stove 
ten minutes, then send it to table hot in 
the dish it was done in : garnish with lemon. 



ROYAL COOK. 



129 



TO RAGOUT A GOOSE. 

Having beat the breast down with a 
cleaver, press it down with your hand, skin 
it, and dip it into scalding water ; take 
it out, and, as soon as it is cold, lard it with 
bacon, and season with pepper, salt, a little 
beaten mace, and flour it all over : take a 
pound of good beef suet, cut small, and put 
it into a deep stewpan ; as soon as it is 
melted put in your goose, and let it brown 
on both sides ; then put in a cpiart of best 
stock, an onion or two, a faggot of sweet 
herbs, some whole pepper, and a few cloves; 
cover it close, and let it stew slowly till it 
is tender : an hour will do it, if it be 
small ; an hour and a half, if large. In 
the meantime, boil some turnips almost 
enough, and some carrots and onions quite 
enough ; cut your turnips and carrots the 
same as for a haricot of mutton, and put 
them into a saucepan, with half a pint of 
good stock, a little pepper and salt, and a 
piece of butter rolled in flour ; stew them 
all together a quarter of an hour : take the 

G 5 



130 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



goose and drain it well, then lay it in the 
dish, and pour the ragout over it. 



TO STEW GIBLETS. 

Having, cut the neck into four pieces, 
and the pinions into two, slice the gizzard, 
clean it well, and stew them in two quarts 
of second stock, with a faggot of sweet 
herbs, an anchovy, a few pepper-corns, 
three or four cloves, a spoonful of catsup, 
and an onion : as soon as the giblets are 
tender, put in two spoonfuls of white wine, 
thicken with flour and butter, squeeze in 
half a lemon, and send them to table. 



# 

PIGEONS IN SAVORY JELLY. 

Having roasted your pigeons with the 
heads and feet on, put a sprig of myrtle in 
their bills ; make the same kind of jelly as 
directed for chickens ; and when it is set, 
lay in the pigeons with their breasts down- 
wards, fill up your mould with jelly, and 
turn it out. 



ROYAL COOK. 



131 



PIGEONS A LA DAUBE. 

Take four or five pig-eons, cut off their 
feet and pinions, and split them through 
the breast ; then take out the livers, and 
flat them with a cleaver : make a hot 
marinade of some scraped bacon, season it 
with mushrooms, or two green onions, 
pepper, salt, parsley, and a little nutmeg ; 
fry all together for a few minutes, and let 
the pigeons be heated through in it, and 
let them remain till you put them upon 
your gridiron : take a thin slice of ham for 
each pigeon, and put them, with the ham, 
always at top ; that is, when you turn 
your pigeons, turn your ham upon them : 
for your sauce, take a ladle of good stock, 
some sweet basil, a little parsley, a shalot 
minced very fine, and a few slices of mush- 
rooms ; boil all together a few minutes : 
dish the pigeons up with their breasts down- 
wards, let your ham continue upon them, 
and pour your sauce over them, with the 
juice of an orange or lemon. 



132 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



PIGEONS A LA ROYALE. 

Take any number of pigeons you please 
that are of an equal size, put a peeled 
truffle in each, and give them a fry in 
butter ; add chopped mushrooms, parsley, 
a slice of ham, and some pepper and salt ; 
put them into a stewpan to braise, with a 
few slices of veal, first scalded, and the 
first seasoning over the pigeons ; cover 
them with thin slices of bacon, and put a 
sheet of white paper over the whole ; stop 
the pan close, and let them simmer over a 
slow fire till they are quite tender ; take 
out the pigeons, and clean them from the 
fat ; strain the braise, and boil it a moment, 
in order to skim it very clean : when it is 
ready, squeeze in a lemon, and pour the 
sauce over the pigeons. 



PIGEONS A LA PUMPJON. 

Roll out savory force-meat, like paste, 
into a buttered dish, and put a lair of very 
thin slices of bacon, squab pigeons, sliced 
sweetbread, asparagus tops, mushrooms. 



ROYAL COOK. 



133 



cocks’ combs, a palate boiled tender and 
cut into pieces, and the yolks of four eggs 
boiled hard : make another force-meat, and 
lay it over the hole like a pie crust : bake 
it ; and, when done, turn it into a dish ; 
pour in some rich gravy, and serve it up 
hot. 



TURKEY A LA DAUBE. 

Carefully bone a turkey, and do not 
spoil its appearance ; stuff it with the fol- 
lowing force-meat : — chop oysters, and mix 
them with crumbs of bread, pepper, salt, 
slialots, parsley, and butter ; fill your tur- 
key with this, sew it up, tie it in a cloth, 
and boil it white, but not too much ; serve 
it up w r ith oyster sauce, or make a rich 
gravy of the bones, with a piece of veal, 
mutton, and bacon ; season with salt, pep- 
per, shalots, and a little mace ; strain it 
off ; and having before half boiled your 
turkey, stew it in this gravy half an hour ; 
skim the gravy well, dish up your turkey 
in it, after you have thickened it with a 
few mushrooms stewed white, stewed 

1 



134 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



palates, force-meat balls, sweetbreads, or 
fried oysters, and pieces of lemon ; dish it 
with the breast upwards ; you may add 
morels and truffles to the sauce. 



LARKS A LA FRANCOISE. 

Truss them with legs across, and put a 
sage leaf over the breast ; put them on 
a thin skewer ; and between every lark 
place a bit of thin lawn ; tie the skewer to 
a spit, and roast them before a brisk fire ; 
baste with butter, and strew over crumbs 
of bread ; mix it . witli flour ; fry some 
crumbs of a fine brown, butter, lay the 
larks round a dish, and the crumbs in the 
middle. 



SNIPES, WITH PURSLAIN LEAVES. 

Draw, and make a force-meat for the 
inside of your snipes, but preserve your 
ropes for the sauce ; spit them across upon 
a lark spit, cover with bacon and paper, 
and roast them gently. For sauce, take 
some purslain leaves or parsley, blanch 



ROYAL COOK 



135 



them well in water, put them in a ladleful 
of coulis and gravy, a bit of shalot, pepper, 
salt, nutmeg, and parsley ; stew them 
gently for half an hour ; have the ropes 
ready blanched, and put in ; dish up your 
snipes upon thin slices of bread, fried, 
squeeze the juice of an orange into your 
sauce, and serve them up. 



RABITS SURPRISED. 

Skewer and stuff two young rabbits as 
for roasting ; roast them, and take the 
meat from the bones, which must be left 
whole ; chop the meat fine with shred 
parsley, lemon-peel, an ounce of beef mar- 
^ row, a spoonful of cream, and a little salt ; 
beat the yolks of two eggs, boiled hard, 
with a small piece of butter, in a mortar ; 
mix all together, and stew it five minutes ; 
lay it on the rabbits when the meat is off, 
and put it down close and even, to make 
them appear whole ; then, with a salaman- 
der, brown them all over : pour a good 
gravy, made as thick as cream, into the 
7 



136 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



dish, and stick myrtle in their mouths ; 
serve them up with the livers boiled and 
frothed. 



RABBITS EN GALLENTINE. 

Bone and flatten two young rabbits ; 
put some force-meat upon them, slips of 
lean ham, breast of fowl, and omelets of 
eggs, white and yellow, the same as for 
garnishing ; roll tight, and sew them up 
neatly ; lard the top part with slips of fat 
bacon ; blanch and braise them : glaze the 
larding, put good coulis under them, and 
serve them hot. 



RABITS EN MATELOT. 

Prepare two rabbits as for a fricassee ; 
put them, with as many pieces of bacon as 
there are of rabbit, into a stewpan, with 
half a pint of stock, two dozen of small 
onions, and half a pottle of mushrooms; 
cover with paper, and set it on a stove to 
simmer for an hour ; then take the rabbit, 
&c. and lay it on the dish, skim off the fat, 



ROYAL COOK. 



137 



and reduce the liquor nearly to a glaze ; 
put coulis to it, give it a boil, take it from 
the fire, and squeeze half a lemon ; add 
Cayenne pepper and a little sugar ; pour it 
over the rabbit, and garnish with paste. 



FISH MADE DISHES. 



SAUMON A LA BRAZE. 

Slit a large eel open ; take out the 
bone and the meat quite clean from it; 
chop it fine, with two anchovies, some 
lemon-peel cut fine, a little pepper, and 
grated nutmeg, some parsley cut small, and 
the yolk of an egg boiled hard : mix them 
all together, and roll them up in a piece of 
butter ; then take a large piece of fine sal- 
mon, or a salmon-trout, and put this force- 
meat into the belly of the fish ; sew it up 
and lay it on an oval stewpan that will just 
hold it ; then put half a pound of fresh 
butter into a stewpan, and when it is 



138 



TIIE IMPERIAL AND 



melted, shake in a little flour ; stir it till it 
is a little brown, and then put to it a pint 
of fish broth and a pint of Madeira ; season 
it with pepper, salt, mace, and cloves, and 
put in an onion and a bunch of sweet 
herbs : stir it all together, and put it to 
the fish ; cover it very close, and let it 
stew : when the fish is almost done, put in 
some fresh and pickled mushrooms, truffles, 
or morels cut in pieces, and let them stew 
till the fish is quite done ; take lip the 
salmon carefully, lay it on a dish, and put 
the sauce over it. 



SALMON WITH SWEET HERBS. 

Mix a piece of butter with some chop- 
ped parsley, shalots, sweet herbs, mush- 
rooms, pepper, and salt : put some of this 
in the bottom of the dish you intend to 
send to table, then some thin slices of 
salmon upon it, and the remainder of the 
butter and herbs upon the salmon : strew 
it over with bread crumbs, then baste it 
with butter, and bake it in the oven : when 



ROYAL COOK. 



139 



it is enough, drain the fat from it, and 
serve it up with a clear relishing sauce. 



SOLES A LA FRANCOISE. 

Skin and clean a pair of soles, and put 
them into an earthen dish, with a quail; of 
water and half a pint of vinegar ; let them 
lie two hours, then take them out, and dry 
them with a cloth ; put them into a stew- 
pan, with a pint of white wine, a quarter 
of a pint of water, a little sweet marjoram, 
winter savory, and an onion stuck with 
four cloves ; put in the soles, sprinkle in a 
very little bay salt, cover them close, and 
let them simmer very gently till they are 
done ; then take them out, and lay them 
in a warm dish before the tire ; strain the 
liquor, put into it a piece of butter rolled 
in flour, and let it boil till of a proper 
thickness ; lay the soles in a dish, and pour 
the sauce over them : in the same manner 
you may dress a small turbot, or any flat 
fish. 



140 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



FILLETS OF SALMON, WITH CAPERS. 

Cut six thin slices of salmon, flat them 
gently, and season them with pepper and 
salt ; (first brush them over with egg ;) 
roll them up, and put them into a stewpan 
that will just hold them ; put about half a 
pint of stock, cover them with bacon, and 
set them on a stove for half an hour : when 
done, lap them round a dish ; put a little 
coulis into a stewpan with the liquor the 
salmon was done in, a few capers chopped, 
a little anchovy essence, a glass of Madeira, 
and squeeze half a lemon into it, with a 
little sugar. If for meagre, use a fish 
stock. 



FILLET OF SOLE A L’lTALIENNE. 

Fillet a pair of soles ; scrape two of 
the fillets, and as much fat bacon ; put it 
into the mortar, with a little parsley and 
shalots, ail chopped very fine ; rub it about 
the mortar a few minutes ; put in half the 
crumb of a French roll that has been 
soaked in cream ; mix them together ; then 



ROYAL COOK. 



141 



beat up the white of an egg, and put it in 
the mortar, with a little pepper and salt, 
and two anchovies, washed, boned, and 
chopped very fine ; take it all out of the 
mortar ; flat the fillets of soles, brush them 
over with egg, then spread the farce on, 
and roll them up ; put them into a tart 
pan, (first covering the bottom with bacon ;) 
add a few spoonfuls of stock ; cover the 
fillets with bacon ; put them in a slow 
oven for half an hour, then dish them, and 
pour white Italian sauce over them. If 
for meagre, leave the bacon out. 



SOUTIES OF SOLE, WITH SAUCE A 
LA REINE. 

Bone a pair of soles, and cut each fillet 
in three ; butter a souties-pan, and sprinkle 
it with pepper and salt, chopped parsley, 
and mushrooms ; lay the soles on, and 
sprinkle them over ; set them on a slow 
stove ; a very few minutes will do them ; 
dish them round the dish and pour the 
sauce over them j scrape the herbs from 



142 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



the pan, and put them to the sauce; 
squeeze a lemon, and add a few drops of 
shalot vinegar. 



SOUTIES OF FISH. 

Fillet two haddocks, and cut them in 
collops ; butter a souties-pan, sprinkle it 
with pepper and salt, flat the collops of 
fish, and put them on the souties-pan ; set 
them over a stove for about three minutes, 
turn them, and put them on a dish ; put 
the liquor that comes from the fish into the 
stewpan, and some beshemell, a few drops 
of the essence of anchovy, a few drops of 
garlic vinegar, a little lemon-juice, and a 
dust of sugar ; put the sauce over the 
souties, and garnish with paste or croutons. 



SEMELS OF TURTLES. 

Cut the lean flesh of the turtle into 
round pieces about the size and thickness 
of a crown-piece ; put about a quarter of a 
pound of fresh butter into a stewpan, with 



ROYAL COOK. 



143 



pepper and salt, chopped mushrooms, pars- 
ley, knotted and sweet marjoram, and a 
very little basil ; set the stewpan on a 
stove to melt the butter, then let it get 
three parts cold, and put some clarified 
butter in a souties-pan ; dip the turtle first 
in the butter and herbs, and then in bread 
crumbs ; put it on the souties-pan, and then 
on the stove, to finish : . dish them round 
the dish, and the sauce in the middle. 



A SOUTIES OF LIVER OF TURTLE. 

Butter a souties-pan, sprinkle it with 
fine herbs, chopped truffles, and put a glass 
of Madeira wine on it ; cut the liver in 
slices, and lay them on the souties-pan ; 
sprinkle them with pepper and salt, turn 
them, and the liver will do in a very short 
time ; put it round the dish ; put the kid- 
ney and hearts in the middle, and piquant 
sauce over them : scrape the herbs from 
the souties-pan into the sauce. 



144 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



MATELOT OF TENCH. 

Scale and clean the tench, and put 
them into a stewpan, with a pint of stock, 
a pint of port wine, two dozen of button 
onions, half a pottle of mushrooms, and a 
faggot, with a few blades of mace tied up 
in it ; set it on the stove to stew for half 
an hour ; then put about one ounce of 
butter into a stewpan, with chopped parsley, 
shalot, three or four anchovies, and a little 
stock; set the stewpan on the fire to boil very 
slowly for a few minutes ; add a little flour, 
and then the liquor from the tench ; put it 
on the fire to boil, and keep stirring it all 
the time ; then rub it through a tammy 
sieve, and put it to the tench, with about 
two dozen of oysters and liquor ; (the 
oysters should be blanched first ;) squeeze 
in half a lemon, and garnish with croutons. 



FILLETS OF WHITING. 

Put the fillets into boiling water for 
about five minutes ; then take them up, 
put them into a dish, and put white Ita- 



ROYAL COOK. ’ 



145 



lian sauce over them : garnish with paste 
or croutons. 



A DRESSED CRAB, HOT OR COLD. 

Pick a crab, and put the fish into a 
stewpan, with a bit of butter, a little an- 
chovy essence, mustard, oil, vinegar, a little 
elder vinegar, and a few bread crumbs : 
mix it well : if for hot, put it over the 
stove, and return it into the shell ; put 
bread crumbs over it, and a little clarified 
butter dropped on with a paste brush ; put 
it in the oven, and brown it with a sala- 
mander : if for cold, put no bread crumbs 
over it : garnish it with the small claws, 
made into a ring, when only pickled : put 
the fish that is on one side into the shell, 
and what is in the claws of the other ; 
garnish with pickled parsley round the 
shell, and the small claws round the dish. 



DRESSED LOBSTER, HOT OR COLD. 
Take the fish from the tails and claws 
as whole as possible; the tail should be 



146 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



split : lay it on a dish. If for cold, make 
the sauce as follows : — bruise the yolk of 
two boiled eggs with the back of a spoon ; 
put a few drops of water to them, as it will 
help to soften the eggs ; when they are 
rubbed quite fine, put a little mustard, oil, 
and vinegar, and a little anchovy essence, 
a little pepper, and a small quantity of 
elder vinegar ; put it over the lobster : 
garnish with parsley. If for hot, put the 
lobster into a stewpan, with a little Italian 
sauce, and a little anchovy essence ; dish 
it, and garnish with croutons. 



A VQLEVENT OF EELS. 

Bone an eel and flat it ; cut it in pieces 
of about an inch long, and put it on to 
blanch in cold water ; when it comes to a 
boil, take it off the fire ; put the eel in 
cold water, and wash it very clean ; scrape 
the fat off; then put it in a stewpan, with 
a little stock, and set it on a stove to sim- 
mer very slow for a quarter of an hour, 
until the stock is quite reduced, (but not 



ROYAL COOK. 



147 



for the eel to stick to the bottom ;) put a 
little beshemell to it; put in about six 
yolks of eggs, boiled hard, and about a 
dozen button onions, nicely boiled ; put a 
little anchovy essence, squeeze a little 
lemon-juice, and fill the volevent ; first put 
it on a napkin, and then on a dish. If for 
meagre, use meagre stock. 



FILLET OF STURGEON, AND SAUCE 
ROYAL. 

Take the skin off a piece of a sturgeon 
of a pound or more ; cut it in long slices, 
(the same as you would salmon for rolling ;) 
flat them, and make a farce with a part of 
the sturgeon ; scrape fat bacon, sweet herbs, 
a roll soaked in cream, and the white of an 
egg beat up to a froth ; mix all together in 
a mortar, the egg last ; season with pepper 
and salt, and put a very little bit of garlic 
to the farce ; spread the farce on the stur- 
geon, roll it up, and finish it the same as 
fillets of sole ; put the sauce on the dish, 
and then the sturgeon. If for meagre, do 

II 2 



148 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



not use bacon ; make the sauce with fish 
stock. 



MORUE A LA CREME. 

Salt a slice of crimpt cod one day, and 
boil it the next ; and, while hot, break it 
in flakes ; put about half an ounce of butter 
into a stewpan, with a chopped shalot, 
parsley, and a spoonful of stock ; let it boil 
for a minute or two, then put a little flour, 
as much as will make it of a proper thick- 
ness ; then put a little stock ; (if for mea- 
gre, cream ;) give it a boil for a few mi- 
nutes, put a little anchovy essence, squeeze 
a little lemon-juice, and a dust of sugar ; 
put the fish in the sauce ; let it stand to 
get hot by the side of a stove, but do not 
let it boil ; put it as nearly in the middle 
of a dish as possible : garnish with paste 
and croutons. 

N. B. Crimpt cod that has been left the 
day before will do very well for this. 



ROYAL COOK. 



149 



ATLETS OF OYSTERS. 

Blanch the oysters and beard them ; 
put them on a skewer made for that pur- 
pose ; do them over with egg, sprinkle a 
little salt and pepper over them, and then 
put bread crumbs over; do the oysters 
twice over with egg and bread crumbs, 
drop some clarified butter over them with a 
paste brush, and broil them on a slow fire ; 
the gridiron should be brushed over with 
oiled butter, that the oysters may not stick 
to the bars : send the oysters on the skew- 
ers to table. 



FISH PIE, WITH TENCH AND EELS, AND 
HARD EGGS. 

Clean a brace of tench, and skin two 
eels ; bone the tench and eels, and cut the 
eels in pieces of two inches long ; leave the 
sides of the tench whole ; put the bones of 
the tench and eels into a stewpan, with a 
few onions, a little parsley, a few blades of 
mace, half a dozen anchovies, and a pint of 
stock ; (if for meagre, put water ;) set the 



150 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



stewpan on to boil very slowly for an hour, 
then strain it off, skim the fat from it, and 
put it to cool ; then put the tench and eels 
into a dish ; season it with pepper, salt, 
and chopped parsley ; put a few whole 
mushrooms in, and six or eight hard yolks 
of eggs ; add part of the liquor that the 
fish bones were boiled in ; put puffed paste 
round the edge of the dish, and cover it in ; 
about half an hour will bake it; the oven 
should be rather quick, otherwise the paste 
will not rise ; when the paste begins to 
colour, put some liquor over it ; when done, 
put the remainder of the liquor on the fire, 
to make hot, and pour it into the pie. 

N. B. The top of the pie should \)e 
done over with egg, before it goes into an 
oven. 



OYSTERS FRIED IN BATTER. 

Blanch a pint of large oysters, beard 
them, and lay them on a cloth to soak the 
liquor from them. Make the batter as 
follows t—break four eggs into a bason, and 
beat them up with a spoon ; then put about 



ROYAL COOK. 



151 



three or four spoonfuls of flour, and blend 
the eggs and flour well ; then put half a 
pint of new milk, a little at a time ; mix 
it all together, and put a little pepper and 
salt ; then put in the oysters ; put some 
lard (if not for meagre, clarified butter) 
into a stewpan, make it quite hot, and then 
put in the oysters, one at a time ; take 
them up with a sharp pointed skewer, and 
fry them of a nice light brown ; when done, 
take them up, and dish them on a napkin. 



VOLEVENT OF OYSTERS. 

Cut the vole vent out, and bake it ; put 
a pint and a half of oysters on to blanch ; 
when they come to boil, strain them off, 
and put them into cold water ; then beard 
them ; put a small piece of butter into a 
stewpan, and set it on the fire to melt ; when 
melted, put as much flour as will dry it up ; 
then pour in the oyster liquor, and stir it 
over the fire ; when it comes to boil, put a 
little beshemell, (if it is not for meagre; if 
it is, put a little cream, and a few drops of 



152 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



essence of anchovy ;) give it a boil up, then 
put in the oysters, and set the stewpan by 
the side of the fire, but mind that it does 
not boil ; before you fill the volevent, squeeze 
a little lemon-juice, and put a little pepper 
and salt, if wanted ; put the volevent in a 
napkin. 

N. B. All puff paste should be dished 
on a napkin, either for the first or second 
course, by way of soaking the butter up. 



ItIMAULADE OF SMELTS. 

Turn the smelts round ; put them into 
a stewpan with half a pint of "water, a 
quarter of a pint of vinegar, a glass of sherry 
wine, a few blades of mace, about a dozen 
of shalots, a little whole white pepper, a 
little salt, and about six anchovies, washed ; 
set the stewpan on the fire, let it boil very 
slow for about ten minutes, then take off 
the stewpan, and take the smelts out of it 
with a small slice ; pour the liquor over 
them, and put them to cool ; dish the 
smelts when cold ; strain the liquor over 



ROYAL COOK. 



158 



them, and garnish with parsley or chopped 
aspic. 



MATELOT OF CARP. 

Scale and clean the carp, and put them 
into a stewpan, with a pint of stock, a pint 
of port wine, two dozen of button onions, 
half a pottle of mushrooms, and a faggot, 
with a few blades of mace tied up in it , 
set it on the stove to stew for half an hour ; 
then put about half an ounce of butter into 
a stewpan, with chopped parsley, shalot, 
three or four anchovies, and a little stock ; 
set the stewpan on the fire to boil for a 
short time, then put a little flour, and add 
the liquor from the carp ; put it on the fire 
to boil, and keep stirring it all the time ; 
then rub it through a tammy-sieve, and 
put it to the carp, with about two dozen of 
oysters and liquor ; (the oysters should be 
blanched first ;) squeeze in half a lemon, 
and garnish with croutons. 



154 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



MATELOT OF CARP AND EEL. 

Bone the carp, put the bones into a 
stewpan, with four whole onions, a little 
parsley, basil, knotted and sweet marjoram, 
a pint of stock, a pint of port wine, and 
six or eight anchovies, unwashed ; set it on 
the fire to boil for an hour, then strain it 
off, and put it to the carp, with about three 
dozen of button onions ; set the stewpan 
on to simmer gently for an hour, then take 
it off ; put about two ounces of butter into 
a stewpan, set it on the fire to melt, put as 
much flour as will dry up the butter, and 
add the stock that the carp was stewed in ; 
set it on the fire, and keep stirring it, that 
it may not stick to the bottom ; add about 
half a pint of port wine : when boiled three 
or four minutes, rub it through a tammy, 
and put it to the carp, with about a pint of 
oysters (first being blanched and bearded), 
and the liquor ; give the carp one boil up, 
squeeze a lemon just before, dishing, and 
add a little essence of anchovy, if wanted ; 
put the carp on the dish, and the sauce 
over it : garnish witli croutons. 



ROYAL COOK. 



1 55 



f 



A PIKE OR JACK BAKED. 

Turn the pike round, fasten it with a 
skewer, and make some common stuffing*, 
the same as for a fillet of veal ; put it in 
the belly, and sew it up with packthread ; 
egg it over with a brush, and put bread 
crumbs over it ; then drop oiled butter 
over it with a paste brush ; slice a few 
onions, and put them in the dish the pike 
is to be baked in ; put a faggot of sweet 
herbs, a bay leaf or two, a little marjoram,, 
and a sprig of basil ; add a pint of stock 
and half a pint of sherry ; put it in the 
oven, so as to have it done half an hour 
before it is wanted ; strain the liquor from 
the pike, and skim the fat from it ; put 
about an ounce of butter into a stewpan, 
and set it on the fire to melt ; when melted, 
put as much flour as will dry it up ; stir it 
over the fire with a wooden spoon, and 
then put in the liquor the pike was baked 
in ; set it on the fire, and keep stirring it 
till it boils ; let it boil for a few minutes, 
then add a little essence of anchovy, and 
strain it through a tammy ; put it into the 



156 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



stewpan to keep hot until wanted ; squeeze 
half a lemon in it before it is sent to table ; 
put the pike on the dish, a little of the 
sauce round it, and the rest in a boat : re- 
member to take the pack-thread out, and 
likewise the skewers ; put some picked 
parsley on the middle of the pike, to give 
it a neat look. 



A SOUTIES OF SALMON, WITH CAPERS. 

Cut thin slices from a piece of split 
salmon, butter a souties-pan, and sprinkle 
it with chopped parsley, shalot, mushrooms, 
pepper, and salt ; set it on a stove five 
minutes before it is wanted : when it has 
been on the stove three minutes, turn it, 
and let it stav the same time, or there- 
about ; then take it off, and put it round 
the dish ; scrape the herbs, &c. into a stew- 
pan, put a little coulis and a few chopped 
capers; give it a boil, and put it in the 
middle of the dish the salmon is on. 



ROYAL COOK. 



157 



PICKLED SALMON. 

Pickled salmon is generally had from 
the oyster purveyors. If it should be de- 
sired to be pickled at home, it is done in the 
following manner : the salmon should of 
course be first cleaned and scaled, then 
split down the middle, and cut into proper 
sized pieces ; (the number of pieces that 
the salmon is to be cut into, depends upon 
the size of the salmon) ; put the salmon 
into a fish kettle, and as much cold water 
as will barely cover it ; add about a pint of 
vinegar, a handful of salt, about a dozen bay 
leaves, a little mace, and some white whole 
pepper : when the salmon is done, take it 
up, and lay it on a clean cloth ; put the 
liquor into a smaller vessel, and set it on a 
quick stove to boil until three parts reduced; 
then put it into a pan to cool ; when cold, 
put the s r aImon in. Salmon done in this way 
will retain its goodness for several months. 



CRAYFISH IN ASPIC. 

Put aspic in the mould, so as to be 
about a quarter of an inch thick ; let it 



158 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



stand until quite cold; ornament it the 
same as jelly marbre ; then put a little 
more aspic ; when that is cold, put more 
in, and the crayfish with the shells on, 
(only mind to choose those that have the 
reddest shells) ; when the last aspic is quite 
cold, fill the mould up, and put it to cool ; 
then turn it out, and garnish with sliced 
lemon. 



A SOUTIES OF CARP. 

Clean two carps of middling size ; or, 
if large, one will do ; butter a souties-pan, 
and sprinkle it with chopped shalot, pars- 
ley, a very little basil, pepper and salt, and 
a little Cayenne pepper ; bone the carp, and 
cut it into thin collops : flat them, and put 
them on the souties-pan ; set them on a 
slow stove for a few minutes ; then turn 
them, and let them stay for a few minutes 
longer ; then put them round the dish ; 
scrape the herbs, &c. into a stewpan, put a 
little coulis, one glass of port wine, and a 
little anchovy essence ; give it a boil up, 
squeeze a little lemon-juice in, and add a 



ROYAL COOK. 



159 



very little sugar ; put the sauce in the 
middle of the dish. 

N. B. If for meagre, make the sauce 
from the bones. 



EELS SPITCHCOCK. 

Skin two middle-sized eels, and bone 
them; flat them well ; then cut them in 
lengths of about two inches; put about a 
quarter of a pound of butter into a stewpan, 
with a little chopped shalots, parsley, sage, 
pepper, and salt ; set the stewpan over a 
stove ; when the butter is melted, take the 
stewpan off the fire, and put two yolks of 
egs : mix them well with butter, &c. then 
dip the eels, (one piece at a time), and roll 
it in bread crumbs ; make as much stick 
to the eel as you can ; either broil them, or 
do them in a souties-pan, the same as 
lamb cutlets ; they should be of a nice 
brown ; before they are dished, lay them 
on a clean cloth, to soak the fat from them ; 
put them round a dish, and picked parsley 
in the middle: send anchovy sauce in a 
boat. 



160 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



CARP BAKED. 

Put stuffing into the carp, turn it 
round, and brush it over with egg; put 
plenty of bread crumbs over it ; then drop 
oiled butter over the bread crumbs ; put it 
in a deep earthen dish, with a little stock, 
a few sliced onions, a few bay leaves, a 
little parsley, both sorts of marjoram, and 
a sprig or two of basil ; put in half a pint 
of port wine, and three anchovies ; put it 
in the oven ; it will take an hour to bake ; 
have the carp done a quarter of an hour 
before it is wanted, on account of having 
the liquor that it was baked in to make 
the sauce ; put about an ounce of butter 
into a stewpan, and set it on the fire to 
melt ; then put as much flour as will dry 
it up ; put in the liquor from the carp, give 
it a boil, and keep stirring it during the 
time it is on the fire ; when it has boiled, 
take it from the fire, and squeeze a lemon 
in ; put a little Cayenne pepper and a little 
sugar; put the carp on the dish, garnish 
with parsley, and send the sauce in a 
boat. 



ROYAL COOK. 



161 



N. B. If the carp is for a meagre day, 
put butter in the stuffing instead of suet, 
and use water instead of stock ; or fish 
stock, if convenient : observe this in all 
meagre dishes. 

O 



SALMON. 

Take a piece of salmon of five or six 
pounds weight, (or larger, according to 
your company) ; cut it into slices about an 
inch thick ; after which, make a force-meat 
thus : — take some of the flesh off the sal- 
mon, and the same quantity of the meat off 
an eel, with a few mushrooms ; season it 
with pepper, salt, nutmeg, and cloves, and 
beat it all together till it is very fine : boil 
the crumb of a roll in milk, and beat it up 
with four eggs till it is thick ; then let it 
cool ; add four raw eggs to it, and mix the 
whole together ; take the skin from the 
salmon, and lay the slices in a dish ; cover 
every slice with the force-meat ; pour some 
melted butter over them, with a few crumbs 
of bread, and place oysters round the dish ; 
put it in the oven ; and, when it is of a fine 



162 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



brown, pour a little melted butter with 
some red wine boiled in it, and over it the 
juice of a lemon : serve it up hot to table. 



TURBOT. 

Take a dish about the size of the tur- 
bot, and rub butter thick all over it ; throw 
on a little salt, a little beaten pepper, half 
a large nutmeg, and some parsley chopped 
fine ; pour in a pint of white wine, cut off 
the head and tail, and lay the turbot in the 
dish ; pour another pint of white wine all 
over ; grate the other half of the nutmeg 
over it, and add a little pepper, some salt, 
and chopped parsley ; lay a piece of butter, 
here and there, all over ; then strew it with 
flour and crumbs of bread : being thus pre- 
pared, put it in the oven, and let it be done 
of a fine brown colour ; when you take it 
out, put the tuibot into the dish in which 
you mean to serve it up : then stir the 
sauce into the dish it was baked in ; pour 
it into a saucepan, shake in a little flour, 
and let it boil ; then stir in a piece of butter, 



ROYAL COOK. 



103 



with two spoonfuls of catsup; when the 
whole boils, pour it into a bason, and serve 
it up with the fish : garnish your dish with 
lemon ; and you may add whatever sauce 
you chuse, as shrimps, anchovies, mush- 
rooms, &CC. 



HADDOCKS AND WHITINGS. 

When you have gutted and washed 
them clean, dry them well in a cloth, and 
rub a little vinegar over them, which will 
prevent the skin from breaking; having 
done this, drudge them well with flour, and, 
before you put them on, rub the gridiron 
well with beef suet: let your gridiron be very 
hot when you lay your fish on, otherwise 
they will stick to it, and the fish be broke 
in turning : while they are boiling, turn 
them two or three times ; and, wdien done, 
serve them up, with plain melted butter or 
shrimp sauce. 

Another, and indeed a very excellent 
method of broiling these fish, is thus : — 
when you have cleaned and dried them, as 
before mentioned, put them into a tin oven. 



164 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



and set them before a quick fire : as soon 
as the skins begin to rise, take them from 
the fire ; having beat up an egg, rub it 
over them with a feather, sprinkle a few 
bread crumbs over them, drudge them well 
with flour, and rub your gridiron, when 
hot, with suet, or butter ; lay on your fish, 
and, when you have turned them, rub over 
a little butter, and keep turning them till 
they are done enough. 



TURTLE. 

Tie a cord to the hind fins of the turtle, 
and hang it up ; then tie another cord to 
the fore fins, by way of pinioning it, (that 
it should not beat itself, and be trouble- 
some to the person who cuts off the head) ; 
then cut off the head, (this do the evening 
before you intend dressing it), and lay the 
turtle on a block, on the back shell ; then 
loose the shell round the edge, by cutting 
it ; then raise the shell clean off from the 
flesh, next take out the gall with great 
care ; then cut the fore fins off; all the 



ROYAL COOK. 



165 



flesh will come with them ; then cut the 
hind fins off; take the liver (as whole as 
you can) from the entrails ; likewise the 
heart and kidneys ; then cut the entrails 
round the back bone, and put them in a 
bucket ; wash the shell in several waters, 
to clean it from the blood, and turn it 
down to drain ; in the meantime, cut the 
fins from the lean meat, and cut the white, 
or belly shell, into about twelve or fourteen 
pieces ; turn up the back shell, and take all 
the fat from it, (take it out the same as if 
you were skinning any thing), and put it 
into a stewpan ; saw the rim of the back 
shell about six inches deep, (a strong lock- 
saw is what should be used), and cut it into 
about ten or twelve pieces ; set the large 
stewpan on the fire full of water, and, when 
it comes to a boil, dip a fin in it for a mi- 
nute or two ; then take it out and peel it 
very clean ; when that is done, take ano- 
ther ; and so on, until all are done ; then 
the head ; next the shell, piece by piece ; 
be careful to take off all the outside peel 
and shell ; then put the shell into a stew- 
pan, with about eighteen large onions and 



1G6 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



a faggot of turtle herbs ; fill it up with 
water, and set it on the fire to boil ; when 
it comes to a boil, set it at the fire-side to 
boil slow until it becomes quite tender; 
next cut the fore fins into four pieces each, 
the hind fins into two each, and put them 
into a stewpan that will just hold them ; 
put twelve onions and a faggot of turtle 
herbs ; put as much water as will cover the 
fins, and set them on a stove ; when it 
comes to a boil, set it at the fire-side to 
boil until the fins become tender, so that all 
the bones will draw out ; take up the fins 
and draw all the bones with great care ; 
then take up the other parts, and do the 
same ; do not mix them, but lay them on 
different dishes ; strain the liquor that both 
were boiled in into one pan ; cut off the 
lean meat, for entres, such as for fricandeau, 
grenadines, collops, for roasting ; boiling, 
as chickens, pates, cutlets, and semels ; 
then put about a pound of fresh butter into 
a soup-pot, and all the lean meat that is 
left, three fowls, a faggot of turtle herbs, a 
dozen of onions, tw r o pounds of lean ham, 
(this should be put at the bottom of the 

1 



ROYAL COOK. 



167 



pot, and a bottle of Madeira wine) ; set the 
pot on the stove to draw down ; be careful 
in not having too fierce a fire ; when it has 
steamed for an hour, fill up the pot with 
the liquor that the fins and shells were 
boiled in ; when it comes to a boil, take 
the pot from the trivet, and set it at the 
side to boil very slow for two hours ; then 
strain it off, pick what lean meat you want 
for the tureens, and put it in a stewpan, 
with a little of the stock, to keep it hot : 
when the stock is boiling, set a person to 
scour and scald the entrails ; you must be 
particular in seeing that they are very 
clean ; then cut them in pieces about two 
inches long ; put them on to blanch in 
cold water ; then wash them out, and cover 
the bottom of a stewpan with fat bacon ; 
put in the entrails, about a quart of stock, 
a few onions, and cover them over with 
sheets of bacon, and over that a sheet of 
white paper ; let them stew very gently for 
three hours ; put in two lemons that have 
been peeled, and cut in slices, before they 
are covered with the l xm ; the liver is 
best as a sou ties ; the lie 1 belongs to the 



168 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



fins ; put two pounds of butter into a stew- 
pan, with a pound of the best Westphalia 
ham, cut very fine, some chopped mush- 
rooms, truffles, shalot, parsley, (double the 
quantity of any other herbs), sweet marjo- 
ram, knotted ditto, lemon and orange thyme, 
common thyme, basil (about half as much 
as of the other herbs), a Spanish onion, and 
a pint of good stock ; set the stewpan over 
a slow stove to simmer for an hour, then 
put a plateful of flour ; keep stirring it about 
for a few minutes over the fire, then put 
in the turtle stock (by a little at a time, as, 
were it all put in at once, you could not 
mix the flour so well), and four or five 
quarts of good stock, or as much as you 
think will be wanted, and one bottle of 
Madeira ; let it boil for a few minutes, 
then rub it through a tammy, return it 
into a soup-pot, and callipee and callipash 
with it; cut it in pieces of about two 
inches square, or thereabouts ; put the fins 
into another soup-pot, and some of the 
turtle-soup with them ; put force-meat and 
egg-balls to both ; the green fat should be 
boiled by itself in stock, and a little Ma- 

7 



ItOYAL COOK. 



1(>9 



deira wine ; when done, cut it in small 
pieces, and put it to the soup ; season the 
soup with Cayenne pepper and a little fine 
spice ; be careful in using Cayenne pepper, 
as it is easy for the company to add a little, 
if necessary ; squeeze four lemons and 
three Seville oranges into a bason, and put 
a pint of Madeira wine, a table-spoonful of 
sifted sugar, and a little salt, if wanted ; 
put three parts to the soup, and the other 
to the fins ; this should not be put in until 
a few minutes before dishing time ; be 
careful that it does not boil after the lemon 
is put in ; if the shell is sent up to table, 
put a rim of hot paste round it ; ornament 
it as fancy directs ; put it in the oven with 
a little of the turtle stock ; when sent to 
table, fill it as you would a tureen ; put 
what lean meat you have in the tureens, 
before the soup ; if the lean meat is put to 
the soup, it is apt to boil to pieces, and 
spoil the look of the turtle ; if the turtle is 
for meagre, use either fowl, veal, or ham ; 
but none of the lean meat can be spared for 
made dishes, as it will all be wanted for the 
soup. 



I 



170 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



SWEETS. 



CHANTILLA CAKE. 

Cut a piece out of the top of a savoy 
cake, and scoop out the inside ; put it on 
the dish that is to be sent to table ; pour 
Lisbon wine into the cake, as the wine 
soaks out ; pour it over the cake with the 
spoon ; when the cake has absorbed as 
much wine as it can, pour the remainder 
in the dish, and pour custard down the sides, 
and also pour some in the middle ; whip 
up some cream, the same as for a trifle, 
and put it in the middle of the cake; 
blanch a few sweet almonds, cut them in 
quarters, and stick them round the edges 
and on the sides of the cake. 



SPANISH FRITTERS. 

Grate two lemons with a fine grater ; 
put them into a stewpan, with a little 



ItOYAL COOK. 



171 



water, a bit of cinnamon, and four or five 
cloves ; set the stewpan on the stove to boil 
for a few minutes ; take out tlje spice, and 
put about two ounces of butter ; when 
melted, put in about four spoonfuls of flour, 
and one of sifted sugar ; keep stirring it 
over the fire for a few minutes ; then take 
it off, and break in six eggs, one at a time ; 
keep beating it up until all the eggs are in ; 
then beat it up for a few minutes, until it 
becomes a nice smooth batter, and then 
put in a glass of brandy : put some lard in 
a stewpan, make it hot, and drop the batter 
in with a tea-spoon ; when they are of a 
nice brown, take them up, and put them on 
the back of a sieve ; sift sugar over them, 
and dish them on a napkin. 

N. B. The batter should be thick. 



A SOUFFLE OF GINGER. 

Put a pint of milk and cream on to 
boil ; put the peel of two lemons, a little 
cinnamon, and a lump of sugar, to make it 
sweet ; let it bo|l for hal£ an hour, and then 

I 2 



172 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



put it to cool ; then put a quarter of a 
pound of butter into a stewpan (that will 
hold two quarts), and set it on the fire to 
melt ; when melted, put in as much flour 
as will dry up the butter ; keep stirring it 
over the fire until it leaves the bottom of 
the stewpan ; then take it off, and break 
in ten eggs, one at a time ; keep stirring it 
till the egg is mixed well with the flour 
and butter ; mix all the eggs the same 
way, until it becomes a thick batter ; 
then put a sufficient quantity of the milk 
and cream that have been boiled ; beat it 
up well together, (otherwise the eggs would 
separate in the boiling) ; and, when mixed, 
put half a pound of West India preserved 
ginger, cut in small pieces, a large glass of 
brandy, and a little nutmeg; butter a 
savoy cake-mould very thick with butter, 
not with the hand, but with a paste-brush ; 
stick dry cherries on the mould in any 
manner your fancy directs ; put the souffle 
in, and put the mould into a stewpan that 
has boiling water that will come better 
than half way up the mould; cover the 
stewpan, and put lighted charcoal on the 



ROYAL COOK. 



ITS 



cover; keep it boiling 1 very slow for an 
hour, or better ; take the mould out of the 
stewpan about ten minutes before it is 
wanted, by which means the souffle will 
keep firmer ; before it is turned out of the 
mould run the knife round it, by way of 
loosening it ; pour white wine sauce over it. 
The wine sauce is made as follows : — put 
about an ounce of butter into a stewpan ; 
when melted, put about half a table-spoon- 
ful of flour ; stir it until it is mixed with 
the butter, then add white wine to it, to 
make it of the thickness of melted butter ; 
grate a little nutmeg in it, and put about 
half a glass of brandy in the sauce ; pour 
the sauce over the souffle. 



A RATIFIE PUDDING. 

Put a pint of milk and a pint of cream 
into a stewpan, with the peel of two lemons, 
a little cinnan^on, and sugar ; set it on the 
fire, and let it boil for half an hour ; then 
strain it into a bason, and put the crumb of 
two French rolls into it ; then butter a 



174 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



Savoy mould-cake, and stick dry cherries 
according to fancy ; then put in half a 
pound of ratifies in the mould ; break ten 
eggs in the bason, beat them up well, then 
put the eggs to the boiled milk, cream, and 
rolls ; stir it well, so as to blend the rolls, 
eggs, and milk together ; then put it in the 
mould that has the ratifies in : finish the 
same as the ginger souffle : pour wine 
sauce over it. 



RICE SOUFFLE. 

Line a mould (to answer the size of the 
dish) with tart paste ; put a piece of bread in 
it to keep it from falling, and put it in the 
oven to bake ; when done, take it out, and 
put it to cool ; then put about a quarter of a 
pound of Carolina rice on to blanch in cold 
water ; when it comes to a boil, take it off, 
and wash it in two or three waters ; then 
put the rice into about three pints of new 
milk ; put it on to boil ; l^eep stirring it 
with a spoon, otherwise it will stick to the 
bottom ; while the rice is boiling, put a 
little cinnamon and lemon-peel into about 



ROYAL COOK. 



175 



half a pint of milk, and let it boil some 
time, so as to get the flavour of the cinna- 
mon and lemon-peel ; when you think it is 
boiled enough, strain it into the rice ; when 
the rice is done, put a quarter of a pound 
of butter, and as much sifted lump sugar 
as will sweeten it, and a glass of brandy ; 
then whisk up the whites of four eggs, and 
put them to the rice : mix the whites of 
eggs well together, put it into the paste, 
and then in the oven to bake ; first sift a 
little sugar over it : about fifteen minutes 
will bake it. 



DARIOLES, (SO CALLED FROM THE 
NAME OF THE MOULDS.) 

Make a bit of half puff-paste, sheet the 
moulds, but first butter them, and dust them 
with flour ; half bake the paste ; then fill 
them with custard, made as follows : — put 
a pint of milk, a pint of cream, a little cin- 
namon, and the peel of a lemon, into a 
stewpan ; set it on to boil for a quarter of 
an hour, and then let it cool ; beat up the 
yolks of eight eggs in a bason, sweeten it. 



176 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



with sifted lump sugar, pour the cream, kc. 
in, a little at a time ; then mix it well, and 
strain it through a hair-sieve ; set it again 
on the fire, and, when it begins to thicken, 
fill the darioles, and put them in the oven 
for ten minutes ; when done, turn them 
out, and dish them ; sift a little fine sugar 
over them, and glaze them with a sala- 
mander. 



CLEAR JELLY, ORNAMENTED OR PLAIN. 

Put the jelly-stock into a stewpan ; put 
about a handful of isinglass w’ith it, a little 
cinnamon, a few cloves, and a few corian- 
der seeds ; put the jelly-stock on the stove 
to melt ; when melted, take it off; for two 
quarts of jelly-stock, peel (very thin) six 
lemons and six Seville oranges ; rub sugar 
to six more lemons and six more Seville 
oranges ; then squeeze them all into a 
bason that has the peel in, and the sugar 
that has been rubbed to the lemon and 
oranges ; put a bottle of Lisbon wine, and 
about half a pint of brandy ; put all this to 
the jelly-stock, then break eighteen eggs 



~ ROYAL COOK. 



177 



(leaving out twelve yolks), whites, shells, 
and the six yolks, beat up together, and 
put them to the jelly-stock ; put sugar 
sufficient to sweeten it ; put it on the lire, 
have a whisk, and keep whisking it until 
it boils ; then put it to the side of the stove 
to boil for about five minutes ; take it from 
the fire, put the cover on, and put lighted 
charcoal on the cover, and let it stay for 
half an hour ; then put it into the jelly-bag, 
prepared in a stand for that purpose ; re- 
turn it into the jelly-bag until it is clear, 
* 

which is known by trying it in a glass ; 
cover it up quite close to keep it warm, as 
by that means it will run the better : as 
for ornamenting, that must depend on 
fancy. 



RASPBERRY CREAM. 

Boil a quarter of an ounce of isinglass 
in a very little water ; when dissolved, 
strain it through a hair-sieve ; while warm, 
put it to a quart of cream ; keep whisking 
it up while putting the isinglass in ; warm 
about half a pint of raspberry jelly, and put 

i 5 



178 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



it to the cream ; add a little sifted sugar 
and a small glass of brandy ; whisk it up 
well, until it becomes quite thick ; then 
put it into the mould. 

N. B. In summer, use fresh raspberries ; 
about a pint will make a mould of about a 
pint and a half ; rub it through a tammy. 



CEDERATA CREAM. 

Boil a quarter of an ounce of isinglass 
in a very little water ; w r hen dissolved, 
strain it into a quart of good cream ; keep 
whisking the cream while the isinglass is 
putting in, to hinder it from settling ; then 
put in a glass of brandy and a table-spoon- 
ful of extract of cederata; whisk it well 
up, until it becomes quite thick ; then put it 
into the mould : garnish with sliced orange, 
if in season. 

N. B. Add lump sugar. 



COFFEE CREAM, IN CUPS. 

Boil a quart of cream, and put a little 
isinglass in, (about half an ounce will be 



ROYAL COOK. 



170 



sufficient) ; strain the cream, and put about 
a pint of strong coffee ; sweeten it with 
sugar-candy, and put about a table spoon- 
ful of cederata, (if to be had) ; put the 
cream into a pan, and whisk it up for 
about five minutes ; then put the cream in 
the cups. 



TARTLETS. 

Sheet the tartlet-pan with puff-paste ; 
put what sweet-meat you think proper, 
cross-bar them, and put them in the oven 
to bake ; when done, put them on paper, 
to soak the butter from the paste. 



GATEAU MILLEFLEUR. 

A gateau millefleur is cut out of puff- 
paste ; (there are millefleur cutters for that 
purpose) ; put different sweet-meats in 
every piece ; spin carmel sugar over all, as 
it hinders the paste from falling out. 



180 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



RHENISH CREAM. 

Bfat up the yolks of eight egg's very 
fine ; add a quart of jelly, by a little at a 
time ; then strain it through a lawn-sieve ; 
stir it until nearly cold, and then put it into 
a mould : garnish with China orange. 



COMPOTE OF PEARS. 

Peel the pears, cut them down the 
middle, and take out the core ; put about 
half a pound of sugar on to boil in about 
half a pint of water ; skim it until it is quite 
clear, then put a pint of port wine to it ; 
put the pears into a preserving-pan, and 
pour the sugar and w ine over them ; put in 
about two dozen of cloves ; cover them over 
with paper, and let them boil gently until 
tender ; they will take two hours : this 
quantity of sugar and wine will do for 
twelve pears. 



A TRIFLE. 

Cut a few slices off a savoy cake, and 
put them at the bottom of a trifle-dish. 



ROYAL COOK. 



181 



(which is something 1 like a salad-dish, in 
respect to depth) ; lay a layer of macaroons 
on them, and a layer of ratifees ; pour a 
pint of Lisbon over the cakes, leave it long 
enough to soak all the wine up, and then 
cover the cakes with custard, made in the 
following manner : — put a quart ol milk 
and cream mixed, and a little cinnamon, 
lemon-peel, and sugar ; let it boil for half 
an hour ; take it ofT the stove, and put it 
to cool : to this quantity of milk and cream 
put the yolks of eight eggs, and a spoonful 
of flour; beat them up in a bason, with a 
spoon, very well ; put the milk in by little 
at a time, and keep stirring it all the 
while ; then strain it through a hair- sieve 
into a stewpan; put it on a i ri.sk fire, and 
be sure to keep stirring it until it comes to 
a boil ; then take it off', and put it to cool ; 
when half cold, add a glass of brandy and 
a few spoonfuls of ratifee ; then cover the 
cakes with it, and lay apricot jam upon the 
custard ; then put a pint of good cream 
into a bason, w ith the v. hite of an egg, a 
lump of sugar rubbed to a lemon, and 
about two glasses of white wine ; beat it 



183 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



up with a whisk, and skim the froth >vith 
a spoon that lias holes it ; lay the froth on 
the back of the sieve, which should be laid 
upon a dish, to save the drainings to return 
into the pan again, for whipping ; lay the 
whipped cream over the trifle ; put a few 
harlequin seeds in any form you think pro- 
per : garnish the edge of the dish with pre~ 
served orange, or dried orange-peel. 



BLANC MANGE. 

Put an ounce of isinglass into a stewparr,. 
with half a pint of water ; let it simmer 
very gently until the isinglass is quite dis- 
solved, then strain it into a pint of cream 
and a pint of milk mixed ; put the peel of 
a lemon in, and a little cinnamon and 
sugar ; let it boil for fifteen minutes ; 
blanch two ounces of sweet almonds and 
half an ounce of bitter almonds ; pound 
them until they are fine enough to go 
through a tammy ; then mix them with 
the milk and cream, &c. ; let all boil for a 
few minutes ; then rub it through a tam- 



ROYAL COOK. 



IBS 



my, so as to get all the almonds through ; 
then put a glass of white brandy to it ; 
when getting cold, put it in a mould. 

N. B. When a larger quantity is wanted, 
use almonds and isinglass accordingly. 



APPLE AND BARBERRY TART. 

Shee r a tart-pan with short pagte ; put 
half apple and half barberries ; put sugar, 
and cover it in, and finish the same as other 
tarts. 



ICEING FOR RICH CAKES. 

Put one pound of very fine sifted treble- 
refined sugar into a bason, and the whites 
of three new laid eggs ; beat the sugar and 
eggs up well with a spoon, until they be- 
come very white, and quite thick ; the 
more it is beat up, the whiter and thicker 
it will get ; when done, put it over a cake 
with a spoon, smooth it with a knife, and 
garnish it according to fancy. 

N. B. Put the ornaments on before the 
iceing becomes dry. 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



181 



SPONGE BISCUITS Oil CAKES. 

Take fourteen ounces of very fine flour 
dried and sifted, one pound of lump sugar 
sifted through a lawn-sieve, and the rind of 
two lemons grated ; put a deep pan either 
over a very slow stove or before the fire, so 
- as to make the pan quite hot ; (be very 
careful that the pan is free from greese ; if 
the parf has been used for any thing else, 
rub the inside with a little flour); break 
twelve eggs into a bason, then put them 
into the pan, and whisk them up until the 
eggs become quite thick ; then put in the 
sugar, and whisk it up for about five mi- 
nutes over a very slow stove ; then let it 
stand while you are buttering the pans, 
which require very great attention ; the 
butter should be worked about the pan 
until it becomes like cream, and very thick ; 
then beat up the eggs again for about five 
minutes ; then take the whisk out, and 
knock it on the sides of the pan, to get the 
batter from it; then put in the flour and 
lemon-peel, and mix it up with the spoon ; 
then fill the pans ; put them on a baking 



ROYAL COOK. 



185 



slieet, and sift a little sugar over them 
through a lawn-sieve, and put them in the 
oven ; the oven should be very quick ; they 
will not take many minutes ; when done, 
take them out of the pans, and lay them 
on a dish, bottom upwards ; wipe the pans 
very clean while hot. 

N. B. This batter will do for Naples 
biscuits, and different kinds of drops. 
Naples biscuit-mould's are different from 
the sponge cake-moulds ; they are to be 
had at any tin-shop. 



MUSHROOM FRITTERS. 

Make batter the same way as for pan- 
cakes, only make it thicker, otherwise it 
will not stick to the mould ; (the mould is 
made by Mr. Buhle of St. Martin’s Lane) ; 
have some lard hot in a stewpan, and have 
sweet oil in a tea-cup, or something of the 
same size, to dip the mould in ; drain the 
oil from it, then dip it in the batter, and 
then immediately in the hot lard ; take it 
out as soon as the fritter becomes brown, 



186 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



lay them on white kitchen paper, to soak 
the lard from them ; fill the hollow part 
with custard ; sift fine sugar, and hold the 
salamander over to glaze the fritters ; dish 
them on a napkin. 



PEU D ’AMOURS. 

Peu d ’amours are made of puff-paste 
cut out in what shape is thought proper ; 
put them on a baking sheet ; brush them 
over with the white of egg ; sift a little 
fine sugar over them, and put them in the 
oven ; when done, and cold, put any sweet- 
meat that is most convenient ; dish them in 
the shape of a pyramid. 



ORANGE CREAM. 

Squeeze twelve China oranges into one 
quart of jelly ; beat up six yolks of eggs 
with a little warm jelly ; strain it to the 
main part, and keep stirring it until it be- 
gins to set ; then put it into the mould. 



ROYAL COOK. 



187 



CHINA ORANGE JELLY. 

Rub the bloom of six China oranges 
upon half a pound of sugar ; peel three 
Seville oranges and three lemons very thin ; 
put them into a stewpan with a pint of 
water, one ounce of isinglass, a little cin- 
namon, a few coriander seeds, and a few 
cloves ; boil all together until the isinglass 
is dissolved ; then strain it in a bason ; put 
a pint of white wine and a glass of brandy 
to it, the juice of the Seville and China 
oranges and lemons, and the sugar that 
was rubbed to the China oranges ; keep 
stirring it until nearly cold, then put it 
into a mould : garnish with China orange 
sliced. 

N. B. If you should have clear jelly to 
spare, that will answer the purpose better 
than making it from isinglass ; rub the 
bloom of six China oranges upon a cpiarter 
of a pound of sugar, squeeze the oranges, 
strain the juice, and put that and the sugar 
to a quart of clear jelly ; keep stirring it 
until cold, then put it in the mould. 



188 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



ORANGE SOUFFLE. 

Orange souffle, is orange jelly put into 
a pan, and whisked until nearly stiff; then 
put in the mould : garnish with China 
orange. 



GUM PASTE FOR ORNAMENTS. 

Take what quantity of gum-dragon you 
think proper, put it into a small deep sweet- 
meat pot ; put as much warm water as will 
cover it, and cover it over with paper ; 
when it has stood about six hours, take it 
out of the pot, and turn it upside down ; 
then put it in the pot again, with as much 
more water ; let it stand all night ; next 
day strain it through a cloth ; then put it 
in a mortar, with a little treble refined 
sugar, sifted through a fine drum-sieve ; it 
will take at least one hour pounding ; when 
it is pounded enough, it will draw into 
strings, and crack against a mortar ; put a 
little fine hair-powder in it before you take 
it out of the mortar ; when taken out of 
the mortar, w r ork it up with treble-refined 



ROYAL COOK. 



189 



sugar, sifted as before mentioned, and one- 
third hair-powder ; make as many colours 
as you please ; then make what ornaments 
are wanted. 



A TAPIOCA PUDDING, EITHER BAKED 
OR BOILED. 

Put half a pound of Tapioca in a stew- 
pan, with cold water ; set it on the fire till 
it comes to a boil ; then strain it off, and 
boil it in a quart of new milk ; let it boil 
slow until it has soaked up all the milk, 
then put it into a bason to cool ; break ten 
eggs, leave out four whites, beat them up, 
and sweeten with moist sugar ; add a glass 
of brandy, two ounces of oiled butter, and 
nutmeg ; either bake or boil it. 



A BEST SORT OF PLUM PUDDING. 

A pound of raisins stoned, a pound of 
currants, well washed and picked, a pound 
of suet chopped very fine, a pound of flour, 
and as much bread crumbs, a little pounded 
spice, an ounce of preserved lemon-peel, an 



190 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



ounce of orange-peel, an ounce of citron, 
about half a nutmeg grated, and a quarter 
of a pound of moist sugar ; mix all toge- 
ther by rubbing it betwixt your hands, and 
then put it in a bason ; break eight eggs 
into it ; put about half a pint of new milk, 
and two glasses of brandy ; stir it up well 
with a wooden spoon ; be careful not to 
wet it too much, for if it is not very thick, 
the fruit will settle at the bottom ; it will 
take four hours to boil. 



MERINGUES. 

Beat up the whites of four new-laid 
eggs \yith half a pound of double-refined 
sugar, very finely sifted ; beat it up with a 
silver spoon until it becomes thick, like 
paste ; put about a tea- spoonful of cederata 
in it ; if you have not that, grate a lemon 
in it ; when finished, get a sheet of writ- 
ing paper, put it upon a baking sheet, and 
drop the batter on the paper; drop it 
rather of an oval; sift some fine sugar 
over them, and put them in the oven for a 
l 



ROYAL COOK. 



191 



few minutes ; the oven should be rather 
slow ; be careful not to let them burn ; 
when done, take them off the paper, by run- 
ning a knife under them, but very gently, for 
fear of breaking them ; put a little sweet- 
meat in them, and stick two together ; they 
are very proper to fill caramel baskets, or 
gum paste ditto, or on a dish for second 
course — or supper. 



SMALL CURD AND ALMOND PUDDING, 

BAKED. 

Get some cheese-curd ; put it on a hair- 
sieve to drain the whey from it; put a 
pewter plate over it, and the weight of 
eight or ten pounds, to press it quite dry ; 
then rub the curd through a hair- sieve, 
(and put about a quarter of a pound of 
butter to about a quarter of a pound of 
curd, to be rubbed through with the curd) ; 
put it in a bason, and break eight eggs, 
(leave out six whites) ; sweeten it with 
sifted lump sugar ; grate two lemons in it, 
some nutmeg, and a glass of brandy ; add 



192 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



about two ounces of sweet almonds, about 
eight or ten bitter almonds, and a few cur- 
rants ; butter the mould well with a paste 
brush ; then throw in some fine bread 
crumbs, so as to stick to the sides ; fill the 
mould, and let them bake for half an hour 
in a quick oven ; then turn them out, and 
pour wine sauce over them : the same pre- 
paration will do for a large mould, if you 
want to match any thing similar to it. 

N. B. Crumble six sponge biscuits in, or 
an equal quantity of Savoy cake ; or French 
roll, if the latter is not convenient. 



SAVOY CAKE. 

To one pound of fine sifted sugar put 
the yolks of ten eggs, (the whites are to be 
put in a separate pan) ; beat the yolks and 
sugar up well with a wooden -spoon for 
half an hour ; then whisk the whites up 
until they become quite stiff, and white ; 
(stir them into the batter, by little at a 
time) ; when all is in, add three quarters of 
a pound of flour that has been dried before 



ROYAL COOK. 



19S 



the fire, and the rind of a lemon, grated ; 
then put the mixture into the moulds ; 
, they should be baked in a very slow oven ; 
when you think they are done, run a knife 
down the middle ; if the knife comes out 
quite clean, the cakes are done ; the mould 
should be prepared before you begin the 
cakes, in the following manner : — have 
some clarified fresh butter, and butter the 
moulds with a small brush, (what the 
painters call a tool) ; mix about three ounces 
of very fine mixed sugar with about an ounce 
of flour : then throw it all into one mould, 
and shake it about well ; turn it out into 
the other mould, and knock the mould 
upon the table, so as to leave no more sugar 
than sticks to the mould ; be very parti- 
cular with the moulds : there is as much art 
in preparing the mould, as in mixing the 
batter for the cake : when for second 
course, or suppers, they are ornamented 
with gum paste. 



K 



194 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A CUSTARD PUDDING, EITHER BAKED 
OR BOILED. 

Boil a pint of milk and a pint of cream 
together, with cinnamon, lemon-peel, and 
nutmeg, for half an hour; strain it, and 
put it to cool ; break eight eggs, (leaving 
out four whites), and add about a table- 
spoonful of flour ; beat them well ; then 
add the milk and cream that have been 
boiled, and a glass of brandy : if for baking, 
put thin puff-paste at the bottom of the 
dish (first buttering it) and round the rim ; 
then strain the custard into the dish; it 
will take about twenty minutes : if for 
boiling, butter the mould, and let it boil 
about half an hour : garnish the dish you 
send it up in with currant jelly, and pour 
wine sauce over it. 



CHESNUT PUDDING. 

Boil a dozen and a half of chesnuts a 
quarter of an hour ; blanch, peel, and beat 
them in a mortar, with a little orange-flour. 



ROYAL COOK. 



19 o 



or rose-water, and white wine, till of a fine 
thin paste; beat op twelve eggs, with the 
whites ; grate half a nutmeg in three pints 
of cream, a little salt, and half a pound of 
melted butter ; sweeten it, and mix all to- 
gether ; put it over the fire, and stir it till 
thick ; lay puff paste over the dish ; pour 
the mixture in the dish, and send it to the 
oven : when cream cannot be got, take 
three pints of milk ; beat up the yolks of 
four eggs, and stir them into the milk : set 
it over the fire, stir it all the time, till 
scalding hot, and use this instead of cream. 



A CITRON PUDDING. 

Take a spoonful of flour, two ounces of 
sugar, nutmeg, and half a pint of cream ; 
mix them together, with three yolks of 
eggs ; put them into tea-cups, and add two 
ounces of citron, cut very thin : bake 
them in a quick oven, and turn them out 
upon a dish. 



196 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A GEORGE PUDDING. 

Boil a handful of rice in a little milk 
till tender, with a piece of lemon -peel ; 
drain it, mix with it a dozen of good sized 
apples, boiled to a pulp as dry as possible ; 
add a glass of white wine, the yolks of five 
eggs, two ounces of orange and citron, cut 
thin, and sugar ; line the mould or bason 
with the paste ; beat the whites of eggs to 
a very strong froth, and mix with the other 
ingredients ; fill the bowl, and make it 
brown ; serve it, bottom upwards, with the 
following sauce : — two glasses of white 
wine, a spoonful of sugar, the yolks of two 
eggs, and a bit of butter ; simmer, without 
boiling ; pour it to and from the saucepan 
till of a proper thickness, then put it on the 
pudding. 



GOOSEBERRY PUDDING. 

Stew gooseberries till they will pulp ; 
take a pint of the juice, pressed through a 
sieve, and beat it with three eggs, beaten 
and strained : add an ounce and a half of 



ROYAL COOK. 



197 



butter ; sweeten and put the crust round 
the dish : a few crumbs of roll should be 
mixed with the above, or four ounces of 
Naples biscuits. 



A GRATEFUL PUDDING. 

To one pound of flour put a pound of 
grated bread; take eight eggs, with half 
the whites ; beat them up, and mix with 
them a pint of new milk ; stir in the bread 
and flour, a pound of raisins, stoned, a 
pound of currants, half a pound of sugar, 
and a little beaten ginger ; mix all well 
together, pour it into your dish, and put it 
in the oven : cream, instead of milk, will 
be a great improvement. 



LADY SUNDERLAND’S PUDDING. 

Beat up the yolks of eight eggs with 
the whites of three ; add five spoonfuls of 
flour, and a nutmeg grated, and put them 
into a pint of cream ; butter the inside of 
small basons ; fill them half full, and hake 
them an hour : when done, turn them out 



198 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



of the basons ; pour melted butter over 
them, with white wine and sugar. 



ITALIAN PUDDING. 

Lay puffed paste at the bottom and 
round the edge of a dish ; over which pour 
a pint of cream, French rolls grated, and 
half a pound of marrow sliced ; take ten 
eggs, beaten fine, a nutmeg grated, twelve 
pippins sliced, some orange-peel, and sugar, 
and half a pint of red wine : half an hour 
will bake it. 



MARROW PUDDING. 

Boil cinnamon and lemon-peel for an 
hour in a pint of milk; strain it into a bason, 
and put it to cool ; beat up the yolks of 
six eggs with half the whites ; then add 
the milk that you strained, with a little 
brandy and nutmeg ; put puff-paste round 
the rim of the dish you intend to bake it 
in ; butter the bottom ; cut the crumb of 
three French rolls into slices, and lay them 
at the bottom of the dish ; then cut mar- 



ROYAL COOK. 



199 



row in thin slices, lay them at the bottom 
of the dish, and lay it on the rolls ; sprinkle 
a few currants over the marrow ; then lay 
another layer of bread, marrow, and cur- 
rants ; and repeat it till the dish is full ; 
about a quarter of an hour before you 
put it into the oven pour some of the cus- 
tard over it, and the remainder as you put 
it in : it will take about half an hour. 



QUINCE PUDDING. 

Scald your quinces tender, pare them 
thin, scrape off the pulp, mix with sugar, 
very sweet, and add a little ginger and 
cinnamon ; to a pint of cream you must 
put two or three yolks of eggs, and stir it 
into your quinces till they are of a good 
thickness : butter your dish, pour it in, and 
bake it. 



SAGO PUDDING. 

Boil four ounces of sago in water for a 
few minutes, strain it* off, put it into about 
a quart of milk, and boil it until tender ; 



200 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



boil lemon-peel and cinnamon in a little 
milk, and strain it through the sago ; put 
the whole into a bason ; break eight eggs, 
mix well together, and sweeten with moist 
sugar ; add a glass of brandy, and nutmeg ; 
put puff-paste round the rim of the dish, 
and butter the bottom : three quarters of 
an hour will bake it. 



T ARTS. 



CHERKY: 

Make a good crust ; lay a little of it 
round the sides of the dish, and strew a 
little sugar at the bottom ; then lay in 
your fruit and sugar at the top ; put on 
your lid, and bake it in a slack oven : cur- 
rants mixed with the cherries will be a con- 
siderable improvement. A plumb or goose- 
berry tart may be made in the same man- 
ner. 



royal cook. 



201 



TART DE MOI. 

Put puff-paste round the dish, then a 
layei of biscuits, a layer of butter and mar- 
row, another of all sorts of sweetmeats, and 
so on, till the dish is full ; boil a quart of 
ci earn, thicken it with eggs, put in a spoon- 
ful of orange-flour-water, sweeten with 
sugar, pour it over the whole, and bake it 
half an hour. 



ANGELICA TARTS. 

Pare and core golden pippins or non- 
pareils ; take the stalks of angelica peel, 
and cut them into small pieces ; apples and 
angelica, of each an equal quantity ; boil 
the apples in water enough to cover them, 
with lemon-peel and fine sugar ; do them 
gently till they become a thin syrup, then 
strain it off ; put it on the fire with the 
angelica in it, and let it boil ten minutes : 
make a puff-paste ; lay it at the bottom of 
the tin ; then the layer of apples, and the 
layer of angelica, till full ; pour in some 
syrup, put on the lid, and put it in a very 
moderate oven. 

K 5 



202 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



CHOCOLATE TART. 

Rasp a quarter of a pound of chocolate 
and a stick of cinnamon ; add to them, 
fresh lemon-peel grated, a little salt, and 
sugar ; take two spoonfuls of fine flour, and 
the yolks of six eggs, well beaten and 
mixed with milk ; put all this into a stew- 
pan, and let them be a little time over the 
fire ; then take it off ; put in lemon-peel, 
cut small, and let it stand until cold : beat 
up enough of the whites of eggs to cover 
it, and put it into puff-paste : when baked, 
sift sugar over, and glaze it with a sala- 
mander. 



ORANGE TART. 

Grate a little of the outside of a Seville 
orange, squeeze the juice into a dish, put 
the peel into water, and change it often, 
for four daysj then put them into a sauce- 
pan ol boiling water on the fire ; change 
the water twice, to take out the bitterness ; 
and, when tender, wipe, and beat them 
fine in a mortar: boil their weight in 



ROYAL COOK. 



203 



double-refined sugar into a syrup, and skim 
it ; then put in the pulp, and boil all toge- 
ther till clear : when cold, put it into the 
tarts, squeeze in the juice, and bake them 
in a quick oven. Conserve of oranges 
makes good tarts. 



RASPBERRY TARTS AND CREAM. 

Roll out thin puff-paste, and lay it in 
a patty-pan ; put in raspberries, and strew 
fine sugar over them : put on a lid, and, 
when baked, cut it open, and put in half a 
pint of cream, the yolks of two eggs, well 
beaten, and a little sugar. 



RHUBARB TART. 

Cut the stalks in lengths of four inches, 
and take off the thin skin : if you have a 
hot hearth, lay them in a dish ; put over a 
thin syrup of sugar and water ; cover with 
another dish, and let it simmer very slowly 
for one hour ; — or do them in a block-tin 
saucepan. When cold, make them into tarts. 



204 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



SWEET PATES. 

Chop the meat of a boiled calf’s foot, 
two apples, an ounce of candied orange 
and lemon-peel, some fresh lemon-peel, and 
juice ; mix them with a nutmeg grated, 
the yolk of an egg, a spoonful of brandy, 
and four ounces of currants, washed and 
dried : bake them in small patty-pans. 



PATES LIKE MINCE PIES. 

Chof the kidney and fat of cold veal, 
apples, orange and lemon-peel candied, 
fresh currants, a little white wine, two or 
three cloves, a little brandy, and a bit of 
sugar : bake them in the same manner as 
sweet pates. 



VEAL PATES. 

Mince veal that is rather under-done, 
with parsley, lemon-peel, a little nutmeg, 
and salt; add a little cream, and gravy 
just sufficient to moisten the meat ; if you 
have ham, scrape a little, and add to it ; 



ROYAL COOK. 



205 



do not warm it till the pates are baked, 
and observe to put a square bit of bread 
into each, to prevent the paste from rising 
into cake. 



PUFFS. 



ALMOND. 

Blanch two ounces of sweet almonds, 
and beat them fine, with orange-flour- 
water; whisk the whites of three eggs to 
a froth, strew in sifted sugar, mix the al- 
monds with the sugar and eggs, and add 
sugar till as thick as paste : lay it in cakes, 
and bake it on paper in a cool oven. 



CHOCOLATE. 

Beat and sift half a pound of double- 
refined sugar ; scrape into it an ounce of 
chocolate very fine, and mix them toge- 
ther ; beat the white of an egg to a high 



206 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



froth, and strew into the sugar and choco- 
late ; beat it till as stiff as paste ; then 
sugar the paper, drop them on the size of a 
sixpence, and bake them in a slow oven. 



CURD. 

Mix a little rennet in a quart of new 
milk ; when the curd comes, and is broken, 
put it into a coarse cloth to drain : rub the 
curd through a hair-sieve with a spoon, 
and ten ounces of grated Savoy biscuit, 
three ounces of butter, half a grated nut- 
meg, the grated rind of a lemon, a table- 
spoonful of white wine, and sugar to your 
taste : rub the cups with butter, rather 
more than half fill them, and bake them 
forty minutes in a quick oven. 



LEMON. 

Bruise a pound of double-refined sugar, 
and sift it through a fine sieve ; put it into 
a bowl, with the juice of two lemons, and 
mix them together ; beat the white of an 



ROYAL COOK. 



207 



egg to a very high froth, put it into your 
bowl ; put in three eggs, with two rinds of 
lemon grated : mix it well up, and throw 
sugar on your paper ; drop on the puffs in 
small drops, and bake them in a moderately 
heated oven. 



ORANGE. 

Pare off the rinds from Seville oranges, 
and then rub them with ^lt ; let them lie 
four and twenty hours in water ; boil them 
in four changes of water ; make the first 
salt ; drain, and beat them to a pulp ; 
bruise in the pieces of all that you have 
pared : make it very sweet with loaf-sugar, 
and boil it till thick ; let it stand till cold, 
and then put it into the paste. 



SUGAR. 

Beat up the whites of ten eggs till they 
rise to a high froth ; then put them into a 
marble mortar, with as much double-re- 
fined sugar as will make it thick ; rub it 
well round the mortar, and put in a few 



208 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



carra way-seeds ; take a sheet of wafers, 
and lay it on as broad as a sixpence, and 
as high as you can ; put them into a mode- 
rately heated oven fora quarter of an hour, 
and they will look quite white. 



PANCAKES. 

Beat up six eggs, leaving out half the 
whites, and stir them into a quart of milk ; 
mix your flour first with a little of the 
milk, add the rest by degrees ; put in two 
spoonfuls of beaten ginger, a glass of brandy, 
and a little salt ; put a piece of butter into 
your pan, then pour in a ladleful of batter, 
which will make a pancake ; move the pan 
round, that the batter may spread all over 
it : shake the pan ; and when you think 
one side is done enough, turn it ; and when 
the other is done, lay it on a dish before 
the fire, and serve it as quick as possible. 



CREAM PANCAKES. 

Mix the yolks of two eggs with half a 
pint of cream, two ounces of sugar, beaten 



ROYAL COOK. 



209 



cinnamon and mace, and nutmeg : rub 
your pan with lard, and fry them as thin 
as possible : grate fine sugar over them. 



RICE PANCAKES. 

Boil half a pound of rice to a jelly in a 
small quantity of water ; when cold, mix 
it with a pint of cream, eight eggs, salt, 
and nutmeg, stirring a quarter of a pound 
of butter just warmed ; add as much flour 
as will make the batter thick enough : fry 
them in as little lard as possible. 



PINK COLOURED PANCAKES. 

Boil beat-root till tender, and then beat 
it fine in a mortar; add the yolks of four 
eggs, two spoonfuls of flour, and three or 
four of cream ; sweeten it, and grate in 
half a nutmeg : add a glass of brandy : 
mix all well together, and fry your pan- 
cakes in butter : garnish them with green 
sweetmeats. 



210 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



FRITTERS. 



CUSTARD FRITTERS. 

Beat up the yolks of eight eggs, one 
spoonful of flour, half a nutmeg grated, 
salt, and a glass of brandy ; put a pint of 
cream ; sweeten, and bake it in a small 
dish : when cold, cut it into quarters, and 
dip them in batter made of half a pint of 
cream, a quarter of a pint of milk, four 
eggs, a little flour, and a little ginger 
grated : fry them ; and, when done, strew 
oyAr them prated siurar. 



WHITE FRITTERS. 

Wash two ounces of rice, dried before 
the fire ; beat it very fine in a mortar, and 
sift it through a lawn-sieve ; put it into a 
saucepan ; when thoroughly moistened w r ith 
milk, add to it another pint ; set it over a 
stove or a slow fire, and keep it moving; put 
in ginger and candied lemon-peel grated ; 



ROYAL COOK. 



211 



keep it over the fire till of the thickness of 
fine paste ; when cold, spread it out with a 
rolling-pin ; cut it into little pieces, and 
take care they do not stick to each other ; 
flour your hands, roll up the fritters hand- 
somely, and fry them : when done, strew 
on them sugar, and pour orange-flour-water 
over them. 



HASTY FRITTERS. 

Heat some butter in a stewpan ; then 
take half a pint of ale, and stir it into it by 
degrees ; add a little flour, and a few cur- 
rants, or chopped apples; beat them up, 
and drop a large spoonful at a time all over 
the pan, but be careful they do not stick 
together ; turn them with an egg slice ; 
and, when brown, lay them on a dish ; 
strew sugar over, and serve them hot. 



ROYAL FRITTERS. 

Put a quart of new milk into a sauce- 
pan ; and, when it begins to boil, pour in a 
pint of white wine ; take it off, and let 



212 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



it stand five or six minutes; skim the 
curd off, and put it into a bason ; mix it 
well up with six eggs, and season it with 
nutmeg ; beat it with a whisk, and add 
flour sufficient to give it the thickness of 
batter ; add some sugar, and fry them 
quick. 



PIES AND PASTRY. 



PIGEON PIE, IN A DISH. 

DHAV/ fa the legs of six pigeons | season 
them with pepper, salt, chopped shalots, 
mushrooms, and parsley, all mixed ; lay 
beef-steaks at the bottom of the dish ; put 
a little stock between each layer of beef- 
steaks ; (otherwise the beef-steaks are apt 
to stick together, when done) ; lay the 
pigeons on the beef-steaks ; put in eight 
hard yolks of eggs, and cover the pie with 
puff-paste : it will take an hour to bake : 
when done, add about half a pint of good 
stock and coulis, mixed. 



ROYAL COOK. 



213 



PATE A LA FRANCOISE. 

Raise a pie about three inches high ; 
lay the bottom with slices of veal, then a 
few mushrooms, then a few slices of ham, 
a chicken cut up, a few more mushrooms, 
and a sweetbread cut in slices ; season it 
with pepper, salt, and sweet herbs ; cover 
it in, and put it in the oven : it will take 
about two hours in a slack oven : when 
done, pour off the fat, and put coulis, and 
six yolks of eggs boiled hard. 



AMIENS PIE. 

Raise a pie to match the ham pie ; 
bone two ducks, and fill them with farce ; 
put them in a stewpan, with a little stock ; 
cover them with bacon, and set them on a 
slow stove to simmer for an hour ; then 
put them to cool in the liquor they were 
done in ; when cold, put them in the pie, 
first laying a few slices of veal at the bot- 
tom, and farce on the veal; put the ducks in, 
and the liquor, fat, and all that they were 
done in ; cover them all over with bacon ; 
I 



214 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



the pie will take two hours’ baking ; put 
the bones and giblets of the ducks, and any 
other giblets that are at hand, into a stew- 
pan, with a faggot, a few blades of mace, 
a pint of sherry, a pint of stock, and about 
a dozen of shalots ; set them on a stove to 
boil very slow for two hours ; then strain 
it off, and skim the fat from it ; put a bit 
of butter into a stewpan ; when melted, 
put flour to dry up the butter, then the 
liquor which the bones, &:c. were boiled in ; 
let it boil a few minutes, strain it through 
a tammy-sieve, and put it in the pie. 

N. B. Put about one pound of truffles 
in the pie before it goes into the oven ; the 
truffles should be peeled, but not boiled. 



A GOOSE AND TURKEY PIE. 

Bone two geese and two turkeys ; sea- 
son the inside with mixed pepper and salt, 
and a little fine spice ; put them by for 
three days, and then draw the geese one 
within the other : put some good farce in 
the middle, and about six raw truffles, first 



ROYAL COOK. 



215 



being peeled ; then tie the geese into what 
shape you think proper ; do the turkeys 
the same, and put farce in the turkeys, and 
truffles, and about three pounds of the 
prime part of Westphalia ham that has 
been braised for about two hours ; then 
make the turkey the same shape as the 
geese ; put about one pint of good stock 
into a braising-pan (or any thing of that 
kind) that will barely hold them, as by 
that means they will keep their shape ; 
put them on a slow stove to simmer gently 
for half an hour, by way of setting them ; 
put them to cool in the pan they are done 
in ; while they are cooling, raise the pie ; 
let them be thoroughly cold before they 
are put in the pie ; lay either slices of a 
fillet of veal, or rump-steaks, at the bottom 
of the pie ; then put in a layer of farce, 
and then the turkeys and geese ; put farce 
between them, and all round the sides of 
the pie, and about two pounds of raw 
truffles, first being peeled, and cover them 
with sheets of bacon ; then cover the pie 
with paste, and ornament it according to 
fancy : observe to ornament it strong ; for, 

7 



216 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



if done fine, it will not look well, by being 
so long in the oven ; it should not be put 
in the oven the same evening that it is 
made, but next morning, or evening : the 
best oven for it, is just when the bread is 
drawn out : leave it in about eight hours ; 
when you take it out of the oven, be care- 
ful that you do not spill any fat that rises 
to the top, as that soaks into the geese and 
turkeys, and makes them mellow : this pie 
will take four and twenty hours to get cold, 
therefore you must prepare accordingly. 
It ought to be begun four days before the 
day on which it is wanted. Before the 
pie is sent up to the table there should be 
chopped aspic put in it, and the sheets of 
bacon taken off. This is the general rule, 
but not the rule that I either recommend 
or follow ; for this reason : by taking the 
bacon off the geese, you let the air into the 
pie, and then the aspic will get sour and 
mouldy in a few days ; therefore I recom- 
mend the following method : — put the 
bones of the turkeys and geese, two old 
fowls, and two pounds of lean ham, into a 
proper sized stewpan, with twelve onions. 



royal cook. 



217 



six heads of celery, a little parsley, and 
other sweet herbs ; put one pint of water 
to them, and put the stewpan on a stove 
to simmer very slowly for two hours, but 
be sure that it does not catch at the bot- 
tom ; fill it up with stock, and let it boil 
very slow for three hours ; then strain it off, 
fill the stewpan again with water, and let 
it boil all the evening ; the liquor that was 
first strained off put into a stewpan, (first 
skimming the fat off), to reduce to the 
quantity that you think will fill up the pie 
after it is baked, and should be put in 
about half an hour after it is taken out of 
the oven, just as much as will barely cover 
the bacon ; this will make the pie eat far 
better. 

N. B. Small pies for ball-suppers should 
have the aspic put over them before they 
are sent to table ; in every other respect, 
all cold pies should be made in this man- 
ner, only varying as to different meats, 
&c. A tin case has been invented for 
large pies, which is made use of in the 
following manner : — make paste the same 
as for a raised pie, brush the inside of the 

L 



218 



THE IMPERIAL ANb 



mould with egg, (be sure to put plenty on), 
roll out the paste about two inches larger 
than the bottoms, that it may turn up on 
the sides ; then roll out paste to cover th£ 
inside ; let it turn over about an inch ; roll 
pieces of paste two inches larger than the 
bottom, egg four sheets of large kitchen- 
paper, lay the paste on them, put plenty of 
egg on the paste, and put on the tin case ; 
the egg will make it stick to the tin ; then 
roll paste out for the sides, roll it in two 
pieces, egg the sides, and put the paste on ; 
rub it smooth with the palm of your hand, 
to hinder it from gathering wind, which, if 
it does, the paste will blister and break 
when a few days baked ; the paste that 
goes round the sides should be about two 
inches broader than the side of the pie, so 
as to lay over the top and fasten to the 
bottom paste, so as to make it a proper 
thickness, to enable you to pinch the bot- 
tom, and the same at the top : when the 
case is properly covered, then fill the pie as 
before directed ; cover it in, and ornament 
it : as to size and shape, that must depend 
on those who are to make or order the pie : 



ROYAL COOK. 



219 



the tin cases are made by Mr. Bailis, in 
Cockspur-street, Charing- cross, who will 
give a proper direction how to use them, 
by lining it with paper, to give a clear idea 
to those who may not comprehend what I 
have said upon this subject. By using 
those tins, you are sure of all the liquor 
remaining in the pie : for instance ; make 
a large pie, without a tin case ; an accident 
may happen to it, so as to crack in the 
oven, which lets the gravy and goodness 
out, and of course the true flavour of the 
pie is lost, and the cook blamed by his 
employer for what he could not avoid ; for 
at times the flour will not stand the oven 
without cracking ; and it certainly does 
.not take half the flour, which is a great 
consideration : the Hn case will last a num- 
ber of years. There is another advantage, 
which is, there is no occasion to set the 
meat ; for if the meat is not set, when the 
crust is raised it will burst the pie, and of 
course let out all the essence of the inside, 
which cannot be retrieved without double 
expense. 



220 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A CHRISTMAS PIE. 

It is made in the same manner as the 
last, with the addition of partridges, hares, 
and pheasants, all boned : as to the num- 
ber, it depends on the size which the pie 
is to be. 



A COLD PARTRIDGE PIE. 

Bone partridges, the number according 
to the size the pie is wanted ; make some 
good farce, and fill the partridges with it : 
put a whole raw truffle in each partridge, 
(let the truffle be peeled) ; raise the pie ; 
put a few slices of veal in the bottom of it, 
and a thick layer of farce ; then the par- 
tridges, and four raw truffles to each par- 
tridge ; then cover the partridges and truffles 
over with sheets of bacon ; cover the pie 
in, and finish it ; it will take four hours’ 
baking ; cut two pounds of lean ham (if 
eight partridges are in the pie) in very thin 
slices, put it in a stewpan, with the bones 
and giblets of the partridges, and any other 
loose giblets that are at hand, an old fowl, a 



ROYAL COOK. 



221 



small quantity of parsley, a little mace,, 
and about twenty-four shalots ; put about 
half a pint of stock ; set the stcwpan on a 
stove to draw down for half an hour, and 
then put three quarts of good stock ; let it 
boil for two hours, then strain it off, and 
reduce the liquid to one quart, or until it 
nearly becomes a glaze ; then put one pint 
of sherry wine to it, and put it away until 
the pie is baked ; when the pie has been 
out of the oven for half an hour, boil what 
was strained from the bones, &c. of the 
partridges, and put it to the pie; let it 
stand for twenty-four hours before it is cut. 

N. B. Do not take any of the fat from 
the pie, for that is what preserves it. A 
pie made in this manner will be fit for eat- 
ing three months after it is cut ; in short, 
it cannot spoil in any reasonable time ; all 
cold pies are made in this manner : either 
poultry or game that is put in a raised 
crust, and intended not to be eaten until 
cold, should be boned, and the liquid that 
is to fill up the 'pie made from the bones. 



5222 THE IMPERIAL AND 



PUFF-PASTE. 

Take three quarters of a pound of flour, 
and an egg ; wet it with water, but be 
careful not to put too much water at first ; 
mix it up rather stiff, then work it in well, 
with the heel of your hand, until it becomes 
pliable, so that it will draw in strings ; 
then take a pound of butter, and work it 
together until it becomes tough ; roll the 
paste out rather thick, put all the butter in 
at. once, and fold the paste quite even ; then 
roll it out again, and fold it up in regular 
folds ; repeat this three times, then roll it 
out for use ; be careful to let it all be of a 
thickness, otherwise it will not bake up- 
right, but fall aside in the oven ; if for 
pates, it should be nearly a quarter of an 
inch ; cut out with cutters, according to 
your own fancy ; put them on a baking 
sheet ; brush them over with a small paste 
brush ; dip it in the yolk of an egg and a 
little water ; be careful not to let the egg 
touch the sides ; then take a cutter three 
sizes smaller than whatyou cut out the pates 
with, and cut them in the middle about 



ROYAL COOK. 



228 



half through ; put them in a quick oven 
immediately ; be particularly attentive to 
the oven, as they will not take many mi- 
nutes in baking; if the oven is too quick,, 
cover them with paper, to keep them from 
being too highly coloured ; when done, 
take off the tops, and scoop out the soft 
paste from the inside, and put them on 
white kitchen-paper, to soak the butter 
from them ; they should not be filled many 
minutes before they are wanted ; this kind 
of paste is used for all kinds of tartlets, and 
what is called small pastry, meat-pies 
made in dishes, vole vents, pates, goode- 
veaux, &c. 

N. B. All meat-pies should be egged. 



ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE PUFF-PASTE, 

PARTICULARLY IX HOT WEATHER. 

Cut the butter in three equal pieces, 
have flour of equal weight, roll the butter 
in, and make as much stick to it as you 
can ; wet the remainder with water and 
egg, the same as before ; when well worked. 



224 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



roll the paste out, and put one third of the 
butter in ; fold it up, dust it with flour, 
and roll it out ; then put half the butter 
that is left, fold it up, and roll it out again ; 
then put in the remainder of the butter, 
fold it up, and put it between two dishes, 
and leave it for half an hour, or until 
wanted ; then roll it out, and fold it up ; 
then roll it out for use. 



TART PASTE, COMMONLY CALLED 
SHORT PASTE. 

To one pound of flour rub in a quarter 
of a pound of butter, wet it with water and 
two eggs, work it up to a proper stiffness, 
and roll it out for use. 

N. B. There should be about two table 
spoonfuls of sugar to it, when it is for tarts, 
or any thing sweet. This is the proper 
paste for meat-puddings, dumplings, &c. 
only remember to make it without sugar. 



ROYAL COOK. 



225 



HOT PASTE FOR RAISED PIES. 

To one quart of water put two ounces 
of butter ; set it on the fire to boil ; take 
what flour you think is requisite, break 
two eggs into it, and stir the butter and 
water with a spoon, so as to mix the egg 
with liquid ; then work it up well ; it 
should be worked at least fifteen minutes, 
and made quite stiff ; then put it in a stew- 
pan before the fire to sweat for half an 
hour ; then raise your pie to any shape 
you please ; it is the better way to raise 
your pie and finish it before baking the 
day before you want it, as it will stand the 
oven better, particularly if it is a large one ; 
but as for small ones, or causes, they may 
be made and baked directly : as for gar- 
nishing, your own fancy must direct you. 



ALMOND PASTE FOR SECOND COURSE 
DISHES. 

Take a pound of sweet, and four ounces 
of bitter, almonds ; blanch them, and make 
them as dry as you can ; put them into a 

L 5 



226 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



mortar, and pound them well ; beat up the 
whites of three eggs, and wet the almonds 
with it by a little at a time ; when pounded 
enough, rub it through a tammy-sieve $ 
then get a small preserving-pan, set it over 
a stove (not very fierce), then put the al- 
monds in the pan, stir in a pound of very 
fine sifted treble-refined sugar, or as much 
as will bring it to a paste consistence ; take 
it out of the preserving-pan, and put it be- 
tween two plates to sweat ; when cold, 
make it into what shapes you think pro- 
per. There are shells of different sorts for 
almond paste. Make some into cups, like 
coffee-cups, and cream jugs, &c. 



WOODCOCK PIE COLD. 

Pass the woodcocks off in a little butter 
and good stock, raise a pie, put some farce 
in the bottom, and a few slices of veal from 
the fillet, and upon that some more farce, 
and then the woodcocks ; season them with 
chopped parsley, shalots, mushrooms chop- 
ped very fine, pepper, and salt, a very little 

1 



ROYAL COOK. 



227 



fine spice and Cayenne pepper ; cover the 
woodcocks over with farce, then with sheets 
.of bacon ; finish the pie, and put it into the- 
oven ; it will take three hours to bake ; 
when done, have some stock of the very 
best sort, and about a pint of sherry to a; 
pie that contains twelve woodcocks, and 
three parts stock to one of wine ; put it in •. 
the pie while hot ; be careful not to let any 
of the fat spill over the sides of the pie, for • 
this reason ; it soaks in to the woodcocks 
and makes them mellow, and helps the 
flavour. 

N. B. Snipes will answer the same as 
woodcocks, only they will take less doing, . 
of course. 



MINCE PIES. 

Seven pounds of currants, rubbed and' 
picked very clean, and three pounds and a- 
half of beef suet, chopped very fine, three- 
pounds and a half of the lean of a sirloin of ' 
beef minced raw, veiy fine, three pounds * 
and a half of apples, chopped very fine, , 
(they should be the lemon pippin), half a a 



528 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



pound of citron, cut in very small pieces, 
half a pound of lemon-peel, half a pound of 
orange-peel, cut like the citron, two pounds 
of fine moist sugar, one ounce of fine spice, 
(such as cloves, mace, nutmegs, and cinna- 
mon, all pounded together and sifted), the 
rind of four lemons, and four Seville oranges ; 
all these to be rubbed together until well 
mixed ; then put it into a deep pan ; put 
over it one bottle of brandy, one of white 
wine (of the sherry kind), the juice of the 
lemons and oranges that have been grated ; 
mix the wine and brandy together in a 
bason, and lemon and orange juice ; pour 
half over, and press it down tight with 
your hand ; then add the other half, and 
let it remain at the top, to soak in by de- 
grees ; cover it up ; it should be made six 
weeks before it is w r anted ; the pans are 
sheeted with puff-paste, and covered with 
the same: about ten minutes will bake 
them. 






ROYAL COOK 



229 



SMALL MUTTON PIES. 

Raise as many small pies as the dish 
will hold ; cut the fillet of a neck of mutton, 
and some fat ; take all the skin and sinews 
from it, and mince it very fine with your 
knife, (not with the chopping knife) ; put 
about a spoonful of stock into a stewpan 
with the mutton, mix a little chopped 
shalot, mushrooms, parsley, and a very 
little pepper and salt ; add it to the meat, 
and set it on the fire for a few minutes, 
stirring it all the while ; take it off to cool ; 
then fill the pies ; they will take about half 
an hour baking ; with the meat that is 
left, put as much coulis and stock as you 
think will fill the pies up ; when they are 
baked, cut the tops off, and fill them with 
it ; dish them on a napkin. 

N. B. All pastry should be dished on 
napkins. 



A WOODCOCK PIE. 

Raise a pie according to the size of the 
dish that it is to go in ; lay a few slices of 
veal in the bottom then a layer of force- 



230 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



meat, and then put in six woodcocks ; 
season them with fine herbs and chopped 
mushrooms ; put in a pound of raw truffles, 
pared, and cut in thick slices ; cover the 
woodcocks over with sheets of bacon ; cover 
the pie, and garnish according to fancy : it 
will take two hours and a half to bake : 
when done, cut the top off, pour off' the fat, 
and put in some coulis. 



A MUTTON AND POTATOE PIE IN A 
RAISED CRUST. 

Raise a pie about three inches high, cut 

a neck of mutton into cutlets, butter a 

♦ 

souties-pan, sprinkle it over with mixed 
pepper and salt, chopped mushrooms, pars- 
ley, and chopped shalots ; lay the cutlets 
on them, and sprinkle them over; put 
them on a stove about two minutes, just to 
set them ; then turn them, and put them 
to cool ; when cold, lay the cutlets round 
the sides of the pie in the same manner as 
you would round a dish ; scoop potatoes 
with a turnip scoop, and put them in the 



ROYAL COOK. 



231 



middle ; scrape off the herbs from the 
souties-pan, and put them in the pie ; cover 
it in, and garnish as fancy directs : it will 
take two hours’ baking in what is called a 
soaking oven : when done, cut the top off, 
and pour off the fat again, but take care 
none of the gravy comes out, as that is 
what gives it the real flavour ; pour a little 
good coulis in, and dish it on a napkin. 

N. B. A neck of mutton should be boned 
before it is cut up. 



A PATE GOODEVEAU. 

Raise a small pie about three inches 
high ; put force-meat round the sides ; cut 
a sweetbread in slices, a few fat livers, and 
five or six truffles that have not been 
braised, or raw ; cut them in slices, and 
cover the pie in ; when done, pour in some 
good coulis, and a glass of Madeira wine. 

N. B. Boil the coulis and wine together 
before it is put in the pie. 



232 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



RISOLES. 

Mince any kind of white meat, such as 
fowl, turkey, or veal sweetbreads ; put a 
little beshemell in a stewpan, make it hot, 
then put in the mince, season with pepper 
and salt, a drop or two of garlick vinegar, 
the juice of half a lemon, and a little 
pounded sugar ; put it in a dish to cool ; 
when quite cold, roll it up, either round or 
long ; beat up two eggs in a bason, dip the 
risoles in them, and roil them in bread 
crumbs ; they should be done twice over ; 
have some clear lard, made quite hot ; (the 
lard is not hot enough for frying either 
risoles or fish, until it stops boiling) ; then 
put in the risoles ; have a sieve by the 
stove where you are frying, to put them on 
as soon as done, which will not be many 
minutes; pick some parsley, and dry it 
before the fire ; put it in a proper cullender, 
and set the cullender in the lard ; about 
one minute will be sufficient to crisp it: 
lay the risoles round the dish, and parsley 
in the middle. 



ROYAL COOK. 



233 



A TIMBALL OF MACCARONI AND 
CHICKEN. 

Boil the maccaroni in broth until ten- 
der, then put some beshemell and grated 
cheese, and a chicken cut up as for a fri- 
cassee ; (a chicken that has been left from 
dinner the day before will do) ; put it to 
the maccaroni, and make it hot, then put 
it to cool ; butter the mould that is in- 
tended for the timball, and put in some 
bread crumbs, or vermicelli ; shake it about ; 
what does not stick to the mould turn out ; 
then sheet it with trimmings of puff-paste 
that has a little flour worked in it ; when 
the maccaroni and chicken is cold, put it in 
the oven : one hour will bake it : the oven 
should not be over hot : when done, turn 
it out, cut the top out, and put a little 
beshemell, and a little in the dish round 
the timball. 



RAISED PIE, WITH A NEAT’S TONGUE. 

Raise a pie as nearly to the shape of a 
tongue as you can, lay some good force- 



£34 



THE IMPERIAL A 



meat (first made hot) at the bottom, cut the 
tongue that has been boiled into thin slices, 
and the root the same ; lay a slice of tongue 
and a slice of the root round the pie, and 
put force-meat in the middle ; cover over 
the tongue, &c. with sheets of bacon ; 
cover the pie in, and ornament it ; it will 
take an hour or better to bake : the oven 
should not be very quick : when done cut 
the top off, pour the fat off, and put in 
some coulis : put a glass of Madeira in the 
coulis : dish it on a napkin. 



A TRUFFLE PIE, HOT. 

Raise a pie according to the size of the 
dish in length and in breadth, but not more 
than three inches deep ; make a good 
truffle farce, and fill the pie with it ; then 
lay in a pound of truffles that have been 
braised and peeled ; cover the truffles with 
sheets of fat bacon ; then cover the pie, 
and ornament it as you think proper ; put 
it into rather a slow' oven : half an hour 
will bake it : when done, cut the top off. 



ROYAL COOK. 



235 



and take the fat ham away ; pour a glass 
of Madeira wine in ; put the top on the pie 
again, and send it up to table quite hot. 

N. B. This is generally sent up as a 
remove for a second course roast. 



RAISED PIGEON PIE. 

Raise a pie, and prepare six pigeons 
the same as for a compote ; draw the legs 
of six pigeons in, (in the same manner as 
chickens for boiling), singe them, and fill 
them with force-meat, and put a small raw- 
truffle in each pigeon ; put the necks and 
gizzards into a stewpan, and any other 
giblets that are at hand, about a quarter of 
a pound of lean ham, a few onions, a few 
blades of mace, a little parsley, two or 
three bay leaves, half a pint of sherry, and 
a pint of stock ; put beef steaks at the 
bottom of the pie, and the pigeons on the 
steaks ; cover the pie in, and ornament it ; 
(all raised pies should be made the day 
before, but not baked) : it will take two 
hours to bake it : when done, take the top 



236 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



off, and put in six hard yolks of eggs, and 
fill it up with coulis. 



LAMB PIE, IN A DISH. 

Cut up a loin of lamb into chops, season 
them with pepper, salt, chopped shalot, 
parsley, and chopped mushrooms ; lay them 
in the dish ; put a little stock between each 
layer of chops, put hard eggs, and cover it 
with puff-paste ; it will take one hour to 
bake : when done, put a little stock and 
coulis mixed. 



VENISON PASTY. 

Bone, and well season with pepper and 
salt, a neck and breast of venison ; put 
them into a pan, with the best part of 
a neck of mutton sliced, and lay it on 
them : pour in a glass of red wine ; put 
the coarse paste over ; bake it two hours, 
lay the venison in a dish, pour the gravy 
over, and put half a pound of butter over 
it ; lay a good puff-paste round the edge of 
the dish ; roll out the lid, which must be a 



ROYAL COOK. 



237 



little thicker than that on the edge, and 
lay it on ; then roll out another lid pretty 
thin, cut it into whatever form you please, 
and lay it on the other. It will keep in 
the pot it was baked in eight or ten days ; 
but the crust must be kept on, that the air 
may not get in it. 



VENISON POTTED. 

Bone a side of venison, take off all the 
sinews, and cut it in square collars of what 
size you please ; lard it with fat bacon, as 
big as the top of your finger, and three or 
four inches long : season with pepper, salt, 
cloves, and nutmeg ; roll up, and tie close 
with coarse tape : put them into deep pots, 
with seasoning at the bottoms, fresh butter, 
and three or four bay leaves ; put the rest 
of the seasoning and butter on the top, and 
over that beef suet, finely shred and beaten : 
cover up your pots with coarse paste, and 
bake them for four or five hours ; then 
take them out of the oven, and let them 
stand a little ; teke out your venison, and 



238 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



drain it from your gravy ; add more butter 
to the fat, and set it over a slow fire, to 
clarify ; then take it off, let it stand a little, 
and skim it ; have pots ready for each 
collar ; put a little seasoning, and some of 
your clarified butter, at the bottom : then 
put in your venison, fill your pot with 
clarified butter, and let your butter be an 
inch above your meat : when thoroughly 
cold, tie it doAvn with double paper, and 
lay a till on the top. It will keep several 
months. When you want a pot, put it for 
a minute into boiling water, and it will 
come out whole ; let it stand till cold, stick 
bay leaves round, and a sprig at the top. 



FINE PATES. 

Slice any quantity of either turkey, 
house-lamb, or chicken, with an equal quan- 
tity of the fat of lamb, a loin of veal, or the 
inside of a sirloin of beef, parsley, and 
lemon-peel, shred ; pound all fine in a mor- 
tar, and season with salt and white pepper ; 
make a fine puff-paste, roll it out in thin 



ROYAL COOK. 



239 



square sheets, and put the meat in the 
middle ; cover the pates, close them, cut 
the paste even, brush them over with yolks 
of egg s, and bake them twenty minutes in 
a quick oven : have ready a little white 
gravy ; season with pepper, salt, and a 
shalot ; thicken it with cream or butter : 
when done, cut the whole in the top, and 
pour in some gravy. 



PUFFS, WITH CHICKEN. 

Chop the breast of a fowl, some lean 
ham, half an anchovy, add a small quantity 
of parsley; lemon-peel, and shalots cut very 
fine, with a little Cayenne, and pounded 
mace ; put them into a stewpan, with two 
spoonfuls of bpshemell ; set them over a 
nre for five minutes ; put them on a plate, 
and, when cold, roll out some puff-paste, 
then cut it into square pieces, put some of 
the mixture on them, double the paste, 
run a gigger iron round, to make them in 
the form of puffs ; fry them in boiling lard, 
and serve them up with fried parsley under. 



240 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



RICH VEAL PIE. 

Cut a loin of veal into steaks ; season 
with salt, nutmeg, and beaten mace ; lay 
the meat in your dish, with sweetbreads ; 
season it, and add the yolks of six hard 
eggs, a pint of oysters, and half a pint of 
stock ; lay good puff-paste round your dish, 
half an inch thick, and cover it with the 
same ; bake it an hour and a quarter in a 
quick oven : before you serve it, take off 
the lid, cut it into eight or ten pieces, and 
stick them round the inside of the rim of 
the dish; cover the meat with slices of 
lemon, and send it hot to table. 



VEAL OR LAMB PIE A HAUT GOUT. 

Cut the meat into small pieces, and 
season with pepper, salt, cloves, mace, and 
nutmeg, beaten fine: make a puff-paste, 
lay it into the dish, then put in your meat, 
and strew on it some stoned raisins and 
currants, clean washed and picked, and 
some sugar ; lay on force-meat balls, made 



"ROYAL COOK. 



241 



sweet ; and if in the summer, some arti- 
choke bottoms ; but if in winter, scalded 
grapes ; add to this Spanish potatoes 
boiled, and cut into pieces, candied citron, 
orange, or lemon-peel, and three or four 
blades of mace ; put butter on the top : 
close up your pie, and bake it : have ready 
against it is done, the yolks of three eggs, 
mixed with a pint of wine ; stir them well 
together over the fire one way till it is 
thick ; take it off, put a bit of sugar, and 
squeeze in the juice of a lemon ; raise the 
lid of the pie, put this hot into it, close it 
up again, and send it to table. 



CALVES’ FEET PIE. 

Boil the feet in three quarts of water, 
with three or four blades of mace, till re- 
duced to a pint and a half; take out the 
feet, strain the liquor, and make a good 
crust ; cover your dish, take the flesh from 
the bones, and put half into it : strew over 
it half a pound of currants, washed and 
picked, and half a pound of raisins stoned ; 

M 



* 



242 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



then lay on the rest of your meat ; skim 
the liquor it was boiled in, sweeten it to 
your taste, and put in half a pint of white 
wine : pour all into the dish ; put on the 
lid, and bake it an hour and a half. 



SWEETBREAD PIE. 

Lay puff-paste, half an inch thick, at 
the bottom of a deep dish, and put the force- 
meat round the sides ; cut three or four 
sweetbreads, according to the size of the 
pie ; lay them in first, then artichoke bot- 
toms cut into four pieces each, then cocks’ 
combs, truffles, and morels, some asparagus 
tops, and fresh mushrooms, a few yolks of 
eggs boiled hard, and force-meat balls : sea- 
son with pepper and salt ; almost fill the 
pie with water, cover, and bake it two 
hours : when you take it out of the oven, 
pour in some rich veal gravy, and thicken 
it with a little cream and flour. 



ROYAL COOK. 



243 



VEGETABLES, Ac. 



STEWED MUSHROOMS. 

The mushrooms should be peeled very 
thin, and put into water, with the juice of 
a lemon ; melt a bit of butter into a stew- 
pan, then put in the mushrooms, and a 
little pepper and salt ; set them over the 
fire for about fifteen minutes ; (they should 
do very slow) ; add a little beshemell, if for 
white, and coulis for brown. 

N. B. Garden mushrooms are the best. 



A CHARTREUSE. 

Sheet the mould with sheets of bacon, 
cut a carrot in leaves, or any flower, to 
ornament the bottom of the mould; then 
lay in a layer of spinage ; scoop the carrot 
as long as the mould is deep, (the carrots 
should be boiled first, and all the other 
vegetables) ; then trim as many heads of 

M 2 



244 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



celery ; roll out spinage the same length 
and thickness, then put them upright in 
the mould, first a carrot, and next spinage, 
and so on ; then have some good force- 
meat, and put it all round the sides and 
bottom of the mould, and fill up the middle 
with cauliflour and beshemell ; put a bit of 
any kind of paste on the top, egg it over, 
and bind it to the force-meat ; then put the 
mould into a stewpan of water, so as to 
come up to the middle of the mould ; then 
put the stewpan in the oven for about an 
hour ; when done, turn it out, and take 
the bacon off, and soak the fat off that 
runs on the dish : put a little white Italian 
sauce round the bottom of the dish. 



MUSHROOMS EITHER FOR FIRST OR 
SECOND COURSE. 

Pare the mushrooms the same as an 
apple ; put them in the water, and squeeze 
a lemon in the water ; then put about two 
ounces of butter into a stewpan that will 
hold a quart of mushrooms, put in the 



ROYAL COOK. 



245 



mushrooms, a little pepper and salt, and 
the juice of two lemons ; put them over a 
slow fire to draw down ; they discharge a 
great deal of liquor, and should remain on 
the fire until the liquor is boiled away, and 
becomes quite dry, but be careful not to 
let them stick to the bottom of the stew- 
pan ; when done, put them into sweetmeat- 
pots, fill them three parts full, and fill the 
pot up to the top with clarified butter 
boiled quite hot. 

N. B. The pots will not require to be 
covered over ; when they are wanted for 
use, put the mushrooms into a stewpan to 
warm, strain the butter from them, and 
put them either into brown or white 
sauce, according to what they are wanted 
for. By following this method, you may 
have mushrooms all the year round. 



TURTLE HERBS IN GLAZE. 

Take marjoram, of both sorts an equal 
quantity, half the quantity of basil, as 
much of parsley, of lemon, orange, and 



246 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



common thyme, the same quantity as mar- 
joram, all picked from the stalks ; to a 
large handful of each herb put one pound 
of shalots, two pottles of mushrooms chop- 
ped very fine, two pounds of lean ham, a 
few truffles, if to be had, as they help the 
flavour ; put into a stewpan one pound of 
butter, one quart of the best stock, and then 
the herbs, ham, &c. ; put the stewpan on a 
slow stove, to stew very gently for three or 
four hours, or until the stock is quite reduced 
and the herbs and ham quite tender ; then 
rub them through a tammy ; then put them 
into a stewpan, and one quart of glaze, 
made from the best stock, or the bottom 
of braises ; put them on a quick stove, 
and keep stirring them while on the fire ; 
it should be until the glaze is reduced one 
quarter, or until the herbs become quite 
thick, and begin to stick to the bottom of 
the stewpan ; then put it into oval or 
round potting pots, as they are more con- 
venient than the preserving pots for cut- 
ting out small quantities ; those herbs will 
retain their flavour for six years, or longer. 
Turtle herbs done in this manner will be 



ROYAL COOK. 



247 



found very useful for mock-turtle, calf’s 
head hash, matelot of different kinds of 
fish : it takes but a small quantity to give 
the proper flavour to the above-mentioned 
uses ; about a quarter of an ounce to a pint 
of sauce, and so on to a larger quantity. 

N. B. They will be found very useful 
to take to the East or West Indies : if they 
should happen to be mouldy, a little hot 
water will take it off; the mouldy taste 
will not penetrate. 



PORTABLE SANTE HERBS, TO TAKE TO 
SEA, OR FOR SUMMER USE. 

What is meant by sante herbs, is as 
follows : — shred turnips, the red part of the 
carrot, green onions (when in season), at 
other times Spanish onions, if to be had ; 
if not, common onions, celery, picked cher- 
vil, and cabbage-lettuce ; as to quantity, 
that must depend upon how much soup is 
wanted, (about a pint of herbs, when stewed 
down, will do for two quarts of soup sante) ; 
when the herbs are all cut, and washed 



248 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



particularly clean, (as the lettuce and cher- 
vil are very likely to be gritty, if not well 
washed), put them into a soup-pot or stew- 
pan ; and if asparagus is in season, add 
one pint of asparagus peas to the quantity 
of herbs that will be sufficient for two 
quarts of soup ; put about one pint of good 
stock to them, and put them on a slow 
stove, to draw down until quite dry ; then 
put about half a pint of good glaze to them, 
and let them simmer in that for a few 
minutes ; then put them into oval or round 
potting pots, fill the pots three parts full 
with the herbs, and the next day fill them 
up with boiling hot glaze ; each pot should 
hold about one pint ; when wanted for use, 
put two quarts of water into a small soup- 
pot or stewpan ; when it boils, put the sante 
herbs in ; perhaps it may want a little salt ; 
one small lump of sugar will be a great 
advantage to the soup. 

N. B. The herbs done in this manner 
will be as good in six months as they were 
the day they were first done ; if kept in a 
damp place, they will be apt to get mouldy, 
but the mouldy taste will not penetrate ; 



ROYAL COOK. 



249 



pour a little hot water over the herbs, and 
the mould will come off, and leave no taste 
behind ; tavern keepers, and those who 
sell soups, would find a great advantage in 
having herbs by them for summer use. 



FRENCH BEANS PRESERVED. 

They should be gathered when full 
grown, but not to have any seed in them ; 
it is immaterial what sort ; the scarlet run- 
ners are as good as any for the purpose : 
make the brine as follows : — put water 
(according to the quantity of beans you 
intend to preserve) into a pot, and as much 
salt as will be the means of bearing an egg 
to about the middle of the water ; then 
put it on to boil for at least three hours, 
but it should not boil quick, as by so doing 
it would waste too much ; put the French 
beans into stone jars about three parts full ; 
when the brine is quite cold, fill the jars 
within about an inch, and the remainder 
part with salad oil ; tie a bladder over 
them ; they will keep good the year round ; 

M 5 



250 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



before using, soak them in warm water, 
and change it several times ; when they 
are put to boil, be particular that the water 
boils very fast before the beans are put in, 
and keep boiling till they are done. 

N. B. There is not the smallest doubt 
that French beans are a very good and 
wholesome vegetable to take to sea on 
long voyages, as the salt is very easily ex- 
tracted, by putting them in warm water 
for about two hours before using : the ex- 
pense of trying them would be very trifling ; 
the early part of September is the time 
they are very plentiful, and generally 
cheaper, or as cheap, as any other vege- 
table. 



VENISON MADE DISHES. 



A HAUNCH OF DOE VENISON. 

When on the spit, oil some butter, and 
butter the venison with a paste brush ; lay 



ROYAL COOK. 



251 



it thick, and sprinkle it over with salt ; put 
two sheets of white paper over it, then 
make paste of flour and water, roll it out 
rather thick, put it on the venison, and four 
sheets of paper on that ; tie it all on very 
tight ; put it to the fire, and baste it well, 
otherwise the fire will burn the paper and 
the twine : it will take two hours and a 
half: take the paper and the paste off', 
baste it with butter, flour it, and sprinkle 
it with salt ; make the dish very hot ; put 
the venison on the dish, and put some good 
gravy to it. 

N. B. All roasted venison is dressed the 
same wav. A haunch of buck venison will 
take four hours. Be very careful that the 
venison has no colour from the fire ; the 
paler the fat is, the better the venison is 
cooked. A neck of doe venison will take 
an hour ; a ditto of buck will take an hour 
and a half, or two hours. Venison should 
be rather under than over done. 



252 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



A NECK OF VENISON STEWED. 

Lay the bottom of a small braising-pan 
with sheets of fat bacon ; trim a neck of 
venison, and lay it on the bacon ; put a 
few onions, three heads of celery, a little 
parsley, a few blades of mace, and a quart 
of stock ; cover the venison with bacon, 
and then with white paper ; cover the 
braising-pan down close, and put it on a 
slow stove ; let it simmer for two hours, or 
till the bones will pull out ; take the veni- 
son up, strain and skim the braise, and 
reduce it to a glaze ; put haricot roots and 
coulis to it : put the venison on the dish, 
and cover it over with roots. 

N. B. A breast and shoulder are done 
the same way, only bone the shoulder. 



THE UMBLES OF DEER. 

Take a deer’s kidney, with the fat of 
the heart ; season them with pepper, salt, 
and nutmeg ; fry, and then stew them in 
good gravy till tender ; squeeze in a little 



HOYAL COOK. 



253 



lemon-juice, stuff the skirts with the force- 
meat made with the fat of the venison, fat 
bacon, grated bread, pepper, mace, sage, 
and onion, chopped very small : mix it 
with the yolk of an egg ; and when the 
skirts are stuffed, tie them on the spit to 
roast, but first strew over them thyme and 
lemon-peel : when done, lay the skirts in 
the middle of the dish, and the fricassee 
round them. 



EGG MADE DISHES. 



AN OMELET. 

An omelet is made as follows : — break 
eight eggs (leave out four whites) into a 
bason ; put a little chopped parsley, thyme, 
shalot, pepper, and salt ; beat them all to- 
gether for five or six minutes ; then put 
about a quarter of a pint of good cream, 
and break in about two ounces of cold 
butter ; put butter into an omelet-pan ; 



254 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



when melted, put in the omelet, and keep 
stirring it about until it begins to set ; then 
gather it up together with a knife, or a 
very small slice, made for that purpose ; if 
the dish is oval, shape the omelet oval ; if 
round, shape the omelet round ; turn it out 
on a plate, then put it on a dish, and a 
little sauce-tourney round the edge of it ; 
if for meagre, put no sauce ; a few oysters 
chopped and put in the omelet (to make a 
change) eat very well ; as also chopped 
ham, or kidney of veal, or any other thing 
your fancy leads to. 

N. B. The slice will be found better 
than a knife. 



AN OMELET A LA BOURGEOISE. 

Break eight eggs into a bason ; chop 
some parsley, green onions, or shives, pep- 
per, and salt ; put it in the eggs, beat it up 
well about three minutes, and break in two 
ounces of butter into pieces ; put a little 
butter into a pan ; when melted, put your 
omelet in the pan ; when done, turn it 
over on each side with a knife ; shape it 



ROYAL COOK. 



255 



according to your dish, and turn it out, up- 
side-down. 



EGGS FRIED IN PASTE. 

Boil six eggs for three minutes, put 
them into cold water, take off the shells, 
(but do not break the whites), wrap the 
eggs up in the trimmings of puff-paste, 
brush them over with egg, and sprinkle a 
few bread crumbs over them ; have lard or 
clarified butter in a stewpan, a sufficient 
quantity for the eggs to swim when they 
are put in ; when the lard is hot, put the 
eggs in, and fry them of a nice gold colour ; 
when done, lay them on a napkin. 



EGGS, WITH ONIONS AND MUSHROOMS. 

When the eggs are boiled hard, take 
out the yolks entire, and cut the whites in 
slips, with some onions and mushrooms ; 
fry the onions and mushrooms, throw in 
the whites, and turn them about a little ; 
pour off the fat, if there be any ; flour the 



256 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



% 



onions, Ac. and put to them a little of the 
gravy ; boil them up, then put in the yolks, 
and add a little pepper and salt : let the 
whole simmer for about a minute, and 
serve it up. 



MISCELLANEOUS DISHES. 



TO MAKE ESSENCE OF HAM. 

Take three or six pounds of good ham ; 
take off all the skin and fat, and cut the lean 
into slices about an inch thick ; lay them in 
the bottom of a stewpan, with slices of 
carrots, parsnips, three or six onions cut in 
slices ; cover it down very close, and set it 
over a stove, or on a very gentle fire ; let 
them stew till they stick to the pan, (take 
care it does not burn), then pour on some 
strong veal gravy by degrees, some fresh 
mushrooms cut in pieces, if to be had ; if 
not, mushroom-powder, some truffles and 
morels, some cloves, some basil, parsley, a 



ROYAL COOK. 



257 



crust of bread, and a leek ; cover it down 
close, and let it simmer till it is of a good 
thickness and flavour. 



PORTABLE SOUP. 

This soup (which is particularly calcu- 
lated for the use and convenience of tra- 
vellers, from its not receiving any injury 
by time) must be made in the following 
manner : — cut into small pieces three large 
legs of veal, one of beef, and the lean part 
of ham ; put a quarter of a pound of butter 
at the bottom of a large cauldron, then lay 
in the meat and bones, with four ounces of 
anchovies, and two ounces of mace ; cut off 
the green of five or six heads of celery, 
wash the heads quite clean, cut them small, 
put them in, with three large carrots cut 
thin, cover the cauldron quite close, and 
set it over a moderate fire ; when you find 
the gravy begins to draw, keep taking it 
up till you have got it all out ; then put 
water in to cover the meat ; set it on the 
fire again, and let it boil gently for four 



258 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



hours ; then strain it through a hair-sieve 
into a clean pan, till it is reduced to one 
part out of three ; strain the gravy you 
draw from the meat into the pan, and let 
it boil gently till you find it of a glutinous 
consistence, observing to keep skimming off 
the fat clean, as it rises : you must take 
particular care, when it is nearly done 
enough, that it does not burn : season it to 
your taste with Cayenne pepper, and pour 
it on flat earthen dishes a quarter of an 
inch thick ; let it stand till the next day, 
and then cut it out by round tins a little 
larger than a crown piece : lay the cake in 
dishes, and set them in the sun to dry ; to 
facilitate which, turn them often : when 
the cakes are dry, put them into a tin box, 
with a piece of clean white paper between 
each, and keep them in a dry place ; if 
made in frosty weather, it will be sooner 
formed into its proper solidity. — This soup 
is not only particularly useful to travellers, 
but is also exceedingly convenient to be 
kept in private families ; for by putting one 
oi the cakes into a saucepan, with about a 
pint of water and a little salt, a bason of 



ROYAL COOK. 



259 



good broth may be had in a few minutes. 
Another convenience attending this soup, 
is, that by boiling a large quantity of 
water with one of the cakes, it will make 
an excellent gravy for roast turkies or fowls. 



* \ 

GLAZE FOR LAUDING, &c. 

Let the stock that is intended for this 
use be as clean as possible, and of a pale 
colour ; (if the stock is not clear, it should 
be cleared with eggs, and run through a 
jelly-bag) ; boil it over the fire until it 
hangs to the spoon ; when done, put it into 
a glaze-kettle ; (the glaze-kettle is made 
similar to a milk-kettle, and of the best 
block-tin) : when the glaze is wanted for 
use, put the kettle into a stewpan of water, 
by the side of a stove. 



TURTLE HERBS, DRIED. 

Take basil, pot marjoram, sweet mar- 
joram, orange-thyme, lemon-thyme, and 
common-thyme, parsley four times the 



260 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



quantity of the other herbs ; put them to dry 
gradually, (so as to take four or five days 
to dry) ; when quite dry, rub them, with 
the hand, through a hair-sieve, then put 
them in a cannister or a bottle, and keep 
them in a dry place : they will be found 
very useful for seasoning force-meat, and 
many other purposes, and not the smallest 
, expense : they will keep good for years.. 



TO MAKE BROWNING FOR ALL SAUCES 
AND GRAVIES. 

Beat small four ounces of treble-refined 
sugar, and put it into a braising-pan, with 
an ounce of butter ; put it on a clear fire, 
and mix it well together ; when it begins 
to be frothy, put it higher over the fire ; 
when the sugar and butter are of a deep 
brown, pour in a little red wine, and stir it 
well together ; then add more wine, about 
a pint in all, and keep stirring it all the 
time ; put in half an ounce of Jamaica 
pepper, six cloves, shalots, two or three 
blades of mace, three spoonfuls of catsup. 



ROYAL COOK. 



261 



a little salt, and the rliind of a lemon ; 
boil them slowly about ten minutes, and 
then pour it into a bason : when it is cold, 
skim it very clean, and bottle it up toge- 
ther. 

N. B. The wine may be omitted. 



FONDUES. 

Grate half a pound of Parmesan 
cheese ; put a bit of butter into a stewpan ; 
when melted, add a few spoonfuls of cream ; 
put the cheese in while on the fire, and 
keep stirring it until melted ; then take it 
off the fire, and put in six yolks of eggs, 
one at a time, stirring it all the while ; put 
in about two spoonfuls of mustard, and a 
little pepper and salt ; beat it up until it 
becomes like a thick cream, then beat up 
well the white of three eggs, and put them 
to it ; put it into a case, if for one ; or in 
small cases, folded up for that purpose : 
ten minutes will bake them. 



262 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



SOUR CROUT. 

When the large white cabbages are full 
grown, cut all the green leaves from them ; 
slice the white part in thin slices, cut very 
fine ; sprinkle it over with salt, put a cab- 
bage into a tub for that purpose ; put in a 
layer of cabbage, then a few juniper berries, 
or carraway seeds, and then cabbage, and 
so on until the tub is quite full : it must be 
pounded down with a wooden pestle until 
the juice of the cabbage comes on the top ; 
(the size of the tub depends upon the quan- 
tity wanted) : then put on a clean cloth, ii 
clean board over that, and put some heavy 
weights on them, to keep them down close ; 
for the heavier the weight is, the more it 
will press the liquor from the cabbage ; as 
the liquor rises, pour it off ; it should be 
done at least six weeks or two months be- 
fore using; when any is wanted for use, 
wash it in warm water, and pick all the 
juniper berries from the cabbage. The 
best way of dressing it is as follows : — put 
half a pint of good stock, a quarter of a 
pound of butter, and a piece of pickled 



ROYAL COOK. 



26.3 



pork on the top, or a fillet of beef, larded 
and glazed ; put it on a slow stove, to stew 
at least five hours ; put the cabbage on the 
dish, and fry pork sausages and put them 
round the dish : it may be used for many 
other things ; namely, ox and sheep rumps, 
roulard of veal and mutton, &cc. 



SAUSAGES. 

The trimmings from the hams, and part 
of the griskin, fat and lean, an equal quan- 
tity should first be cut very fine with a 
knife, (be careful to take all the sinews 
out) ; then chop it very fine with a chop- 
ping knife ; season it, when done chopping, 
with pepper and salt, and a little fine spice ; 
put a little sage, chopped very fine, and 
mix it well after seasoning; then put it 
either in skins, or a pot ; if in a pot, press 
it down very hard, and put a little pepper 
and salt on the top : a pot is the handiest 
for family use, as it will keep longer : when 
wanted, roll them up, and fry them in cla- 
rified butter. 



1 



264 



THE IMPERIAL ANB 



SORREL FOR WINTER USE. 

The sorrel should be picked so as to be 
very fresh from the stalks, and washed in 
several waters, as it is very apt to be 
gritty ; chop it very fine, and squeeze the 
water from it ; then put a bit of butter into 
a stewpan, a slice of lean ham, and one 
large onion chopped very fine, about two 
table spoonfuls of good stock, and then the 
sorrel ; put the stewpan on a stove to sim- 
mer till it becomes quite dry ; then put it 
into a deep sweat-meat pot, and cover it 
over with hot clarified butter. 



A GALENTINE. 

Bone a breast of veal, and beat it for 
five minutes with the flat part of a heavy 
chopper, to make it roll up the better; 
then spread it on a table, and brush the 
inside with egg ; it will take two eggs ; 
then lay a piece of lean ham, cut in long 
square pieces, the length of the cross-way of 
the breast of veal, one piece of omelet of 



ROYAL COOK. 



265 



yolks of eggs, one white of egg, then a 
thick row of chopped parsley, lean ham, 
and omelet, &cc . ; when well covered, put 
egg over it, and sprinkle it well with 
chopped mushrooms, truffles, shalot, thyme, 
parsley, pepper, salt, and fine spice ; then 
roll it up very tight, and roll the collar up 
in a cloth, and put it into a brown braise ; 
set it on a stove to boil very slow for six 
hours, or until very tender ; then take it 
up, and put it on a pewter dish, with 
another of the same size over it, and a 
heavy weight on the top dish to press it 
flat ; it should be done two days before it 
is wanted ; then slice it out for supper : it 
is generally used for ball-suppers: when 
dished up, put chopped aspic in the middle, 
and some round the galentine. 

N. B. A breast of mutton must be 
dressed the same way. 



ASPIC OF BRAWN. 

Put a little aspic in the mould, so as to 
cover the bottom : when cold, ornament it 

N 



2 66 



THE IMPERIAL AND 



either with flowers or different coloured 
omelets ; then put a little more aspic, (but 
be very careful how you put it in, for, if 
not done with care, you will disturb the 
work) ; when cold, put a little more ; then 
put in the brawn, cut in neat pieces, and 
fill up the mould with aspic : when cold, 
turn it out ; (dip the mould in milk warm 
water) : garnish with sliced lemon. 



CRAYFISH PUDDING. 

Boil a hundred of crayfish, (put a little 
salt and vinegar in the water), and pick 
the flesh from the tails and claws ; put them 
into a mortar, with a quarter of a pound 
of butter, twelve anchovies, without wash- 
ing, then the spawn of a lobster ; let it be 
well pounded, and rubbed through a tam- 
my sieve; then put it into a bason, and 
break in twelve eggs, only one at a time, 
and mix that one with the crayfish before 
you put in another, and so on, till all the 
eggs are broken in ; then put in the crumb 
of two French rolls that have been soaked 

6 



ROYAL COOK. 



267 



in cream ; beat them all well together ; 
butter the mould with butter that has been 
clarified and is three parts cold ; nut the 
butter on the mould with a paste-brush ; 
put the crayfish into the mould, and the 
mould into a stewpan of boiling water, 
(the water should come half way up the 
mould) ; set the stewpan on a stove to boil 
slowly ; put the cover on, and some lighted 
charcoal on the cover ; it will take an hour 
to finish it ; turn it out on the dish, and 
put red Italian sauce round the edge of the 
dish : garnish with paste. 

N. B. The sauce should be white, and 
made red with the spawn of a lobster; 
pound it, and rub it through a tammy- 
sieve ; squeeze in a little lemon-juice. 



A GRENADE. 

Sheet a mould (that will match the 
chartreuse) with layers of bacon ; put force- 
meat round the sides, and at the bottom ; 
fill it with any kind of poultry that has 
been left from last dinner ; put the mould 

n 2 



ROYAL COOK 



268 



into a stewpan of water, then put it in the 
oven for an hour ; turn it out, and put 
coulis round the sides of the dish. 

N. B. Put paste on the top, before it is 
in the oven, the same as the chartreuse. 



THE END. 



INDEX 



A la Reine Sauce, 30. 
Alamand Sauce, 35. 

Almond Paste, 225. 

Almond Puffs, 205. 

Amiens Pie, 213. 

Angelica Tarts, 201. 

Apple and Barberry Tart, 
183. 

Asparagus Soup, clear, 14. 
Aspic of Brawn, 265. 

Atlets of Oysters, 149. 

Baked Carp, 160. 

Bails, Rgg, 28. 

Barbecued Pig, 89. 

Barberry and Apple Tart, 
183. 

Beans, French, preserved, 
249. 

Beef-a-la-Mode, 50. 
Beef-k-la-Viugrette, 53. 

Beef, Brisket of, stewed, 40. 
Beef, Collared, 43. 

Beef, Fillet of, larded, 41. 
Beef, Fricandeau of, 52. 

Beef made Dishes, 39. 

Beef Olives, 46. 

Beef Palates, 47. 

Beef Palates rolled, 39. 

Beef, Portugal, 52. 

Beef, round of, forced, 49. 
Beef, Rump of, a la Daube, 
and Cabbage, 54. 

Beef, Rump of, si la Mantua, 
42. 

Beef Steaks rolled, 53, 

Beef, stewed, 48. 

Beshemell Sauce, 21. 

Biscuits, Sponge, 184. 

Blanc MaDge, 182. 



Blanquet of Poularde with 
Mushrooms, 99. 

Boeuf de Cliasse, 44. 

BoiledChickensand Tarragon 
Sauce, 92. 

Bouilli for Sauce, 4. 

Bouilli, Sauce for, 4. 

Bouilli and Soup, 14. 

Braise, Brown, 23. 

Braise, White, 23. 

Braise, Dry, 24. 

Braised Ducks with Turnips, 
96. 

Braised Grouse and Cabbage, 

111 . 

Braised Ham, 85. 

Braised Pigeons and Aspara- 
gus Peas, 108. 

Brawn, Aspic of, 265. 

Breast of Veal a la Flamond, 
73. 

Breast of Veal a l’ltalienne, 
78. 

Breast ofVeal ragouted whole, 

68 . 

Breast of Veal, with Truffles, 
a l’ltalienne, 76. 

Brisket of Beef stewed, 40. 

Brown Braise, 23. 

Browning for all Sauces and 
Gravies, 260. 

Cakes, Sponge, 184. 

Calves’ Feet Pie, 241. 

Calf’s Head, German way of 
dressing, 80. 

Calf’s Pluck, 81. 

Calves’ ears forced, 75. 

Calves’ Feet, Tureen of, and 
Asparagus Peas, 84. 

N 3 



270 



INDEX 



Capiloted Fowl, 107. 

Carp Baked, 160. 

Carp and Eel, Matelot of, 154. 
Carp, Matolet of, 153. 

Carp, So ties of, 158. 

Carrot Sauce, 30. 

Cederata Cream, 178. 
Chantilla Cake, 170. 
Chartreuse, A, 243. 

Cherry Tart, 200. 

Chervil Sauce, 32. 

Chesnut Pudding, 194. 
Chickens boiled and Tarragon 
Sauce, 92. 

Chickens and Celery Sauce, 
92. 

Chickens, Chiringrate, 125. 
Chickens, Fricasee of, 94. 
Chicken Panado, 119. 
Chickens in Savory Jelly, 122. 
Chicken, Timball of, 233. 
China Chilo, 60. 

China Orange Jelly, 187. 
Chine of Lamb and Cucumber 
Sauce, 67. 

Chiringrate Chickens, 125. 
Chocolate Puffs, 205. 
Chocolate Tart, 202. 
Christmas Pie, 220. 

Citron Pudding, 195. 

Civet of Hare, 96. 

Coffee Cream, in Cups, 178. 
Collared Beef, 43. 

Collops, Scotch, or scorched, 
83. 

Collops, white, and Cucum- 
bers, 72. 

Compote of Pears, 180. 
Compote of Pigeons, with 
Truflles, 104. 

Coulis, 20. 

Crab, dressed, hot or cold, 
145. 

Crayfish in Aspic, 157. 
Crayfish Pudding, 266. 
Cream, Cederata, 178. 
Cream, Coffee, in Cups, 178. 
Cream, Orange, 1S6. 

Cream Pancakes, 208. 



Cream, Raspberry, 177. 
Cream, Rhenish, 180. 

Cressey Soup, 5. 

Cucumbers, Souties of, 55. 
Cucumber Sauce, 35. 
Cucumbers and white Col- 
lops, 72. 

Curd and Almond Pudding 
baked, 191. 

Curd Puffs, 206. 

Currie of Rabbits, 93. 

Currie of Rabbits, another 
way, 93. 

Custard Fritters, 210. 

Custard Pudding, 194. 
Darioles, 175. 

Daubed Fowls, 112. 

Deer, Umbles of, 252. 

Dried Turtle herbs, 259. 

Dry Braise, 24. 

Duck it la Daube, 91. 

Ducks a la Franfoise, 122. 
Ducks braised with Turnips, 
96. 

Ducks, Macedonian, 127. 
Dutch Sauce, 36. 

Eels, Spitcbcock, 159. 

Eels, Volevent of, 146. 

Egg Balls for Turtle, Mock 
Turtle, &c. 28. 

Egg Made Dishes, 253. 

Eggs with Onions and Mush- 
rooms, 255. 

Eggs fried in Paste, 255. 
Essence of Ham, 256. 

Farce, 26. 

Fat Livers in Cases, 95. 

Fillet of Beef larded, 41. 
Fillet of Pork, 85. 

Fillets of Salmon with Ca- 
pers, 140. 

Fillet of Sole a Pltalienne, 
140. 

Fillet of Sturgeon and Sauce 
Royal, 147. 

Fillet of Veal a la Flamond, 
73. 

Fillets of Hare larded, &c . 
108. 



INDEX 



271 



Fillets of Whiting, 144. 

Fish made Dishes, 137. 

Fish Pie, with Tench, Eels, 
and hard Eggs, 149. 

Fish, Souties of, 142. 
Flamond Soup, 8. 

Flemish Sauce, S3. 
Florendine Hare, 123. 
Fondues, 261. 

Force-meat, cold, for Balls, 
&c. 27. 

Force-meat, hot, 26. 

Fowl a la Daube, 90. 

Fowl a la Daube, ornamented 
and garnished with Aspic, 
105. 

Fowl, Capiloted, 107. 

Fowls, Daubed, 112. 

Fowl, Fricandeau of, and 
Endive, 97. 

Fowl, Marinaded, 127. 
Fowl, Quennels of, 109. 
French Beans preserved, 249. 
Fricandeau of Fowl and En- 
dive, 97. 

Fricandeau of Beef, 52. 
Fricasee of Chickens, 94. 
Friiters, Custard, 210. 
Fritters, Hasty, 211. 

Fritters, Mushroom, 185. 
Fritters, Royal, 211. 
Fritters, Spanish, 170. 
Fritters, White, 210. 
Galentine, A, 264. 

Gateau Millefleur, 179. 
George Pudding, 196. 
German way of dressing a 
Calf’s Head, 80. 

Giblet Soup, 5. 

Giblets, Stewed, 130. 

Ginger, Souffle of, 171. 
Glaze for Larding, &c. 259. 
Goodevean, Pate, 231. 

Goose Marinade, 126. 

Goose, Ragout, A, 129. 
Gooseberry Pudding, 196. 
Grateful Pudding, 197. 
Gratin, Sheep’s Trotters in, 
56. 



Grenade, A, 267. 

Grouse braised and Cabbage, 

111 . 

Gum Paste for Ornaments, 

18 S. 

Goose and Turkey Pie, 214. 
Haddock and Whitings, 163. 
Ham braised, 85. 

Haui, Essence of, 256. 

Hare, Civet of, 96. 

Hare, Fillets of, larded, &c. 
103. 

Hare, Florendine, 123. 

Hare, Jugged, 114. 

Hare, Potted, 118. 

Hare Soup, 12. 

Haricot of Mutton, 59. 
Hashis Sauce, 30. 

Hasty Fritters, 211. 

Haunch of Doe Venison, 250. 
Hen and Chickens, 57. 

Hodge Podge, 45. 

Icing for Rich Cakes, 183. 
Italian Pudding, 198. 

Italian Sauce, brown, 31. 
Jack or Pike baked, 155. 
Jelly, China Orange, 187. 
Jelly, Clear, ornamented or 
plain, 176. 

Jelly, Stock, 25. 

Jugged Hare, 114. 

Lamb, Chine of, and Cucum- 
ber Sauce, 67. 

Lamb Cutlets larded, &c. 63. 
Lamb, Leg of, and Haricot 
Beans, 66. 

Lamb, Loin of, braised and 
Celery Sauce, 60. 

Lamb made Dishes, 60. 
Lamb, Necks of, Chevaux dc 
Frise, 61 . 

Lamb Pie in a Dish, 236. 
Lamb, Quarter of, forced, 65. 
Lamb, Shoulder of, larded, 61, 
Lambs' Feet with Asparagus 
Peas, 62. 

Lambs’ Tails, Tureen of, 64. 
Larded Pigeons and Ragout 
of Cocks’ Combs, 1 10. 



272 



INDEX 



Larding, Glaze for, 259. 
Larks a la Fraifoise, 134. 

Leg of Lamb and Haricot 
Beans, 66. 

Leg of Mutton roasted with 
Oysters, 56. 

Leg of Pork a la Boisseau, 

86 . 

Lemon Puffs, 206. 

Liver of Turtle, Souties of, 

143. 

Livers, Fat, in Cases, 95. 
Lobster dressed, hot or cold, 
145. 

Loin of Lamb braised and 
Celery Sauce, 60. 

Loin of Veal a la Beshemell, 

10 . 

Lorraine Soup, 17. 

Maccaroni Timbal 1 of, 233. 
Macedonian Ducks, 127. 
Maigre Soup, 17. 

Marinade, a Goose, 126. 
Marinaded Fowl, 127. 
Marrow Pudding, 198. 
Matelot of Carp, 153. 
Matelot of Carp and Eel, 
154. 

Matelot of Tench, 144. 
Meringues, 190. 

Mince Pies, 227. 
Miscellaneous Dishes, 256. 
Mock Turtle, 6. 

Morue a la Creme, 148. 
Mushroom Fritters, 185. 
Mushrooms either for First or' 
Second Course, 244. 
Mushrooms preserved for 
Sauce, &c. 36. 

Mushrooms Slew ed, 243. 
Mutton, Haricot of, 59. 
Mutton, Leg of, roasted with 
Oysters, 56. 

Mutton Made Dishes, 55. 
Mutton Panado, 120. 

Mutton Pies, small, 229. 
Mutton and Potatoe Pie in a 
Raised Crust, 230. 

Mutton Rumps braised, 58. 



Mutton, Shoulder of, called 
Hen and Chickens, 57. 
Mutton, Souties of, 55. 

Necks of Lamb Chevaux de 
Frise, 61. 

Neck of Veal braised and 
Sauce, a la Reine, 74. 
Neck of Venison stewed, 252. 
Olives, Beef, 46. 

Olives, Veal, 67. 

Omelet ala Bourgeoise, 254. 
Omelet, An, 253. 

Orange (China) Jelly, 187. 
Orange Cream, 186. 

Orange Puffs, 207. 

Orange Souffle, 188. 

Orange Tart, 202. 

Ox Cheek Soup, 15. 

Oxford J ohn, 57. 

Ox Rumps, 39. 

Oysters, Atlets of, 149. 
Oysters fried in batter, 150. 
Oysters, Voleventof, 151. 
Panado, Chicken, 119. 
Panado, Mutton, 120. 
Pancakes, 208. 

Pancakes, Cream, 208. 
Pancakes, Pink coloured, 
209. 

Pancakes, Rice, 209. 
Partridge Pie, 220. 
Partridges preserved, for 
Entres, Pies, &c. 115. 
Paste, Short, 224. 

Pasty, Venison, 236. 

Paste, Almond, 225. 

Paste, Hot, for raised Pies, 
225. 

Paste, Tart, 224. 

Pitt6, a la Fran$oise, 213. 
Pit6s, Fine, 238. 

Pate, Goodevean, 231. 

Patds, like Mince Pies, 204. 
Pat6s, Sweet, 204. 

Pates, Veal, 204. 

Pears, Compote of, 180. 

Peu d* Amours, 186. 
Pheasants, preserved for En- 
tr6s, Pies, &c. 115. 



INDEX 



273 



Pheasants, Souties of, and 
Truffles, 100. 

Peths ou Gratin, 42. 

Pickled Salmon, 157. 

Pie, Amiens, 2 IX 
Pie, Calves’ Feet, 241. 

Pie, Christinas, 220. 

Pie, Cold Partridge, 220. 
Pie, Goose, 214. 

Pie, (raised) with a Neat’s 
Tongue, 233. 

Pie, Lamb, in a dish, 236. 
Pie, Lamb or Veal, a haul 
goat, 240. 

Pie, Mutton and Potatoe in 
raised crust, 230. 

Pie, Pigeon, 212. 

Pie, rich Veal, 240. 

Pie, Sweetbread, 242. 

Pie, with Tench, Eels, and 
hard Eggs, 149. 

Pie, Truffle hot, 234. 

Pie, Turkey, 214. 

Pie, Woodcock, 229. 

Pie, Woodcock, cold, 226. 
Pies, Mince, 227. 

Pies, Mutton, 229. 

Pies and Pastry, 212. 

Pig au Pere Duillet, 87. 

Pig, Barbacued, 89. 

Pigeons, a la Daube, 131. 
Pigeons, a la Plimpton, 132. 
Pigeons, a la Royale, 132. 
Pigeon Pie in a Dish, 212. 
Pigeon Pie, (raised), 235. 
Pigeons, a la Crapandine and 
Piquant Sauce, 103. 
Pigeons, braised, and Aspa- 
ragus Peas, 108. 

Pigeons, Compote of, with 
Truffles, 104. 

Pigeons larded, and a Ragout 
of Cocks-coinbs, 110. 
Pigeons in Savory Jelly, 130. 
Pike or Jack, bilked, 155. 
Pillow of Veal. 82. 
Pink-coloured Pancakes, 209. 
Piquant Sauce, 29. 

Plutn Pudding, 189. 



Poivrade Sauce, 29. 

Pork, Fillet of, 85. 

Pork, Leg of, a la Boisseau, 

86 . 

Pork, Loin of, Sicilian man- 
ner of dressing, to eat like 
Wild Boar, 88. 

Pork Made IJishes, 85. 
Portable Saute Herbs, to t3ke 
to Sea or for Summer use, 
247. 

Portable Soup, 257. 

Portugal Beef, 52. 

Potted Hare, 118. 

Potted Venison, 237. 
Poularde, Blanquet of, with 
Mushrooms, 99. 

Poultry made Dishes, 90. 
Pudding, Chesnut, 194. 
Pudding, Citron, 195. 
Pudding, Cray-fish, 266. 
Pudding, Custard, 194. 
Pudding, George, 196. 
Pudding, Gooseberry, 196. 
Pudding, Grateful, 197. 
Pudding, Italian, 193. 
Pudding, Lady Sunderland’s, 
197. 

Pudding, Marrow, 198. 
Pudding, Plum, 189. 
Pudding, Quince, 199. 
Pudding, Ratafie, 173. 
Pudding, Sago, 199. 

Pudding, Small Curd and A1-. 
mond, baked, 191. 

[ Pudding, Tapioca, 189. 

Puff, Almond, 205. 

Puff, Chocolate, 205. 

Puff’, Curd, 206. 

Puff, Lemon, 206. 

Puff, Orange, 207. 

Puff, Paste,. 222. 

Puff, Paste, another way, 223. 
Puffs, 205. 

Puff, Sugar, 207. 

Pull's, with Chicken, 239. 
Purslain Leaves, Snipes with, 
134. 

Quarter of Lamb, forced, 65. 



274 



INDEX 



Quenels of Fowl, 109. 

Quince Pudding, 199. 

Rabbits, Currie of, 93. 
Rabbits, another way, 93. 
Rabbits, en Gallenline, 136, 
Rabbits, en Matelot, 136. 
Rabbits, Surprized, 135. 
Ragout, a Goose, 129. 
Ragout, Melle, 90. 

Raspberry Cream, 177. 
Raspberry Tarts, and Cream, 
203. 

Ratifie Pudding, 173. 

Ravigot Sauce, 33. 

Rhenish Cream, 180. 

Rhubarb Tart, 203. 

Rice Pancakes, 209. 

Rice Souffle, 174. 

Rice Soup, w ith a Chicken, 12. 
Rimaulade of Smelts, 152. 
Risoles, 232. 

Royal Fritters, 211. 

Royal Sauce, w hite or brown, 
33. 

Roulard of Veal and Mush- 
rooms, 7 1 . 

Round of Beef, forced, 49. 
Rump of Beef, ala Daube, 54. 
Rump of Beef, a la Mantua, 
42. 

Sago Pudding, 199. 

Salmie of Wild Ducks, 98. 
Salrnie of Woodcocks, 102. 
Salmon, 161. 

Salmon Fillets, with Capers, 
J 40. 

Salmon, Pickled, 157. 
Salmon, Souties of, with Ca- 
pers, 156. 

Salmon with sweet Herbs, 
138. 

Sante Herbs, Portable, 247. 
Sante Soup, 25. 

Sauce a la Reine, 35. 

Sauce Alematid, 30. 

Sauce, Carrot, 30. 

Sauce, Chervil, 32. 

Sauce, Cucumber, 35. 

Sauce, Flemish, 33. 



Sauce, Dutch, 36. 

Sauce, Hashis, 30. 

Sauce, Italian Brown, 31. 

Sauce, Mushrooms for, 36. 

Sauce, Piquant, 29. 

Sauce, Poivrade, 29. 

Sauce, Ravigot, 33. 

Sauce, Restauret, 46. 

Sauce Royal, white or brown, 
33. 

Sauce, Shalot, 32. 

Sauce, Sorrel, 31 . 

Sauce, Spanish, 34. 

Sauce, Tournay and Beshe- 
mell, 21. 

Sauces, General, Meagre, Stock 
for, 26. 

Saumon a la Braze, 137. 

Savoy Cake, 192. 

Sausages, 263. 

Scotch or Scorched Collops, 85. 

Sem els of Turtles, 142. 

Shalot Sauce, 32. 

Sheep’s Rumps and Kidneys, 
55. 

Sheeps’ Trotters in Gratin, 56. 

Short Paste, 224. 

Shoulder of Lamb, larded, 61 . 

Shoulder of Mutton, called 
Hen and Chickens, 57. 

Shoulder of Veal, a la Pied- 
montaise, 78. 

Sicilian Manner of dressing 
Loin of Pork to eat like 
Wild Boar, 88. 

Smelts, Rimaulade of, 152. 

Snipes with Purslain Leaves, 
134. 

Snipes or Woodcocks in sur- 
tout, 121. 

Sole, (Fillet of), a l’ltaliennc, 
140. 

Sole, Souties of, with Sauce, 
a la Reine, 141 . 

Soles, a la Frangoise, 139. 

Sorrel Sauce, 31. 

Sorrel for Winter Use, 264. 

Souffle of Ginger, 171. 

Souffle, Orange, 188. 



INDEX 



275 



Souffle, Rice, 174. 

Soup, a FEcrivisse, 13. 

Soup, a la Reine, 2. 

Soup, Asparagus, 14. 

Soup, Bouilli, 14. 

Soup, Cressey, 5. 

Soup, Flamond, 8. 

Soup, Giblet a la Tortue, 5. 
Soup, Hare, 12. 

Soup, Lorraine, 17. 

Soup, Maigre, 17. 

Soup, Ox Cheek, 15. 

Soup, Portable, 257. 

Soup, Rice, with Chicken, 12. 
Soup, Sante, 25. 

Soup, Vermicelli, white or 
brown, 4. 

Soups, General, Meagre, stock 
for, 26. 

Soups, General, Stock for, IS. 
Soups, General Remarks on, 1. 
Sour Crout, 262. 

Souties of Carp, 158. 

Souties of FLh, 142. 

Souties of Liver of Turtle, 143. 
Souties of Mutton and Cu- 
cumbers, 55. 

Souties of Pheasants and 
Truffles, 100. 

Souties of Salmon with Ca- 
pers, 156. 

Souties of Sole with Sauce a 
la' Reine, 141 . 

Souties of Sweetbreads and 
Piquant Sauce, 74. 

Sponge Biscuitsfor Cakes, 184. 
Spanish Fritters, 170, 

Spanish Sauce, 34. 

Spitchcock Eels, 159. 

Stewed Beef, 18. 

Stewed Mushrooms, 243. 
Stock, General, for all kinds 
of Soups, 18. 

Stock, General, Meagre, for 
Soups and Sauces, 26. 

Stock Jelly, 25. 

Sturgeon, Fillet of, and Sauce 
Royal, 147. 

Sugar Pull's, 207. 



Sunderland’s (Lady) Pudding, 
Sweets, 170. 

Sweetbreads and Asparagus 
Peas, 77. 

Sweetbreads and an Emince 
76. ’ 

Sw'eetbread Pie, 242. 
Sweetbreads, Souties of, and 
Piquant Sauce, 74. 
Sweetbreads of Veal a la 
Dauphine, 79. 

Sweet Pat 6s, 204. 

Tapioca Pudding, 189. 

Tart, Cherry, 200. 

Tart, Chocolate, 202. 

Tart de Moi, 200. 

Tart, Orange, 202. 

Tart, Paste, 224. 

Tart, Raspberry cream, 203. 
Tart, Rhubarb, 203. 

Tarts, 200. 

Tarts, Angelica, 201. 

Tartlets, 179. 

Tench, Matelot of, 144. 
Tendrones of Veal, 69. 

Timball of Maccaroni and 
Chicken, 233* 

Tongue and Udoer, forced,51. 
Tourney and Beshemell Sauce, 

21 . 

Trifle, 180. 

Tripe, 48. 

Truffle Pie, hot, 234. 

Truffles, 37. 

Turbot, 162. 

Tureen of Calves’ Feet and 
Asparagus Peas, 81. 

Tureen of Lambs’ Tails, 61. 
Turkey a. la Daube, 133. 
Turkey and Goose Pie, 214. 
Turtle, 164. 

Turtle Herbs, dried, 259. 

Tur tle Herbs in Glaze, 245. 
Turtle, Mock, 6. 

Turtle, the West India way 
of dressing, 8. 

Turtles, Semels of, 142. 
Udder forced, 51. 



276 



INDEX 



Umbles of Deer, 252. 

Veal, Breast of, a la Flamond, 
73. 

Veal, Breast of, al’Italienne, 
78. 

Veal, Breast of, Ragouted 
whole, 68. 

Veal, Breast of, w ith Truffles 
a l’ltalienne, 76. 

Veal, Fillet of, ala Flamond, 
73. 

Veal or Lamb Pie, a haut 
gout, 240. 

Veal, Loin of, ala Beshemell, 
70. 

Veal, Made Dishes, 67. 

Veal, Neck of, braised and 
Sauce a la Reine, 74. 

Veal Olives, 67. 

Veal PMes, 204. 

Veal Pie, Rich, 240. 

Veal, Pillow' of, 82. 

Veal, Roulard of, and Mush- 
rooms, 71. 

Veal, Shoulder of, a la Pied- 
montaise, 78. 

Veal, Sweetbreads of, a la 
Dauphine, 79. 



Veal, Tendrones of, 69. 
Vegetables, 243. 

Venison, Haunch of, 250. 
Venison, Made Dishes, 250. 
Venison, Neck of, stewed, 
252. 

Venison, Pasty, 236. 

Venison, Potted, 237. 
Vermicelli Soup, White or 
Brown, 4. 

Volevent of Eels, 146. 
Volevent of Oysters, 151. 
White Braise, 23. 

White Collops and Cucum- 
bers, 72. 

White Fritters, 210. 
Whitings, Fillets of, 144. 
Whitings and Haddocks, 163. 
Wild Ducks, mode of dress- 
ing, 128. 

Wild Ducks, Salmic of, 98. 
Woodcock Pie, 229. 
Woodcock Pie, cold, 226. 
Woodcocks a la Tartar, 101. 
Woodcocks, Salinie of, 102. 
Woodcocks or Snipes in Sur- 
tout, 121. 



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